NCAVP learns of the intimate partner violence related homicide of James Johnson in Brooklyn, New York

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) has learned of the intimate partner violence (IPV) related homicide of James Johnson in downtown Brooklyn, New York which occurred on the morning of April 9th, 2017. According to media reports, a 42-year-old-man, identified in the press as the victim’s boyfriend, has been arrested and charged with 41-year-old James Johnson’s homicide. The suspect has stated that he acted in self-defense.

“We are deeply saddened by the homicide of James Johnson and send our condolences to his friends and loved ones,” said Beverly Tillery, Executive Director of the New York City Anti-Violence Project. “While we still do not know exactly what happened in this case, as a society, we must make sure that we are actively working to address LGBTQ IPV before it escalates within LGBTQ relationships. We must also put a spotlight on the experiences of queer, gay, bisexual and transgender men who are often not given access to domestic violence and IPV services and whose realities as survivors are not factored into policy discussions.”

NCAVP’s report Intimate Partner Violence in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, and HIV Affected Communities in 2015, released in October 2016, documented thirteen IPV homicides in 2015. Of the thirteen homicides, four of the victims were cisgender men, three of whom were killed by current or former male partners. Additionally, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, gay and bisexual men experience intimate partner violence at similar if not higher rates as men who identify as heterosexual.

NCAVP is a resource for anyone who experiences violence.  For more information, or to locate an anti-violence program in your area, please contact us at info@ncavp.org or visit us online.  Join NCAVP in our efforts to prevent and respond to LGBTQ and HIV-affected violence.  To learn more about our national advocacy and receive technical assistance or support, contact us at info@ncavp.org.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities.  NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change.  NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP has learned of the possible hate violence homicide of Andrew Nesbitt in Madison, Wisconsin

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) has learned of the possible hate violence homicide of Andrew Nesbitt, age 46, who was found stabbed to death in his apartment in Madison, Wisconsin on March 27th, 2017. According to media reports, police have arrested a suspect, and have not ruled out the possibility of a hate crime.

Andrew was a survivor of a previous incident of hate violence, and he had worked closely with NCAVP member organization, Diverse & Resilient in Madison, Wisconsin to process his experience and tell his story.

“We hold his friends and families close in our hearts as they grieve the loss of Drew, who was such a dear, loving, and sweet person,” said Kathy Flores, LGBTQ Statewide Anti-Violence Coordinator for Diverse & Resilient. “While the motivation for this crime has yet to be reported, Diverse & Resilient is available to offer support for LGBTQ individuals. Diverse & Resilient offers a statewide anti-violence resource call or text phone line for LGBTQ individuals who are victims of all violence or at risk of being victims of violence.”

Diverse & Resilient also encourages people to consider these safety tips if they are heading out, and to remember that even if you follow all of these safety tips and violence happens, it is never your fault.

NCAVP’s most recent hate violence report, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and HIV-Affected Hate Violence in 2015, recorded 24 reported hate violence homicides of LGBTQ people, a 20% increase from the 20 reported anti-LGBTQ homicides in 2014.

NCAVP is a resource for anyone who experiences violence. For more information, or to locate an antiviolence program in your area, please contact us at info@ncavp.org.. Join NCAVP in our efforts to prevent and respond to LGBTQ and HIV-affected violence. To learn more about our national advocacy and receive technical assistance or support, contact us at info@ncavp.org.

If you are a member of the media, please contact: Sue Yacka, New York City Anti-Violence Project: syacka@avp.org or 212-714-1184

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the homicide of Alphonza Watson, a Black transgender woman killed in Baltimore, Maryland

This is the 8th reported killing of a transgender person of color NCAVP has responded to in 2017.

