NCAVP has learned of the possible hate violence homicide of Imer Alvarado, in Fresno, California

NCAVP has learned of the possible hate violence homicide of Imer Alvarado, in Fresno, California
The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) has learned of the possible hate-violence homicide of Imer Alvarado on the night of May 16th in Fresno, California. According to media reports, Imer was fatally shot multiple times, following a dispute with a suspect whom police are currently seeking. Though Imer was dressed in feminine-presenting clothing at the time of his death, friends remember him as being “a beautiful and loving spirit” who was part of the drag community, and say that he identified as a gay man. His life was memorialized in a vigil held by members of the LGBTQ and deaf communities.

“We send our love and support to the friends and loved ones of Imer Alverado,” said Emily Waters, Senior Manager of National Research and Policy at the New York City Anti-Violence Project. “No one deserves to experience violence for who they are or how they present themselves to the world. We must join together to work to end violence against LGBTQ people of all intersecting identities.”

NCAVP’s most recent hate violence report, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and HIV-Affected Hate Violence in 2015, recorded 24 reported hate violence homicides of LGBTQ people, a 20% increase from the 20 reported anti-LGBTQ homicides in 2014.

NCAVP is a resource for anyone who experiences violence.  For more information, or to locate an anti-violence program in your area, please contact us at info@ncavp.org or visit us online.  Join NCAVP in our efforts to prevent and respond to LGBTQ and HIV-affected violence.  To learn more about our national advocacy and receive technical assistance or support, contact us at info@ncavp.org.

If you are a member of the media, please contact:
Sue Yacka, New York City Anti-Violence Project: syacka@avp.org or 212-714-1184

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities.  NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change.  NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.
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NCAVP mourns the homicide of Sherrell Faulkner, a Black transgender woman killed in Charlotte, North Carolina

This is the 11th reported killing of a transgender person of color NCAVP has responded to in 2017.

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) mourns the death of Sherrell Faulkner, a Black transgender woman, killed in Charlotte, North Carolina. According to media reports, Sherrell was found beside a dumpster on November 30th, 2016 with trauma from an assault. She passed away from injuries related to that assault on May 16th, 2017. Sherell’s cousin took to Facebook to mourn the loss of her cousin and say she was an “angel.”

“We send our love and thoughts to the friends, family and loved ones of Sherrell Faulkner,” said Beverly Tillery, Executive Director of the New York City Anti-Violence Project. “As a society we call on everyone one of us to do our part to speak out against this violence and help stop this epidemic. Let’s commit to hiring transgender people of color, making sure they have safe places to live, standing up when we see or hear trans people demeaned and attacked, and simply valuing their lives.”

NCAVP’s most recent hate violence report, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and HIV-Affected Hate Violence in 2015, recorded 24 reported hate violence homicides of LGBTQ people, a 20% increase from the 20 reported anti-LGBTQ homicides in 2014. Of the 24 reported homicides, 62% of the victims were people of color. Sixteen (67%) of the 24 reported homicide victims were transgender and gender non-conforming. Of the total number of homicides, thirteen (54%) of the victims were transgender women of color.

In 2016, NCAVP responded to the homicides of 23 transgender and gender nonconforming people, the highest ever recorded by the Coalition.

NCAVP is a resource for anyone who experiences violence.  For more information, or to locate an anti-violence program in your area, please contact us at info@ncavp.org or visit us online.  Join NCAVP in our efforts to prevent and respond to LGBTQ and HIV-affected violence.  To learn more about our national advocacy and receive technical assistance or support, contact us at info@ncavp.org.

If you are a member of the media, please contact:
Sue Yacka, New York City Anti-Violence Project: syacka@avp.org or 212-714-1184

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities.  NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change.  NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.
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NCAVP mourns the homicide of Mx Bostick, a Black transgender person killed in New York City

This is the 10th reported killing of a transgender person of color NCAVP has responded to in 2017.

