NCAVP mourns the death of Scott DeVore/Scottlynn Kelly DeVore, a 51-year-old gender nonconforming person in Augusta, GA

NCAVP mourns the death of Scott DeVore, a 51-year-old gender non-conforming person who was murdered in Augusta, GA around March 13. Scott also went by Scottlynn Kelly Devore, and had separate Facebook profiles for each name.

Scott had gone missing on March 12 before police discovered the body on March 30. The culprit is currently in police custody, and is being charged for his attack on Scott, as well as for burglarizing his home with one other person.

On Facebook, several friends and family are mourning Scott – “I miss you so much…..it still doesn’t seem real to me. You deserved so much better. I love you❤️” writes one user. “I love you so much I miss you … my best friend my everything,” writes another. According to Facebook, Scott worked as a hairdresser, with people sharing how they miss SCott’s talent, one even sharing an image of a poem titled “Ode to My Hairdresser.” Scott loved singing, and asparagus soup. “I loved, that, you had the ability to walk into a room, look around, and say, no, this will not do. And, within thirty minutes you could make the room look magnificent,” writes a loved one.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the death of Lea Rayshon Daye, a 28-year-old Black transgender woman in Cleveland, OH

NCAVP mourns the death of Lea Rayshon Daye, a 28-year-old Black transgender woman who was found dead in Cuyahoga County Jail in Cleveland, OH on August 30.

Cuyahoga County Jail, where Lea had been held for 105 days, has a longstanding history of neglect, reporting ten wrongful deaths since 2018. Lea’s autopsy and cause of death has still not been released to her family or community.

Local activists are demanding justice for Lea – calling attention to the misgendering that happened in the reports surrounding her death. “Those that knew her said she would have hated that.” Others are drawing attention to Cuyahoga’s history, and the oppressiveness of the prisons in general. “Even the cleanest and most well-staffed jail in the world is still a predatory and abusive institution,” says Chrissy Stonebraker-Martinez from the Cuyahoga County Jail Coalition.


NCAVP stands in solidarity with Black trans women, and we know that it is always hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. We know this can be even more painful when there continues to be an unchecked epidemic of homicides of Black trans women, as police violence is escalating against Black and brown people, and our nation continues to be grappling with the COVID-19 pandemic that highlights long standing healthcare disparities for Black and brown communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP member. If you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilingual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the death of Yunieski “Yuni” Carey Herrera, a 39-year-old Latinx transgender woman in Miami, FL

NCAVP mourns the death of Yunieski “Yuni” Carey Herrera, a 39-year-old Latinx transgender woman who was fatally stabbed by her partner in Miami, FL on November 17. Her partner confessed the crime to authorities, and currently awaits trial – he admits to being under the influence of methamphetamines during the assault, and feels he “deserves the punishment that comes to him.”

Yuni was a well-known activist and performer, with worldwide acclaim as the winner of the Miss Trans Cuba beauty pageant, and later Miss Trans Global in 2019 in Barcelona. Several activists in the Miami area knew Yuni, describing her as “highly motivated,” and a “typical jovial and cheerful Cuban.” A local club owner, Alexis Fernández said Yuni was a performer who knew how to “captivate her audience.” Alexis owns the nightclub Azúcar, where Yuni was expected to make her return after an 8-month-leave due to the coronavirus pandemic. Alexis says the community loved Yuni.

“Besides being strikingly beautiful, she was kind and she was good and she cared as much about others as she would about herself … she was a very special person for many people,” says Yuni’s friend Raul Griffith.

Yuni’s death occurred just three days before the Trans Day of Remembrance.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the death of Asia Jynaé Foster, a 22-year-old Black transgender woman in Houston, TX

NCAVP mourns the death of Asia Jynaé Foster, a 22-year-old Black transgender woman who was fatally shot in Houston, TX on November 20. Unfortunately, Asia’s death coincides with Transgender Day of Remembrance.

Asia was a client of the Montrose Center, a drop-in shelter for LGBTQ youth. On Sunday November 22, the center held a vigil in Asia’s honor. On social media, the org wrote: “Asia was outgoing, funny, and she could put together a read that left everyone around her scrambling to pick up their jaws. We’re saving a seat next to Tracy [another Montrose client lost to violence] for you Asia. We love you.” At the vigil, attendees said Asia was a “beacon of light in their community.” “This will never be forgotten. Asia will never be forgotten,” said another.

