We Are Committed. We Will Not Step Back.

Yesterday, the New York Times reported that the Trump Administration is considering redefining sex to be only “either male or female, unchangeable, and determined by the genitals that a person is born with.” If carried out, the proposal in the leaked memo from the Department of Health and Human Services will continue the efforts already underway to deny transgender, gender non-conforming (TGNC) and intersex people necessary medical care, access to safety, basic protections and ultimately, their humanity. This is violence.

The Administration is hoping to remove our hard-won protections and rights by fostering a climate of violence in which TGNC people’s live are devalued in this country. At AVP, we see daily the toll of this kind of state violence. We’ve been sounding the alarm about the current crisis of violence that last year took the lives of at least 27 TGNC victims of homicide and at least 22 lives this year. We cannot afford to take even one step backward. Our TGNC community members and family members’ lives are depending on us now.

With this despicable attempt to erase millions of people who identify as transgender, gender non-conforming or non-binary, and those who are intersex, the administration has underestimated our community’s rage, defiance and the power of our organizing for and with each other. We will not stand silently by while this Administration continues to try to dehumanize any of us.

This is not a wait and see moment. This is a moment for each of us to commit to working to calling out and stopping transphobia in all of the places it lives. We must all find ways to show up and engage in this fight at this moment.

As a Black cisgender lesbian, I know I can and must do even more now, to stand up as my community is under attack. To the cisgender members of our AVP family, I am inviting you to join me in standing with and for TGNC people right now and into the future. In the coming days and weeks, we will be outlining specific ways you can take action as allies, so watch this space.

And to our TGNC family, we see you and we are here for you. You can always reach out to AVP’s confidential 24-hour English/Spanish hotline at (212) 714-1141 or drop into our office.

Together we can make a difference.

Until we are all safe and free,

Beverly Tillery
Executive Director

Anti-Violence Project Condemns Travel Ban

MEDIA CONTACT:
Eliel Cruz, Director of Communications
ecruz@avp.org, 212-714-1184

The New York City Anti-Violence Project unequivocally condemns The United States Supreme Court’s decision to uphold the unjust, overtly racist travel ban from Iran, Libya, Syria, Yemen, Somalia, Venezuela and North Korea. This policy, enacted by Trump’s Administration through presidential proclamation, is rooted in islamophobia and white supremacy, architected to harm those who are, and perceived to be, Muslim.

Earlier this year, New York City Anti-Violence Project proudly joined an Amicus Brief with Immigration Equality, The National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance, The LGBT Bar Association of Los Angeles, The LGBT Bar Association of Greater New York, The Lesbian and Gay Bar Association of Chicago, GLBTQ Legal Advocates & Defenders, Bar Area Lawyers for Individual Freedom.

As noted in the Amicus Brief, this policy will inflict unique harm on LGBTQ communities by removing potential forms of escape from often life or death situations:

“For LGBTQ individuals, this shutdown is not simply a bureaucratic inconvenience, but potentially a matter of life and death. A family-based visa delayed by the Proclamation is, in effect, a visa denied. Visa approvals thwarted by the Proclamation mean LGBTQ individuals must remain in hostile and unsafe conditions indefinitely, delaying reunification with family members in safe communities. The danger is heightened because merely seeking visas from local consular officials, while citing a same-sex relationship as the basis for a waiver, reveals applicants’ sexual orientations or gender identities to local communities and government officials. Moreover, because the Government will only provide waivers to applicants with ’formal’ and ‘documented’ close familial relationships, LGBTQ individuals — whose relationships are neither sanctioned nor documented by their countries of origin — stand to be disproportionately excluded from these waivers.”

AVP is acutely aware that policies like this one further enables hate violence and puts vulnerable communities at risk. The hateful rhetoric pushed by both the current administration as well as by a growing number of Americans fuels hate violence against those who are, and are perceived to be, Muslim. As an anti-violence organization, as Americans, and as queer people we refuse to stand by while the normalization of this hate based rhetoric grows.

AVP will continue to stand in solidarity with and support our Muslim community members. Join AVP today in New York City in Foley Square at 6pm to #StandWithMuslims.

As always, AVP is here for you. If you experience or witness violence you can always reach out to our 24/7 billingual (English/Spanish) hotline at 212-714-1141. If you need legal services, reach out through the hotline to set up an intake with our Legal Department.

About New York City Anti-Violence Project: AVP empowers lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and HIV-affected communities and allies to end all forms of violence through organizing and education, and supports survivors through counseling and advocacy. We envision a world in which all LGBTQ and HIV-affected people are safe, respected, and live free from violence.