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) mourns the death of Alphonza Watson, a Black transgender woman, killed in Baltimore, Maryland on March 22nd, 2017. According to media reports, she was shot to death in the early morning hours and two men were witnessed fleeing the scene. Alphonza’s mother, Peggy Watson, called her the “the sunshine of our family” and talked about her daughter’s love of cooking and gardening. “She was a very caring, passionate, fun person to be around, always in a talkative and playful mood,” her mother remembered.

“We send our love and thoughts to the friends, family and loved ones of Alphonza Watson,” said Emily Waters, Senior Manager of National Research and Policy at the New York City Anti-Violence Project. “These homicides are happening within the context of a presidential administration that is hostile to transgender people and while religious exemption and bathroom access legislation are sweeping the nation. We must resist an administration and lawmakers who seek to legislate hate and discrimination and we must be louder and bolder than ever in our support for our transgender communities, friends and family members.”

NCAVP’s most recent hate violence report, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and HIVAffected Hate Violence in 2015, recorded 24 reported hate violence homicides of LGBTQ people, a 20% increase from the 20 reported anti-LGBTQ homicides in 2014. Of the 24 reported homicides, 62% of the victims were people of color. Sixteen (67%) of the 24 reported homicide victims were transgender and gender non-conforming. Of the total number of homicides, thirteen (54%) of the victims were transgender women of color.

In 2016, NCAVP responded to the homicides of 23 transgender and gender nonconforming people, the highest ever recorded by the Coalition.

NCAVP is a resource for anyone who experiences violence. For more information, or to locate an antiviolence program in your area, please contact us at info@ncavp.org or visit us online. Join NCAVP in our efforts to prevent and respond to LGBTQ and HIV-affected violence. To learn more about our national advocacy and receive technical assistance or support, contact us at info@ncavp.org.

If you are a member of the media, please contact: Sue Yacka, New York City Anti-Violence Project: syacka@avp.org or 212-714-1184

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP Mourns the Homicide of Jaquarrius Holland, a Black Transgender Woman Killed in Monroe, Louisiana; the 7th Reported Killing of A Transgender Person of Color NCAVP Has Responded to in 2017

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) mourns the death of Jaquarrius Holland, a Black transgender woman, killed in Monroe, Louisiana on February 19th, 2017. Her homicide is only coming to light now, due to local press misgendering the victim. According to media reports, Jaquarrius was shot during a verbal altercation with someone who then fled the scene. Jaquarrius was taken to the hospital, where she was pronounced dead. News of Jaquarrius’ death comes after two homicides of two transgender women, Chyna Gibson and Ciara McElveen, were reported this week in New Orleans, Louisiana. Friends shared memories and stories about Jaquarrius online, many using the hashtag #PrettyBrown, which she used to refer to herself.

“We send our love and thoughts to everyone affected by the death of Jaquarrius Holland,” said Beverly Tillery, Executive Director at the New York City Anti-Violence Project. “As of today, NCAVP has already responded to seven homicides of transgender women of color within the first two months of the year. As a society we can stop this epidemic by hiring trans women of color, making sure they have safe places to live and standing up when we see or hear them being demeaned and attacked and simply by valuing their lives. The moment to act is now.”

NCAVP’s most recent hate violence report, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and HIVAffected Hate Violence in 2015, recorded 24 reported hate violence homicides of LGBTQ people, a 20% increase from the 20 reported anti-LGBTQ homicides in 2014. Of the 24 reported homicides, 62% of the victims were people of color. Sixteen (67%) of the 24 reported homicide victims were transgender and gender non-conforming. Of the total number of homicides, thirteen (54%) of the victims were transgender women of color.

In 2016, NCAVP responded to the homicides of 23 transgender and gender nonconforming people, the highest ever recorded by the Coalition.

NCAVP is a resource for anyone who experiences violence. For more information, or to locate an antiviolence program in your area, please contact us at info@ncavp.org or visit us online. Join NCAVP in our efforts to prevent and respond to LGBTQ and HIV-affected violence. To learn more about our national advocacy and receive technical assistance or support, contact us at info@ncavp.org.