In response to Asia’s death, Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee tweeted out her support and condolences. Additionally, she shared that she is “seeking to pass federal legislation to investigate this repetitive national violence against transgender women of color.”
Foster’s death remains under investigation. Police ask that anyone with information call Crime Stoppers at (713) 222-TIPS (8477).


NCAVP stands in solidarity with Black trans women, and we know that it is always hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. We know this can be even more painful when there continues to be an unchecked epidemic of homicides of Black trans women, as police violence is escalating against Black and brown people, and our nation continues to be grappling with the COVID-19 pandemic that highlights long standing healthcare disparities for Black and brown communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP member. If you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilingual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

Today on Trans Day of Remembrance

Today on Trans Day of Remembrance, AVP joins our trans, gender nonconfirming, and non-binary community in rage and resistance as we remember and honor the TGNC lives lost this year. AVP stands alongside and in solidarity with the trans community, its leaders and trans-led organizations, today and everyday, as allies in the fight to end anti-trans violence. 

2020 has been a year of immense grief for our community. It is a year marked by a global pandemic which has claimed hundreds of thousands of lives, exacerbated dire economic and housing instability, and led to isolation in our community. It is a year in which many communities have demanded an end to the anti-Black violence that is deeply entrenched in our society. And it has become the deadliest year for TGNC people in our country, with the number of homicides of TGNC people, of Black trans women, reaching historic levels. 

While we pause today, to remember lives we have lost, we know our work must create conditions that honor the living. Trans women have told us again and again, what they need  to be safe: access to safe and secure housing, employment, healthcare, and education. 

In the world AVP envisions that is free from violence, trans people not only have what they need to be safe, but also have an abundance of resources, and are universally celebrated and loved. We invite our entire community to join us in making this world a reality. 

Join us at the following events to work toward these goals and build community:
  • Become a Bystander/Upstander

Wednesday, December 2nd – 6 pm to 8 pm. Bystander/Upstander Intervention training.  In the aftermath of a turbulent election, a global pandemic, and increasing violence against LGBQ and especially TGNC people, New York City Anti-Violence Project is hosting a virtual Bystander Intervention Training to help community members combat anti-LGBTQ violence and promote communal safety in their communities. Learn and practice verbal de-escalation tactics and intervening against violence targeting people who experienced various marginalized identities and structural barriers. Register here.

  • Support Incarcerated Community Members

Wednesday, December 9th – 6 pm to 8 pm AVP membership meeting and Black and Pink letter writing to queer and trans people who are currently incarcerated. AVP organizers run monthly membership meetings where we plug community members into our campaigns and organizing. RSVP to our letter writing and learn more and get ongoing information on the dates and times of membership meetings by emailing community@avp.org

 

NCAVP mourns the death of Angel Haynes, a 25-year-old Black transgender woman in Memphis, TN

NCAVP mourns the death of Angel Haynes, a 25-year-old Black transgender woman who was fatally shot in a motel in Memphis, Tennessee on October 25. Angel was en route from her hometown of Jackson, TN to visit her best friend Takia Weddle and promised to call her when she arrived in Memphis safely. Takia never heard from Angel – instead, police were called to the Motel 6 in the early morning, where Angel was pronounced dead on scene.

Takia held a vigil in Angel’s honor the following weekend. “I still can’t believe it really because that was the only person I was with every single day. I talked to my best friend more than I talked to my boyfriend,” Takia told a local news station. Angel was a cosmetologist, who was to celebrate her 26th birthday in December. Takia believes Angel was targeted because she is transgender – “in that side of Memphis … Whitehaven, they really don’t like people like that over there really,” “Everybody that knew Angel knew that she was very funny. Very nice to everybody she met,” says Takia.

A GoFundMe has been set up for Angel to cover funeral expenses. The fundraiser reads “Angel was a carefree, caring, determined, funny, smart and giving woman. Unfortunately, our time with her was cut very very short. She was MURDERED!! She was taken away from her mom, grandmother, uncle…she was taken away from all of us unexpectedly.”

Angel’s death marks the 7th transgender woman lost to gun violence in just the last 2 months. Other victims include Sara Blackwood, Mia Green, Brooklyn DeShauna Smith, Felycya Harris, Michellyn Ramos Vargas, and Aerrion Burnett.

Police have asked anyone with information regarding a suspect to contact them at 901-528-CASH.