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) mourns the death of Mx Bostick, a 59-year-old Black transgender person, who died on May 4th, 2017 from injuries sustained in an attack on April 25th, 2017 in the Chelsea neighborhood of Manhattan. According to media reports, Mx Bostick was found unconscious with head trauma on Tuesday, April 25th. They were taken to Bellevue Hospital, where they died of their injuries on May 4th, 2017.  Their death has been ruled a homicide, an an arrest has been made in connection to the killing of Mx Bostick.

Since first issuing our alert, we have learned that Mx Bostick identified as transgender, and used alternating names to identify themselves. To honor that, we are using Mx, an honorific that does not connote gender.

“Transgender people are targeted all too often for severe and deadly violence,” said Beverly Tillery, Executive Director at the New York City Anti-Violence Project. “We are facing a crisis of violence. Ten transgender people have already been killed so far in 2017 and this must stop. As a society we can stop this epidemic by hiring trans people of color, making sure they have safe places to live and standing up when we see or hear them being demeaned and attacked and simply by valuing their lives. The moment to act is now.”

NCAVP’s most recent hate violence report, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and HIV-Affected Hate Violence in 2015, recorded 24 reported hate violence homicides of LGBTQ people, a 20% increase from the 20 reported anti-LGBTQ homicides in 2014. Of the 24 reported homicides, 62% of the victims were people of color. Sixteen (67%) of the 24 reported homicide victims were transgender and gender non-conforming. Of the total number of homicides, thirteen (54%) of the victims were transgender women of color.

In 2016, NCAVP responded to the homicides of 23 transgender and gender nonconforming people, the highest ever recorded by the Coalition.

NCAVP is a resource for anyone who experiences violence.  For more information, or to locate an anti-violence program in your area, please contact us at info@ncavp.org or visit us online.  Join NCAVP in our efforts to prevent and respond to LGBTQ and HIV-affected violence.  To learn more about our national advocacy and receive technical assistance or support, contact us at info@ncavp.org.

If you are a member of the media, please contact:
Sue Yacka, New York City Anti-Violence Project: syacka@avp.org or 212-714-1184

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities.  NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change.  NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP has learned of the homicide of LGBTQ rights activist Bruce Garnett in Chesterfield, VA

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) has learned of the homicide of LGBTQ rights activist Bruce Garnett, age 67, in Chesterfield, Virginia. According to local NCAVP member organization, the Virginia Anti-Violence Project, Bruce was found stabbed to death in his home on April 21st, 2017, and had been dead for several weeks before he was found. Bruce identified as gay, and had been an early LGBTQ rights advocate and activist in Virginia.

“Older adults, specifically LGBTQ+ older adults, are particularly vulnerable to both isolation and abuse/violence,” said Stacie Vecchietti, Program Director at the Virginia Anti-Violence Project. “All of VAVP’s services are welcoming and accessible to LGBTQ+ adults over 50. This includes our individual/group support and advocacy services, relationship skills classes, wellness events, and survivor retreats. VAVP is also available to provide training to providers of aging services to deepen their organizational capacity to provide affirming and welcoming services to LGBTQ+ older adults.”

Read the full statement from the Virginia Anti-Violence Project here.

NCAVP is a resource for anyone who experiences violence.  For more information, or to locate an anti-violence program in your area, please contact us at info@ncavp.org or visit us online.  Join NCAVP in our efforts to prevent and respond to LGBTQ and HIV-affected violence.  To learn more about our national advocacy and receive technical assistance or support, contact us at info@ncavp.org.

If you are a member of the media, please contact:

Sue Yacka, New York City Anti-Violence Project: syacka@avp.org or 212-714-1184

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities.  NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change.  NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

AVP mourns the death of Mx Bostick, a transgender person of color in Chelsea, Manhattan

AVP has learned of the death of Mx Bostick a 59-year-old Black transgender person in Chelsea. Since issuing our alert, we have learned that Mx Bostick identified as transgender, and used alternating names to identify themselves. To honor that, we are using Mx, an honorific that does not connote gender. According to media reports, a Mx Bostick was found unconscious with apparent head trauma on Tuesday, April 25th, 2017 at 7th Avenue and 29th Street in Manhattan. They were taken to Bellevue Hospital, where they died of their injuries yesterday, May 4th, 2017. There has been an arrest in connection with their homicide.