If you are a member of the media, please contact:

Sue Yacka, New York City Anti-Violence Project: syacka@avp.org or 212-714-1184

NCAVP Mourns the Homicide of Ciara McElveen, a Black Transgender Woman Killed in New Orleans, Louisiana; the 6th Reported Killing of a Transgender/Gender Non-Conforming Person NCAVP Has Responded to in 2017

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) mourns the death of Ciara McElveen, a Black transgender woman, killed in New Orleans, Louisiana on February 27th, 2017. According to media reports, Ciara was found stabbed to death in the 7th Ward. Local media reports originally misgendered Ciara but local advocates and those who knew Ciara worked to correct press accounts. Ciara’s homicide comes only two days after another Black transgender woman, Chyna Gibson, was shot and killed in New Orleans on February 25, 2017. Local transgender activist Syria Sinclaire spoke out about these recent homicides saying “We should have the right to live our lives open and free and not be taunted and traumatized by the general public if they don’t approve.”

BreakOUT!, an NCAVP member organization in New Orleans, issued a statement, addressing both homicides, saying: “BreakOUT! is deeply saddened to hear of the loss of Ciara McElveen and Chyna Dupree, two Black transgender women murdered in New Orleans in less than 36 hours…we have so much other work to do in our communities- we need jobs, housing, education, and access to safe spaces – and yet we continue to have to simply fight for our lives.”

“We are heartbroken for the city of New Orleans, and we send our love and thoughts to the communities who have endured the loss of two members within the space of two days.” said Emily Waters, Senior Manager of National Research and Policy at the New York City Anti-Violence Project. “NCAVP has already responded to more homicides of transgender people in 2017 than we did at this time last year, and the current political context is far more challenging. As we face an administration which devalues the safety and rights of transgender people and people of color, we must work tirelessly to support transgender friends, family, and community members.”

NCAVP’s most recent hate violence report, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and HIVAffected Hate Violence in 2015, recorded 24 reported hate violence homicides of LGBTQ people, a 20% increase from the 20 reported anti-LGBTQ homicides in 2014. Of the 24 reported homicides, 62% of the victims were people of color. Sixteen (67%) of the 24 reported homicide victims were transgender and gender non-conforming. Of the total number of homicides, thirteen (54%) of the victims were transgender women of color.

In 2016, NCAVP responded to the homicides of 23 transgender and gender nonconforming people, the highest ever recorded by the Coalition.

NCAVP is a resource for anyone who experiences violence. For more information, or to locate an antiviolence program in your area, please contact us at info@ncavp.org or visit us online. Join NCAVP in our efforts to prevent and respond to LGBTQ and HIV-affected violence. To learn more about our national advocacy and receive technical assistance or support, contact us at info@ncavp.org.

If you are a member of the media, please contact:

Sue Yacka, New York City Anti-Violence Project: syacka@avp.org or 212-714-1184

NCAVP Mourns the Homicide of Chyna Gibson, a Black Transgender Woman Killed in New Orleans, Louisiana; the 5th Reported Killing of a Transgender/Gender Non-Conforming Person NCAVP Has Responded to in 2017

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) mourns the death of Chyna Gibson, also known by her performing name, Chyna Doll Dupree, a Black transgender woman, killed in New Orleans, Louisiana on February 25, 2017. According to media reports, Chyna, a New Orleans native, was visiting for Mardi Gras and to see her family when she was shot and killed outside of a shopping center. Chyna was a well known and loved performer who toured the country. Following her homicide, there was an outpouring of support and memories of Chyna online. One friend said of Chyna: “My heart breaks as this community must find a way to honor you in death and begin to move forward. The stage will never be the same!”

BreakOUT!, an NCAVP member organization in New Orleans, issued the following statement on Chyna’s homicide: “BreakOUT! is deeply saddened to hear the news of yet another trans woman of color murdered at the same time Penny Proud was killed last year. We are holding healing space for trans and gender non-conforming members while also strategizing ways to keep all trans people safe from both state and street level violence. We continue to assert that we need trans spaces, education, housing, and jobs to keep us safe.”