NCAVP stands in solidarity with Black trans women, and we know that it is always hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. We know this can be even more painful when there continues to be an unchecked epidemic of homicides of Black trans women, as police violence is escalating against Black and brown people, and our nation continues to be grappling with the COVID-19 pandemic that highlights long standing healthcare disparities for Black and brown communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP member. If you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilingual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

Showing up for Ourselves and Each Other: Community Care and Safety Planning in Times Of Crisis

These days, we are all feeling the impact of upheaval, violence, fear, pain, and rage, carrying the weight of it in our spirit, as we work to meet the challenges coming at us each and every day. We all know the challenges — pandemic, uprising, election, violence — even if they affect us differently.  

In the midst of all this, we must show up — for ourselves, and for one another.

During these times, it is especially important to lead with compassion for self, and trust that setting the boundaries for ourselves does not mean we are not in this together. Our community is creative and we are finding innovative ways to support one another and connect, being mindful of safety.  

Showing up for ourselves — Audre Lorde said it best “Caring for myself is not self-indulgence, it is self-preservation, and that is an act of political warfare.” When we show up for ourselves, we also make sure that we are well and whole enough to show up for one another–as another adage goes, you can’t pour from an empty cup. Showing up for ourselves will look different for different people, in different situations.  

Here are a few ideas that you can use if they fit for you:

  • Tune in – Take stock of how you’re feeling physically, mentally, and spiritually, and whether you need rest, care, or support from others, or information to help you make decisions for yourself in this moment.  
    • Reach out for support – showing up for ourselves often means getting support from others, whether that is your chosen family, your pod, a mutual aid group, or an organization like AVP.
    • Spend time doing what makes you feel grounded – Turn to what brings you solace and inspiration, which could be our ancestors, faith, rituals, art,  culture, food, family, pets, friends, community.  
    • Gather information on things that matter to you, from trusted sources–like information on the pandemic from the NYS Department of Health, information on where to go vote, or where to get resources
  • Tune out the things that might be negatively impacting your mental, spiritual, and physical health – this can mean taking a break from social media or other news sources, or limiting when and for how long you tune in, and it might mean not reaching out to people who are sources of conflict for you. 
  • Plan for how to get what you need to increase your safety, health, and wellness – ask for help, and be specific — do you need money, food, information, or some other resource  to increase safety?  More on safety planning in these uncertain times, below.

My Self Check-In Plan

What am I feeling?  Who is in my community?  How can they support me? What do I need?  What are other resources that might be helpful? 

Community Care in Action: No matter what, we show up for each other. In times like these, we need each other.  AVP was founded by community activists when LGBTQ people were being hurt, and no systems were responding. We had to show up for our community, because no one else would. We believe radical healing from pain and rage is possible, if we show up, for ourselves and each other. We know what we need, and we know how to build safety together, even when we are physically distanced. So what are some ways we show up for our community? 

  • Create and maintain connection: Queer, trans, and non-binary folks create chosen family, pods, and community to help avoid isolation when physical distancing may be the key to staying healthy. These connections can be especially helpful if we’re forced to stay in an unsafe living situation, or if we experience violence on the street or at work. Lean on and lean into these connections. Reach out and check in on one another when we can’t physically be together. Set up regular text, phone, or video meet-ups. 
  • Share information and resources: Word of mouth is often the way that our community makes sure folks have access to inclusive and affirming resources and accurate information about what’s happening in the world. Share trusted sources and resources, and if you have more than you need, share food, money, clothing, shelter with others who might need a hand. Pick up groceries or offer child care, if you can. Reach out to organizations, like AVP, the Trevor Project, or the Trans Lifeline to volunteer. 
  • Find the best way for you to act in this moment: We recognize the desperate need to act for positive change in this crucial moment, and also that there are many ways to engage in radical social justice work.  Check out this resource to figure out the best role for you.  
  • Be an Upstander: AVP’s next Bystander/Upstander intervention training is coming up, to help build tools for our community to step up and support each other and interrupt the violence we witness.

Safety Planning-for ourselves and with one another: Safety is multi-dimensional — it’s physical, emotional, spiritual, and economic, and can change moment to moment.  Safety planning simply means we can identify what we need and how we might get it, to feel and be more prepared when in a crisis situation, or when we need extra support.

How do we create a safety plan? Check in with yourself and how you are currently feeling. Try to Identify what needs you might have if a crisis occurs or if you feel like extra support might be helpful during a difficult time. Some questions you might ask yourself are: 

  1. How am I feeling right now? What support do I need?  
  2. What am I afraid might happen?  
  3. Do I feel connected to my support systems or isolated? 

Keep in mind, there is no right answer here. Different people will need different things, and we all show up for each other in different ways. Here are some tips for safety if you are forced to stay with someone causing you harm and how to build safety while protesting.  