 

 

 

NCAVP condemns the violence of white supremacist groups and mourns the loss of Heather Heyer; calls white LGBTQ people to action

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs condemns the violence of white supremacist groups in Charlottesville, Virginia and mourns the loss of Heather Heyer, who was killed while taking a stand against vitriolic hate.

In this moment, our nation is witnessing the emboldening of white supremacist movements, which have always existed, but are being empowered, amplified, and enabled by the Trump Administration.  We call on everyone, but particularly white LGBTQ people, to call out and resist these vile movements and every hateful action the administration takes that deepens inequities and places marginalized groups at risk of further violence.

NCAVP is deeply familiar with the impact of hate violence. Each year, thousands of LGBTQ and HIV affected people reach out to NCAVP member programs after experiencing violence rooted in bias and hate. We continuously find that the majority of LGBTQ people reporting hate violence are people who hold multiple marginalized identities: LGBTQ people of color, LGBTQ people with disabilities, LGBTQ immigrants, and others. Sometimes the violence is physical, and sometimes it looks like day-to-day bias and harassment that LGBTQ people experience from co-workers, landlords, neighbors and classmates.

Since the election of President Trump, we have seen an increase in hotline calls and an increase in people reporting violence and seeking care and support. We have heard from countless people who have lived their entire lives fearful of experiencing violence based on their identities and experiences, only to have those feelings of fear heightened in recent months. The events in Charlottesville this weekend validated those fears, clearly demonstrating the escalating violence and terror that white supremacist groups are using under this administration in an attempt to maintain their power throughout the country.

Our systems and laws were intentionally created to give white people power and access to resources over people of color, and violence is often used as a tool to maintain that power. The events in Charlottesville did not occur in isolation, but rather were an extension of the violence that we witness every day that is deeply rooted in our society. NCAVP is committed to recognizing historical systems of oppression, such as anti-black racism, anti-Semitism, patriarchy, islamophobia, and xenophobia, in all of our anti-violence work and stand in solidarity with all movements to end white supremacy.

The events of the weekend have only served to further our commitment toward working for the liberation and self-determination of all people impacted by oppression and violence. We will continue to call out any legislators, Trump, and members of his administration who use hateful rhetoric to push forward their agenda and we will hold them accountable for any violence that ensues.  We will continue to fight against any roll backs of protections for LGBTQ people, people of color, immigrant communities and any marginalized group. And we will continue to resist and work to dismantle white supremacy following the leadership of those most marginalized.

NCAVP is a resource for anyone who experiences violence.  For more information, or to locate an anti-violence program in your area, please contact us at info@ncavp.org or visit us online.  Join NCAVP in our efforts to prevent and respond to LGBTQ and HIV-affected violence.  To learn more about our national advocacy and receive technical assistance or support, contact us at info@ncavp.org.

White LGBTQ people: Take a stand against white supremacy

Dear friends,

It has become clear that there is a vacuum of leadership in the White House when it comes to speaking out about the crisis of violence in this country.

It took three days for President Trump to condemn the violence and terrorism of the white supremacists gathered in Charlottesville, Virginia, where three lives were lost, including Heather Heyer, who was killed standing up for justice and peace.

Last week, AVP spoke out about the disturbing fact that there have already been 34 hate-violence-related homicides of LGBTQ people in 2017. In 2016, there were 28—that number excludes the 49 people killed in the Pulse nightclub shooting in Orlando. Again, there was no condemnation or acknowledgement of this crisis from the Trump administration.

This is not a time to be silent. This is a time for all of us—and especially white allies—to fill the vacuum of leadership at the top with calls and actions to end hate and bigotry. This is our time to challenge the white supremacy that has been emboldened, amplified, and empowered by the Trump administration.

To be clear, the “Unite the Right” and related rallies and marches were always planned as violent displays of intimidation by white nationalist groups, angry that the monuments to their icons of bigotry are being rejected across the country.

The white nationalists brought torches and shields and weapons. They chanted anti-Black, anti-Semitic, and anti-gay chants. They were there to inflict violence and abuse, to invoke the historical violence of slavery and lynch mobs, and to cause physical and emotional pain to others.