“We send our thoughts and condolences to Chyna Gibson’s friends and loved ones,” said Shelby Chestnut, Director of Community Organizing and Public Advocacy at the New York City Anti-Violence Project. “Chyna’s is the 5th homicide of a transgender person AVP has responded to in 2017 – all five have been transgender women of color: Black and Native. These homicides are occurring within a national context where the Trump administration is signaling that they will not protect transgender lives or the lives of people of color. We must not be silent, in fact we must be louder and more active than ever in our support for our transgender communities, friends and family members.”

NCAVP’s most recent hate violence report, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and HIVAffected Hate Violence in 2015, recorded 24 reported hate violence homicides of LGBTQ people, a 20% increase from the 20 reported anti-LGBTQ homicides in 2014. Of the 24 reported homicides, 62% of the victims were people of color. Sixteen (67%) of the 24 reported homicide victims were transgender and gender non-conforming. Of the total number of homicides, thirteen (54%) of the victims were transgender women of color.

In 2016, NCAVP responded to the homicides of 23 transgender and gender nonconforming people, the highest ever recorded by the Coalition.

NCAVP is a resource for anyone who experiences violence. For more information, or to locate an antiviolence program in your area, please contact us at info@ncavp.org or visit us online. Join NCAVP in our efforts to prevent and respond to LGBTQ and HIV-affected violence. To learn more about our national advocacy and receive technical assistance or support, contact us at info@ncavp.org.

If you are a member of the media, please contact:

Sue Yacka, New York City Anti-Violence Project: syacka@avp.org or 212-714-1184

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP Mourns the Homicide of Keke Collier, a Black Transgender Woman Killed in Chicago, IL; the 4th Reported Killing of a Transgender/Gender Non-Conforming Person NCAVP Has Responded to in 2017

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) has learned of the homicide of Keke Collier, also known to friends as Tiara Richmond, a Black transgender woman, killed in Chicago, Illinois on February 22, 2017. She was shot to death while walking near her home. Keke’s homicide is the 4rd reported killing of a transgender/gender nonconforming person NCAVP has responded to in 2017. All four homicide victims have been transgender women of color. Local media reports continue to misgender Tiara, but LGBTQ media sources correctly identified Tiara thanks to advocacy from her friends and local community activists.

“We are heartbroken by yet another violent attack leading to the death of a young Transgender woman of color in our beloved community,” said Lisa Gilmore of Illinois Accountability Initiative. “The humanity and personhood of Transgender women needs to be recognized. As Trans women of color are among the most vulnerable in our communities and our nation, we all must be accountable for their safety and access to opportunities.”

“We are deeply saddened by the death of Keke Collier, and we send our thoughts and condolences to her friends and loved ones,” said Shelby Chestnut, Director of Community Organizing and Public Advocacy at the New York City Anti-Violence Project. “At a time when we are seeing the highest number of reports of homicides of transgender and gender non-conforming people, the Trump administration is rolling back protections for transgender youth. This is totally unacceptable. We need to protect transgender lives at all stages, but especially in youth where they experience bullying, family rejection and violence that affects them throughout their lives.”

NCAVP’s most recent hate violence report, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and HIVAffected Hate Violence in 2015, recorded 24 reported hate violence homicides of LGBTQ people, a 20% increase from the 20 reported anti-LGBTQ homicides in 2014. Of the 24 reported homicides, 62% of the victims were people of color. Sixteen (67%) of the 24 reported homicide victims were transgender and gender non-conforming. Of the total number of homicides, thirteen (54%) of the victims were transgender women of color.

In 2016, NCAVP responded to the homicides of 23 transgender and gender nonconforming people, the highest ever recorded by the Coalition.