AVP is in this with you. If you experience or witness violence, or want to safety plan with us, call our 24/7 English/Spanish Hotline at 212-714-1141 or make a report online, either anonymously, or leave safe contact information, and a counselor will reach out.  If you want to organize with us and take action, email community@avp.org, and follow us on social media Facebook | Twitter  | Instagram.  

NCAVP mourns the death of Carlos “Carlitos” Angelis Jimenez, a 26 year-old Latinx queer man in the Bronx, NY

NCAVP mourns the death of Carlos “Carlitos” Algenis Jimenez, a 26-year-old Latinx queer man who was murdered in the Bronx on September 27. Carlos was in the home of Juan Alonso, a man he had met over a dating app who, after a dispute over sex acts, attacked him with a machete.

Carlos had been missing for 22 days before authorities brought news of his death to his family. The last person to see him was a close family friend, Martha Agurto, who built Carlos a memorial when she heard news of his passing. “I was like his aunt … his friends have been coming by my building to the altar to pay their respects.”

His family has set up a GoFundMe to raise money for funeral expenses, where several loved ones are leaving comments of support and well wishes. “Carlitos was a happy person and loved by everyone who knew him, a good, noble person from good heart incapable of harm or hurt anyone,” writes his longtime friend Roqueline Rodriguez. The fundraiser hopes to cover costs to send Carlos’ body to the Dominican Republic, where most of his family resides. Carlos was living with his father in Jersey City.

“He was full of joy, funny jokes, always laughing. he had such an amazing vibe,” writes one supporter. “Carlitos was a beautiful person. He will be missed.” writes another.


NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the death of Jonathan Breeding, a 23 year-old-man gay man in Waco, Texas

NCAVP mourns the death of Jonathan Breeding, a 23-year-old queer man who was fatally shot in Waco, Texas on August 17. Jonathan was the victim of a series of shootings orchestrated by Damarion Degate, who lured three different men to meet up using the dating app, Grindr. Jonathan was the only victim who passed away.

Around 2 a.m., police found Jonathan after he had crashed his car into a pole while attempting to drive after his attack. Jonathan’s attacker was initially arrested in August in connection with one of the non-lethal shootings, and has now been charged with murder, according to a statement released by the Waco Police Department. In an earlier statement the police urged citizens to be cautious when using dating apps, “in particular those that cater to the LGBT+ community. We strongly recommend arranging online dating meetings in public venues.”

A GoFundMe scholarship is being set up in Jonathan’s honor at Waco High School, where he graduated in 2015. The organizer, Julia Hunter Therrell, plans to award the scholarship to class presidents of the school until the fund runs out. “Jonathan was the most free-spirited, loving and unique young man, He was a friend to all he met. The world lost one of the best,” writes Julia. The post is accompanied by a series of quotes on Jonathan’s loss and character. “”I still can’t believe he’s gone! Sooo young and his heart was sooo beautiful You will never be forgotten baby! RIP Jon Breeding,” reads one. “Rest beautifully, and light up Heaven with your vibrant, unmatched, and bold personality Jon Breeding! We love you. Always,” reads another.


NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the death of Sara Blackwood, a 29-year-old transgender woman in Indianapolis, IN

NCAVP mourns the death of Sara Blackwood, a 29-year-old transgender woman who was fatally shot in Indianapolis on October 11th. Sarah was walking home from a shift at Long John Silver’s, where she worked, when she was killed.

Someone close to Sara reached out to publication Planet Transgender to provide some context around the attack and what authorities have communicated to her long-term domestic partner Avery Ellis Blackwood.

“Last night, Sara Blackwood was walking home when she was shot and killed. The homicide detectives have not told Avery much about what happened exactly, so they don’t know for sure.”
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“What they do know, is that Sara was shot, and alive at the scene. However, she died during emergency surgery at the hospital. This is the extent of Avery’s knowledge on what happened.”
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“I am writing this on behalf of Avery Ellis Blackwood, to make this devastating situation a little easier for them by not having to repeat the news over and over again.”

Friends described Sara to that same publication as “shy” and someone who loved anime, also indicative of her Facebook, in which several of her profile pictures are that of anime characters. On her social media, she describes herself as “A MLP:FiM [My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic] obsessed town girl fed up with capitalism. Also I miss role playing & videogames.” As of yesterday, Avery’s profile picture has been updated to a character from the cartoon show crying. On her death A former coworker of Sarah’s told a local news station “The world at large is missing a very kind, responsible person.”

Anyone with additional information has been encouraged to call IMPD at 317-327-3811.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.