Today I am asking white LGBTQ people to take a stand against white supremacy and to call it out wherever we see it. Yes, white supremacy looks like a band of Nazis with torches, but it is also looks like the Muslim ban and building a wall. It looks like efforts to reverse affirmative action, gerrymandering, and restricting voting rights of people of color. And white supremacy breeds the homophobia and transphobia that undergirds the current crisis of violence our LGBTQ communities are facing right now. Right now, your voices as allies are critical to let this administration know that a majority of people in this country will not stand by silently while terrorists take over our streets.

I am asking our supporters and communities to call their members of Congress and tell them to denounce and condemn the white supremacist violence in Charlottesville. And I am asking every one of us to find ways to interrupt and disrupt white supremacy and other modes of bigotry and hatred when we encounter them, in any form. We can make our communities safer, but it will take all of us coming together.

Until we are all safe and free,

Beverly Tillery

NCAVP mourns the homicide of Ebony Morgan, a Black transgender woman killed in Lynchburg, VA; the 15th reported killing of a transgender person of color NCAVP has responded to in 2017

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) mourns the homicide of Ebony Morgan, a black transgender woman, killed in Lynchburg, Virginia on July 2nd, 2017. According to the Virginia Anti-Violence Project (VAVP), she was shot and died early Sunday morning at Lynchburg General Hospital. Local media originally misnamed and misgendered Ebony.

“While there is still an active investigation happening into the shooting of Ebony Morgan, perceived and actual gender identity and race often play a role in escalating violence against LGBTQ+-identified individuals.,” said Stacie Vecchietti, Director of VAVP. “VAVP hopes that throughout the investigative process, the media, police, and the public at-large, will respect Ebony’s identity and maintain a level of decorum and understanding when interacting with her family and other individuals who identify within transgender and non-conforming communities. VAVP will continue to stand in solidarity with the family and community of Ebony and other LGBTQ+ individuals that have been impacted by violence.”

If you are in the Virginia area, VAVP offers services for survivors of intimate partner abuse, sexual assault, and stalking, as well as hate/bias motivated harassment and violence. VAVP also has resources to support training and consultation with agencies, community groups, congregations, and other interested organizations. For more information on the Virginia Anti-Violence Project, visit virginiaavp.org, email director@virginiaavp.org, or call (804) 925-9242.

If you are LGBTQ+-identified and you have been impacted by violence, you can contact the Virginia LGBTQ Partner Abuse and Sexual Assault Helpline via text at (804) 793-9999 or by phone at 1-866-356-6998.

NCAVP’s most recent hate violence report, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and HIV-Affected Hate Violence in 2016, recorded 77 total hate violence related homicides of LGBTQ and HIV-affected people in 2016, including the 49 mostly LGBTQ and Latinx lives lost in the shooting at the Pulse Nightclub in Orlando, Florida in June of 2016. Outside of those lives lost during the shooting at Pulse Nightclub, there were 28 homicides of LGBTQ people, an increase of 17% from 24 in 2015. Of the 28 reported non-Pulse hate violence homicides, 79% were people of color, 19 were transgender and gender non-conforming people, and 17 were transgender women of color.

NCAVP is a resource for anyone who experiences violence.  For more information, or to locate an anti-violence program in your area, please contact us at info@ncavp.org or visit us online.  Join NCAVP in our efforts to prevent and respond to LGBTQ and HIV-affected violence.  To learn more about our national advocacy and receive technical assistance or support, contact us at info@ncavp.org.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities.  NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change.  NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

 

NCAVP mourns the intimate partner violence homicide of Gerald Moore in Madison, Wisconsin

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) has learned of the intimate partner violence related homicide of Gerald Moore, which occurred on June 24, 2017. According to local media reports, Gerald died after being stabbed multiple times by Ronald Redeaux. The two were in a relationship, and according to police, officers had responded to domestic disturbances at their home in the past; Redeaux had been arrested for domestic battery.

“We are deeply saddened by the homicide of Gerald Moore,” said Kathy Flores, LGBTQ Anti-Violence Statewide Program Coordinator at Diverse and Resilient. “While we don’t know all the details of this case just yet, we’ve learned Gerald was a victim of intimate partner violence within his relationship before and it is believed this is how he lost his life. There continues to be many barriers for gay victims of violence, particularly gay men of color. A lack of understanding about intimate partner violence in LGBTQ relationships, both within the LGBTQ community and the community at large, continues to exist further causing more isolation of victims when they are unsure of what systems are designed to help them. Unfortunately, when there is a past history of violence in a relationship, it will often escalate. Gay male victims often feel shame about reaching out for help due to damaging messages in our community about what it means to be a male survivor. It is our sincere hope that not one more life is lost to intimate partner violence.”