“Transgender people are targeted all too often for severe and deadly violence,” said Beverly Tillery, Executive Director at the New York City Anti-Violence Project.  “We are facing a crisis of violence. Ten transgender people have already been killed so far in 2017 and this must stop. As a society we can stop this epidemic by hiring trans people of color, making sure they have safe places to live and standing up when we see or hear them being demeaned and attacked and simply by valuing their lives. The moment to act is now.”

AVP has reached out to The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Community Center of New York City, the office of City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito, the office of New York City Councilmember Corey Johnson, the office of Public Advocate Letitia James, the New York City Commission on Human Rights, the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office, the NYPD Hate Crimes Task Force, and the NYPD Community Affairs Bureau.

TAKE ACTION WITH AVP

We all have a role in ending violence. One way to take action right now is to take our Bystander Intervention Pledge, #IWillNotStandBy, to commit to look out for one another, to report anti-LGBTQ violence and discrimination where we witness it, and to intervene in ways that are safe for ourselves and those around us.

If you witness hate violence you can:

  • Assess the situation to see how you can best take action. Only proceed if it is safe to do so in all of these instances.
  • Make your presence known by asking questions and talking to both the victim and the perpetrator.
  • Speak up, be LOUD, and call out what’s happening: identifying violence by name can help deter it.
  • Distract and divert the attacker’s attention by making a scene, and being noisy to draw the attention of others.
  • Record what’s happening by taking video on your phone.
  • Ask what support the survivor needs and provide it if you can.
  • Report the incident to AVP on our 24/7 hotline at 212-714-1141 or our Online Reporting Form. The hotline can also be a resource for the survivor if they so choose.

AVP will be doing outreach in Chelsea in the weeks ahead to hand out safety information and resources.  Additionally, to work on issues of violence in an ongoing way, join AVP’s Hate Violence Community Action Committee, a community and survivor-led working group that addresses hate violence, police violence, hook-up violence, and discrimination against LGBTQ and HIV-affected communities, which meets monthly at AVP. To join us for outreach or to get involved with our Hate Violence Community Action Committee contact LaLa Zannell at lzannell@avp.org.

REPORTING VIOLENCE HELPS END VIOLENCE

AVP encourages you to report violence you experience or witness to our free and confidential 24-hour bilingual (English/Spanish) hotline at 212-714-1141 where you can speak with a trained counselor and seek support, or you can report violence anonymously online, or to ask for a counselor to reach out to you.

Support AVP’s work to make the city safer for LGBTQ and HIV-affected New Yorkers. Donate to AVP today.

NCAVP mourns the homicide of Chay Reed, a Black transgender woman killed in Miami, Florida

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) mourns the death of Chay Reed, a Black transgender woman, killed in Miami, Florida on April 21st, 2017. According to media reports, she was shot while running across the street; her attacker fled the scene. Friends remembered Chay as a funny, caring friend who loved to dance and “was a light, always trying to make everyone around her happy.”

“We send our love and thoughts to the friends, family and loved ones of Chay Reed,” said Emily Waters, Senior Manager of National Research and Policy at the New York City Anti-Violence Project. “There is more awareness than ever of the violence that transgender and gender non-conforming people face, and yet we continue to see a roll back of rights and protections in schools, employment and other areas, as well as transphobic rhetoric being used by political leaders. Every day we have an option to be silent or to be loud and bold in our support for our transgender communities, friends and family members. Now is the time for each of us to choose to be loud and bold.”

NCAVP’s most recent hate violence report, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and HIV-Affected Hate Violence in 2015, recorded 24 reported hate violence homicides of LGBTQ people, a 20% increase from the 20 reported anti-LGBTQ homicides in 2014. Of the 24 reported homicides, 62% of the victims were people of color. Sixteen (67%) of the 24 reported homicide victims were transgender and gender non-conforming. Of the total number of homicides, thirteen (54%) of the victims were transgender women of color.

In 2016, NCAVP responded to the homicides of 23 transgender and gender nonconforming people, the highest ever recorded by the Coalition.