NCAVP is a resource for anyone who experiences violence. For more information, or to locate an antiviolence program in your area, please contact us at info@ncavp.org or visit us online.

Join NCAVP in our efforts to prevent and respond to LGBTQ and HIV-affected violence. To learn more about our national advocacy and receive technical assistance or support, contact us at info@ncavp.org.

If you are a member of the media, please contact: Sue Yacka, New York City Anti-Violence Project: syacka@avp.org or 212-714-1184

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP Denounces the Trump Administration’s Lack of Support For Transgender Students

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP), which is made up of over 50 lesbian, gay, bisexual transgender and queer (LGBTQ) advocacy groups across the country, denounces the Trump administration’s recent announcement to rescind protections put in place by the Obama administration for transgender students that had allowed them to use facilities, including bathrooms which correspond with their gender identity. This announcement sends a clear message that the Trump administration will not protect the rights of LGBTQ people, particularly LGBTQ youth. LGBTQ youth, especially transgender youth, experience bullying and violence from their peers for their gender identity and expression and higher than average rates of homelessness as a result of family rejection. The actions of this administration only serve to increase these risks.

“Eradicating equal access guidance is tantamount to the violence of rejection and isolation. LGBTQ youth who felt supported and included in their schools were able to personally affirm their gender identity and/or sexual orientation; however, they are now faced with a crushing reality of being forced to endure federal discrimination, increased isolation, ridicule, and bullying,” said Aaron Eckhardt, Buckeye Region AntiViolence Organization (BRAVO) in Ohio. “Simply put LGBTQ youth, especially transgender youth, are being told by the Trump administration that they don’t deserve equal access and equal protection in school despite the fact they are legally required to be in attendance.”

We must understand this action as an attack of LGBTQ civil rights and one that will put all LGBTQ survivors at greater risk for violence, especially transgender students. Any claims that protections for transgender students are a threat to public safety and privacy must be resoundingly rejected. In May of 2016, NCAVP joined hundreds of organizations across the country to stand against HB2 in North Carolina. At that time more than 300 domestic and sexual violence organization signed onto a statement by the National Task Force to End Sexual Domestic Violence condemning these type of anti-trans initiatives, and noting that: “Those who are pushing these proposals have claimed that [they] are necessary for public safety and to prevent sexual violence against women and children. As rape crisis centers, shelters, and other service providers who work each and every day to meet the needs of all survivors and reduce sexual assault and domestic violence throughout society, we speak from experience and expertise when we state that these claims are false.” We do the same today to ensure the rights of transgender students remain a priority throughout our country.

“In recent years so many people have become aware of the diverse needs of students so that all students have the opportunity to succeed academically,” said J Zirbel, at Rainbow Community Cares in North Carolina. “Addressing the needs of transgender students is an important part of that larger effort to promote the health and well-being of our communities and our country.”

It should be noted that regardless of the Trump administration’s most recent announcement, the law remains on transgender students’ side and school districts across the country are still legally obligated to comply with Title IX and protect transgender students.

“While the Trump administration has made it clear that they will not protect the rights of the LGBTQ community, particularly LGBTQ youth, we must make it equally clear that such actions will not be tolerated,” said Shelby Chestnut at the New York City Anti-Violence Project. “NCAVP remains committed in solidarity against this and other attacks on our communities, from transgender students to undocumented survivors and Muslim refugees, our voice and outrage over this administration’s actions will not be silenced in the wake of this onslaught of hate.”

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of over 50 local members programs and affiliate organizations in 25 states, Canada, and Washington DC, who create systemic and social change. We strive to increase power, safety and resources through data analysis, policy advocacy, education, and technical assistance. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

National LGBTQ Organizations Denounce the Arrest of a Transgender Survivor of Domestic Violence By Ice Officers in El Paso, Texas

NATIONAL – The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs and Transgender Law Center denounce the arrest by immigration authorities of an undocumented transgender woman who is a survivor of domestic violence, and call for her immediate release. She was detained last week in an El Paso, Texas courthouse immediately after she was granted a protective order against her abusive partner.