If you or someone you know is a victim of intimate partner violence in the Wisconsin area, please reach out to the Room to Be Safe LGBTQ Anti-Violence line at 414-856-LGBT (5428). An LGBTQ advocate is available to help with safety planning, support and to help you connect to services within our communities. You can also visit roomtobesafe.org for more information.

“We send love and care to Gerald’s friends and loved ones,” said Essex Lordes, NCAVP Coordinator at the New York City Anti Violence Project. “As a society, the issue of LGBTQ intimate partner violence is often ignored, and if we continue to ignore it, we will have many more tragedies such as this one that could be prevented by more public awareness and less stigmatization. Intimate partner violence is a pervasive part of our community, and it’s our collective responsibility to support and care for each other throughout experiences of intimate partner violence, because we cannot rely solely on police to address it only when it has reached a dangerous level. Bystanders, friends, and family have the capacity to—and must be supported in—intervening around intimate partner violence before it escalates.”

NCAVP’s report Intimate Partner Violence in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, and HIV Affected Communities in 2015, released in October 2016, documented 13 IPV homicides in 2015. Of the thirteen homicides, four of the victims were cisgender men, all of whom were killed by current or former male partners. Additionally, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, lesbians, gay men and bisexual people experience intimate partner violence at the same or higher rates as non-LGB people.

NCAVP is a resource for anyone who experiences violence.  For more information, or to locate an anti-violence program in your area, please contact us at info@ncavp.org or visit us online.  Join NCAVP in our efforts to prevent and respond to LGBTQ and HIV-affected violence.  To learn more about our national advocacy and receive technical assistance or support, contact us at info@ncavp.org.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities.  NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change.  NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the homicide of Ava Le’Ray Barrin, a black transgender teenage girl killed in Athens, GA

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) mourns the homicide of Ava Le’Ray Barrin, a black transgender teenage girl, killed in Athens, Georgia on June 25th, 2017. According to media reports, Ava was fatally shot after an argument with Jalen Brown, an acquaintance. Brown has been charged with her murder and aggravated assault. Ava, who was seventeen years old, is the youngest transgender person killed this year. Friends and family came from as far as Chicago to mourn and remember her life at a vigil in Athens on Monday.

“We send care and support to everyone who knew Ava and has been impacted by this tragic loss,” said LaLa Zannell, Lead Organizer at the New York City Anti-Violence Project. “In mourning Ava’s death, we must take the time now to make space to talk about the root causes of interpersonal, community violence. Though we know to call out hate violence, we need to deepen our analysis of the systemic violence that affects our communities and how it manifests in interpersonal violence, which deeply affects all of us—not just the people at the center of an incident.”

NCAVP’s most recent hate violence report, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and HIV-Affected Hate Violence in 2016, recorded 77 total hate violence related homicides of LGBTQ and HIV-affected people in 2016, including the 49 mostly LGBTQ and Latinx lives lost in the shooting at the Pulse Nightclub in Orlando, Florida in June of 2016. Outside of those lives lost during the shooting at Pulse Nightclub, there were 28 homicides of LGBTQ people, an increase of 17% from 24 in 2015. Of the 28 reported non-Pulse hate violence homicides, 79% were people of color, 19 were transgender and gender non-conforming people, and 17 were transgender women of color.

NCAVP’s most recent intimate partner violence report, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, and HIV-Affected Intimate Partner Violence in 2015, recorded 13 intimate partner violence-related homicides in 2015. Of those homicides, six were transgender women of color.

NCAVP is a resource for anyone who experiences violence.  For more information, or to locate an anti-violence program in your area, please contact us at info@ncavp.org or visit us online.  Join NCAVP in our efforts to prevent and respond to LGBTQ and HIV-affected violence.  To learn more about our national advocacy and receive technical assistance or support, contact us at info@ncavp.org.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities.  NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change.  NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP has learned of the intimate partner violence-related homicide-suicide of Richelle Horsley and Fransiska Dastrup in Salt Lake City, Utah

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) has learned of the intimate partner violence-related homicide of Richelle Horsley and the suicide of Fransiska Dastrup, which occurred the morning of June 22, 2017. According to local media reports, Horsley was found shot in a car next to another vehicle, and Dastrup was found away from the car with a self-inflicted gunshot wound. According to police, the two women were in a relationship and officers had responded to domestic disturbances in the past.