NCAVP is a resource for anyone who experiences violence.  For more information, or to locate an anti-violence program in your area, please contact us at info@ncavp.org or visit us online.  Join NCAVP in our efforts to prevent and respond to LGBTQ and HIV-affected violence.  To learn more about our national advocacy and receive technical assistance or support, contact us at info@ncavp.org.

If you are a member of the media, please contact:
Sue Yacka, New York City Anti-Violence Project: syacka@avp.org or 212-714-1184

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities.  NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change.  NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP learns of the intimate partner violence related homicide of James Johnson in Brooklyn, New York

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) has learned of the intimate partner violence (IPV) related homicide of James Johnson in downtown Brooklyn, New York which occurred on the morning of April 9th, 2017. According to media reports, a 42-year-old-man, identified in the press as the victim’s boyfriend, has been arrested and charged with 41-year-old James Johnson’s homicide. The suspect has stated that he acted in self-defense.

“We are deeply saddened by the homicide of James Johnson and send our condolences to his friends and loved ones,” said Beverly Tillery, Executive Director of the New York City Anti-Violence Project. “While we still do not know exactly what happened in this case, as a society, we must make sure that we are actively working to address LGBTQ IPV before it escalates within LGBTQ relationships. We must also put a spotlight on the experiences of queer, gay, bisexual and transgender men who are often not given access to domestic violence and IPV services and whose realities as survivors are not factored into policy discussions.”

NCAVP’s report Intimate Partner Violence in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, and HIV Affected Communities in 2015, released in October 2016, documented thirteen IPV homicides in 2015. Of the thirteen homicides, four of the victims were cisgender men, three of whom were killed by current or former male partners. Additionally, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, gay and bisexual men experience intimate partner violence at similar if not higher rates as men who identify as heterosexual.

NCAVP is a resource for anyone who experiences violence.  For more information, or to locate an anti-violence program in your area, please contact us at info@ncavp.org or visit us online.  Join NCAVP in our efforts to prevent and respond to LGBTQ and HIV-affected violence.  To learn more about our national advocacy and receive technical assistance or support, contact us at info@ncavp.org.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities.  NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change.  NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP has learned of the possible hate violence homicide of Andrew Nesbitt in Madison, Wisconsin

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) has learned of the possible hate violence homicide of Andrew Nesbitt, age 46, who was found stabbed to death in his apartment in Madison, Wisconsin on March 27th, 2017. According to media reports, police have arrested a suspect, and have not ruled out the possibility of a hate crime.

Andrew was a survivor of a previous incident of hate violence, and he had worked closely with NCAVP member organization, Diverse & Resilient in Madison, Wisconsin to process his experience and tell his story.

“We hold his friends and families close in our hearts as they grieve the loss of Drew, who was such a dear, loving, and sweet person,” said Kathy Flores, LGBTQ Statewide Anti-Violence Coordinator for Diverse & Resilient. “While the motivation for this crime has yet to be reported, Diverse & Resilient is available to offer support for LGBTQ individuals. Diverse & Resilient offers a statewide anti-violence resource call or text phone line for LGBTQ individuals who are victims of all violence or at risk of being victims of violence.”

Diverse & Resilient also encourages people to consider these safety tips if they are heading out, and to remember that even if you follow all of these safety tips and violence happens, it is never your fault.

NCAVP’s most recent hate violence report, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and HIV-Affected Hate Violence in 2015, recorded 24 reported hate violence homicides of LGBTQ people, a 20% increase from the 20 reported anti-LGBTQ homicides in 2014.

NCAVP is a resource for anyone who experiences violence. For more information, or to locate an antiviolence program in your area, please contact us at info@ncavp.org.. Join NCAVP in our efforts to prevent and respond to LGBTQ and HIV-affected violence. To learn more about our national advocacy and receive technical assistance or support, contact us at info@ncavp.org.

If you are a member of the media, please contact: Sue Yacka, New York City Anti-Violence Project: syacka@avp.org or 212-714-1184

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the homicide of Alphonza Watson, a Black transgender woman killed in Baltimore, Maryland

This is the 8th reported killing of a transgender person of color NCAVP has responded to in 2017.