NCAVP’s data shows that transgender women experience high rates of domestic violence and often experience discrimination and violence when attempting to access services. Additionally, transgender women in immigration detention often experience sexual violence, maltreatment, and other forms of violence. Because of these realities, this arrest and detainment is an utterly deplorable and harmful response to her request for help.

This January, Transgender Law Center launched an emergency response project, the Trans Immigrant Defense Effort (TIDE), devoted to expanding legal support for transgender immigrants in the face of new attacks.

“Our government’s actions send the message to transgender people that we are disposable and do not deserve dignity or safety,” said Isa Noyola, Director of Programs at Transgender Law Center. “The community already has limited access to resources when we face violent attacks, particularly by intimate partners. At a time when we grieve murder after murder of transgender women of color, it is unconscionable that a transgender woman would be detained and punished for seeking safety for herself. The community, now more than ever, needs to organize to protect our most vulnerable, in particular transgender immigrant women who are surrounded by violence on a daily basis.”

“Arresting survivors when they are accessing domestic violence protections will only continue to discourage survivors from reaching out for support, especially if they are undocumented,” said Emily Waters, Senior Manager of National Research and Policy at the New York City Anti-Violence Project. “All survivors, including undocumented transgender survivors, deserve to be able access safe and affirming resources without the additional fear of reprisal by abusive partners and criminalization by state authorities.”

Violation of Protections for Undocumented Survivors

According to the County Attorney, Jo Anne Bernal, Immigration Customs Enforcement (ICE) officers received a tip that the woman who was detained would be in the courthouse that day. Bernal also stated that she was arrested while still in the courthouse. Bernal suspects that the tip came from Gonzalez’s abusive partner. Both of these actions by ICE violate the confidentiality protections laid out in the Violence Against Women Act of 2005. VAWA provides explicit confidentiality protections for undocumented survivors, including preventing immigration officers from using information provided by abusive partners and preventing officers from making arrests in courthouses if the survivor is there in connection with a protection order case.

“The actions taken by ICE officials to detain a transgender immigrant while she was at the courthouse getting a restraining order against her abuser, based on a “tip” to ICE possibly from her abuser, are not only outrageous, they violate the law,” said Terra Russell Slavin, Esq., Deputy Director of Policy & Community Building at the Los Angeles LGBT Center. “The Violence Against Women Act contains specific prohibitions on these type of immigration enforcement actions. The LGBT community, its advocates, and domestic violence activists throughout the country will work tirelessly to ensure that immigrant survivors of domestic violence are able to take legal actions to protect themselves from their abusers. We call on our representatives to immediately investigate the actions of ICE officials in this case and to do everything in their power to ensure this travesty doesn’t happen again.”

VAWA protections are vital for the safety of undocumented survivors of domestic violence. Many undocumented survivors face the threat of deportation when accessing protections that are available to all survivors of domestic violence and this threat is often leveraged by abusive partners.

Domestic Violence and LGBTQ Communities

  • According to the most recently released report by NCAVP, of the 13 documented intimate partner violence related homicides of LGBTQ people in 2015, 46% were transgender women, all of whom were transgender women of color.
  • From 2014 to 2015, there was an increase in the percentage of LGBTQ undocumented survivors reporting to NCAVP from 4% to 9%.
  • Many LGBTQ survivors experience violence and discrimination when accessing intimate partner violence resources. Of those seeking shelter in 2015, 44% were denied with the most common reason being gender identity. Nearly one in three survivors who interacted by police were arrested. Read NCAVP’s toolkit for the LGBTQ and HIV Affected Intimate Partner Violence here.