“While we celebrate Pride this month, we must also recognize and address the violence within our community,” said Emily Waters, Senior Manager of National Research and Policy at the New York City Anti Violence Project. “As a society, the issue of LGBTQ intimate partner violence is often ignored, but we know it affects so many of our community members.  We need more conversation and awareness about the unique ways LGBTQ people are affected by intimate partner violence and find ways toward resolution and healing.”

NCAVP’s report Intimate Partner Violence in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, and HIV Affected Communities in 2015, released in October 2016, documented 13 IPV homicides in 2015. Of the thirteen homicides, three of the victims were cisgender women, all of whom were killed by current or former women partners. Additionally, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, lesbians, gay men and bisexual people experience intimate partner violence at the same or higher rates as non-LGB people.

NCAVP is a resource for anyone who experiences violence.  For more information, or to locate an anti-violence program in your area, please contact us at info@ncavp.org or visit us online.  Join NCAVP in our efforts to prevent and respond to LGBTQ and HIV-affected violence.  To learn more about our national advocacy and receive technical assistance or support, contact us at info@ncavp.org.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities.  NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change.  NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP Report on Hate Violence Against Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and HIV-Affected Communities Released Today

Today the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) released its 20th annual report Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and HIV-Affected Hate Violence in 2016. For this report – the most comprehensive of its kind – NCAVP collected data on 1,036 incidents of hate violence against LGBTQ and HIV-affected people from 12 local NCAVP member organizations in 11 states. Key findings include:

  • 2016 was the deadliest year on record for the LGBTQ community.
  • LGBTQ people of color and transgender and gender non-conforming people made up the majority of homicides.
  • There was a 17% increase in homicides of LGBTQ people, not including the lives taken during the Pulse Nightclub shooting.
  • The majority of survivors reporting hate violence to NCAVP member programs in 2016 experienced violence by someone they know.
  • More LGBTQ survivors reported experiencing hate violence online in 2016.
  • Of the LGBTQ survivors who interacted with the police, 66% said that police were indifferent or hostile.

 

Read the full NCAVP 2016 Hate Violence Report here.

Access NCAVP’s Hate Violence in 2016 Advocacy Toolkit for key messages, shareable images, and sample social media posts here.

Read and share NCAVP’s call to action to all people working to end hate motivated violence against LGBTQ communities here.

NCAVP mourns the homicide of Kenne McFadden, a Black transgender woman killed in San Antonio, Texas

Kenne McFadden is the 12th reported killing of a transgender person of color NCAVP has responded to in 2017
The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) mourns the death of Kenne McFadden, a Black transgender woman, killed in San Antonio, Texas.  According to media reports, Kenne was found dead on April 8, 2017. She was originally misgendered and her death was mistakenly classified as a drowning. Her death has been reclassified as a homicide, and a person of interest has been identified by police. Media reports say that Keene’s friend April said that she “always kept us smiling and laughing.”

“Trans Pride Initiative is both saddened and angry to learn of yet another homicide against a young Black trans woman, as well as seeing yet further examples of the police and media misgendering that contributes to anti-trans violence,” said Nell Gaither, President, Trans Pride Initiative in Dallas Texas. “Our thoughts are with the friends and family of Ms. Kenne McFadden as they grieve anew with this update related to her death. Our wishes are for increased empowerment to all who strive to end the stigma, reduce anti-trans violence, and to create a world that respects and celebrates gender diversity.”

NCAVP’s most recent hate violence report, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and HIV-Affected Hate Violence in 2015, recorded 24 reported hate violence homicides of LGBTQ people, a 20% increase from the 20 reported anti-LGBTQ homicides in 2014. Of the 24 reported homicides, 62% of the victims were people of color. Sixteen (67%) of the 24 reported homicide victims were transgender and gender non-conforming. Of the total number of homicides, thirteen (54%) of the victims were transgender women of color.

NCAVP’s 2016 Hate Violence Report will be released on Monday, June 12th, 2017. If you are a member of the media and would like an embargoed copy of the report, please contact Sue Yacka: syacka@avp.org.

NCAVP is a resource for anyone who experiences violence.  For more information, or to locate an anti-violence program in your area, please contact us at info@ncavp.org or visit us online.  Join NCAVP in our efforts to prevent and respond to LGBTQ and HIV-affected violence.  To learn more about our national advocacy and receive technical assistance or support, contact us at info@ncavp.org.

If you are a member of the media, please contact:
Sue Yacka, New York City Anti-Violence Project: syacka@avp.org or 212-714-1184

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities.  NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change.  NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.
###