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) mourns the death of Alphonza Watson, a Black transgender woman, killed in Baltimore, Maryland on March 22nd, 2017. According to media reports, she was shot to death in the early morning hours and two men were witnessed fleeing the scene. Alphonza’s mother, Peggy Watson, called her the “the sunshine of our family” and talked about her daughter’s love of cooking and gardening. “She was a very caring, passionate, fun person to be around, always in a talkative and playful mood,” her mother remembered.

“We send our love and thoughts to the friends, family and loved ones of Alphonza Watson,” said Emily Waters, Senior Manager of National Research and Policy at the New York City Anti-Violence Project. “These homicides are happening within the context of a presidential administration that is hostile to transgender people and while religious exemption and bathroom access legislation are sweeping the nation. We must resist an administration and lawmakers who seek to legislate hate and discrimination and we must be louder and bolder than ever in our support for our transgender communities, friends and family members.”

NCAVP’s most recent hate violence report, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and HIVAffected Hate Violence in 2015, recorded 24 reported hate violence homicides of LGBTQ people, a 20% increase from the 20 reported anti-LGBTQ homicides in 2014. Of the 24 reported homicides, 62% of the victims were people of color. Sixteen (67%) of the 24 reported homicide victims were transgender and gender non-conforming. Of the total number of homicides, thirteen (54%) of the victims were transgender women of color.

In 2016, NCAVP responded to the homicides of 23 transgender and gender nonconforming people, the highest ever recorded by the Coalition.

NCAVP is a resource for anyone who experiences violence. For more information, or to locate an antiviolence program in your area, please contact us at info@ncavp.org or visit us online. Join NCAVP in our efforts to prevent and respond to LGBTQ and HIV-affected violence. To learn more about our national advocacy and receive technical assistance or support, contact us at info@ncavp.org.

If you are a member of the media, please contact: Sue Yacka, New York City Anti-Violence Project: syacka@avp.org or 212-714-1184

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP Mourns the Homicide of Jaquarrius Holland, a Black Transgender Woman Killed in Monroe, Louisiana; the 7th Reported Killing of A Transgender Person of Color NCAVP Has Responded to in 2017

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) mourns the death of Jaquarrius Holland, a Black transgender woman, killed in Monroe, Louisiana on February 19th, 2017. Her homicide is only coming to light now, due to local press misgendering the victim. According to media reports, Jaquarrius was shot during a verbal altercation with someone who then fled the scene. Jaquarrius was taken to the hospital, where she was pronounced dead. News of Jaquarrius’ death comes after two homicides of two transgender women, Chyna Gibson and Ciara McElveen, were reported this week in New Orleans, Louisiana. Friends shared memories and stories about Jaquarrius online, many using the hashtag #PrettyBrown, which she used to refer to herself.

“We send our love and thoughts to everyone affected by the death of Jaquarrius Holland,” said Beverly Tillery, Executive Director at the New York City Anti-Violence Project. “As of today, NCAVP has already responded to seven homicides of transgender women of color within the first two months of the year. As a society we can stop this epidemic by hiring trans women of color, making sure they have safe places to live and standing up when we see or hear them being demeaned and attacked and simply by valuing their lives. The moment to act is now.”

NCAVP’s most recent hate violence report, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and HIVAffected Hate Violence in 2015, recorded 24 reported hate violence homicides of LGBTQ people, a 20% increase from the 20 reported anti-LGBTQ homicides in 2014. Of the 24 reported homicides, 62% of the victims were people of color. Sixteen (67%) of the 24 reported homicide victims were transgender and gender non-conforming. Of the total number of homicides, thirteen (54%) of the victims were transgender women of color.

In 2016, NCAVP responded to the homicides of 23 transgender and gender nonconforming people, the highest ever recorded by the Coalition.

NCAVP is a resource for anyone who experiences violence. For more information, or to locate an antiviolence program in your area, please contact us at info@ncavp.org or visit us online. Join NCAVP in our efforts to prevent and respond to LGBTQ and HIV-affected violence. To learn more about our national advocacy and receive technical assistance or support, contact us at info@ncavp.org.

If you are a member of the media, please contact:

Sue Yacka, New York City Anti-Violence Project: syacka@avp.org or 212-714-1184