National Resources immigration and LGBTQ Domestic Violence Services

Local Immigration Resources

  • Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights Los Angeles (CHIRLA) (Los Angeles) -888.6CHIRLA
  • CASA Raid Responses (MD, Northern VA, PA): 301.431.4185
  • Illinois Coalition for Immigrant & Refugee Rights (Chicago): 855.435.7693
  • Immigrant Defense Project (New York): 212.725.6422
  • New Jersey Rapid Response Hotline- 1 (800) 308-0878
  • Long Island Dream Act Coalition: 516.387.2043
  • New Sanctuary Movement of Philadelphia: 267.333.9530 (Spanish), 267.345.5248 (Indonesian)
  • Community Defense Line (Travis County, Texas): 512.270.1515
  • Georgia Latino Alliance For Human Rights (Atlanta): 770.454.5232
  • Asian American Advancing Justice (Atlanta): 404.890.5655
  • Southern Poverty Law Center: 800.591.3656
  • San Juan County Immigrant Protection Group: 360.376.7101, 206.365.2225
  • Portland Immigrant Rights Coalition- 1-888-622-1510
  • Houston hotline to report raids- 713-862-8222

National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ), and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of 53 local member programs and affiliate organizations in 25 states, Canada, and Washington DC, who create systemic and social change. We strive to increase power, safety, and resources through data analysis, policy advocacy, education, and technical assistance. NCAVP is coordinated by the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

Transgender Law Center is the largest national organization dedicated to advancing the rights of transgender and gender nonconforming people through litigation, policy advocacy, and public education. TLC changes law, policy, and attitudes so that all people can live safely, authentically, and free from discrimination regardless of their gender identity or expression. www.transgenderlawcenter.org

NCAVP Mourns The Homicide Of Jojo Striker, A Black Transgender Woman Killed in Toledo, OH; the 3rd Reported Killing of a Transgender/Gender Non-Conforming Person NCAVP Has Responded to in 2017

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) has learned of the homicide of JoJo Striker, a Black transgender woman, killed in Toledo, OH on February 8th, 2017; the 3rd reported killing of a transgender/gender nonconforming person NCAVP has responded to in 2017. All three homicide victims have been transgender women of color. Initial reports misgendered JoJo, but recent reports have used her correct pronouns, and though little information is available at the time, JoJo’s mother believes the shooting was a hate crime. Many transgender activists and allies have spoken out in support of JoJo as the news of her death has emerged.

“We are deeply saddened by the death of JoJo Striker, and we send our thoughts and condolences to those impacted by her death,” said Emily Waters, Senior Manager of National Research and Policy at the New York City Anti-Violence Project. “We are already seeing signs that the new administration will be stepping back protections for transgender people. In a moment when we are seeing the highest number of reports of homicides of transgender and gender non-conforming people, we need policies that protect the rights and safety of transgender people – not roll backs.” NCAVP has reached out to the Buckeye Region Anti-Violence Organization (BRAVO), and is offering support.

NCAVP’s most recent hate violence report, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and HIVAffected Hate Violence in 2015, recorded 24 reported hate violence homicides of LGBTQ people, a 20% increase from the 20 reported anti-LGBTQ homicides in 2014. Of the 24 reported homicides, 62% of the victims were people of color. Sixteen (67%) of the 24 reported homicide victims were transgender and gender non-conforming. Of the total number of homicides, thirteen (54%) of the victims were transgender women of color.

In 2016, NCAVP responded to the homicides of 23 transgender and gender nonconforming people, the highest ever recorded by the Coalition.

NCAVP is a resource for anyone who experiences violence. For more information, or to locate an antiviolence program in your area, please contact us at info@ncavp.org or visit us online. Join NCAVP in our efforts to prevent and respond to LGBTQ and HIV-affected violence. To learn more about our national advocacy and receive technical assistance or support, contact us at info@ncavp.org.

If you are a member of the media, please contact:

Sue Yacka, New York City Anti-Violence Project: syacka@avp.org or 212-714-1184

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.