NCAVP mourns the death of 18-year-old transgender woman Nikki Kuhnhausen in Clark County, Washington.

NCAVP mourns the death of 18-year-old transgender woman Nikki Kuhnhausen in Clark County, Washington. According to media reports, Nikki Kuhnhausen has been missing since June after meeting with a man she met off of snapchat. A search coordinated by the National Women’s Coalition Against Violence and Exploitation (NWCAVA) led to her body being found earlier this week. 

Nikki Kuhnhausen’s parents, Lisa and Vincent Woods, worked diligently to find their missing daughter, passing out flyers at pride parades and throughout the community. “Nikki had my heart from the moment she was born,” Lisa Woods told media. “She’s been my special child and she keeps me knowing I am worth something.” 

Our deepest condolences to the family and friends of Nikki Kuhnhausen. Donations can be made in Nikki’s name to NWCAVE and will be used for funeral costs. 

We know it can be hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP member. If you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilngual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

 

LGBTQ, Women, and Survivor Advocates Celebrate the Many New Yorkers Who Will No Longer Suffer the Harms of Money Bail & Pretrial Jailing

December 3, 2019

LGBTQ, Women, and Survivor Advocates Celebrate the Many New Yorkers Who Will No Longer Suffer the Harms of Money Bail & Pretrial Jailing

New York – Today, leading LGBTQ, women, and survivor advocacy organizations, including Girls for Gender Equity, The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Community Center, New Hour for Women & Children Long Island, NYC Anti-Violence Project, Violence Intervention Program, Inc., Women’s Prison Association, and Black Lives Matter (BLM) Hudson Valley,  released the following statement about the bail reform measures which will go into effect in January, 2020:

“We are survivors fighting for a better, safer and more just New York – and we know that this requires transforming our discriminatory pretrial system.

As advocates serving thousands of  survivors of intimate partner and sexual violence a year, including Black and Latinx, immigrant, LGBTQ and gender non-binary New Yorkers, we fought for transformative bail reform in New York State, calling for the elimination of money bail and the implementation of a pretrial system that substantially limits pretrial incarceration and ensures due process and individualized justice. With support from the vast majority of residents across the state, bail reform legislation enacted last session and will go into effect on January 1st.

Rather than celebrate the work of New Yorkers to end the criminalization of poverty and protect the presumption of innocence, the District Attorneys Association of the State of New York (DAASNY) has tried to stymie the implementation of the new reforms by stoking fear about “public safety.”

However, as advocates and people who have been impacted by intimate partner violence, we know that Black and Latinx, immigrant, LGBTQ, and women survivors are often themselves criminalized and that pretrial incarceration can undermine the safety of survivors. Mandatory arrest laws and cursory primary-aggressor assessments by law enforcement mean that survivors are often arrested instead of – or in addition to –  the person engaging in a pattern of abusive partner behavior. The Family Violence Program of the Urban Justice Center in New York City found that survivors of IPV had been arrested in 27% of cases received through their hotline in a two-year period. 85% of survivors arrested had a prior documented history of being subjected to domestic violence, and 85% were injured during the incident that led to their arrest.

As anti-violence organizations, we know that pretrial jailing can be deadly. According to the Bureau of Justice, 471 New Yorkers died in county jails between 2000 and 2014. The State Commission on Correction has found that “gross incompetence” cost the lives of people in jails from Nassau to Onondaga, including India Cummings in Erie County and Layleen Polanco in New York City.

Pretrial incarceration also harms children and families. The vast majority – 80% – of incarcerated and detained women are  mothers and primary caregivers. Even a few days of pretrial detention can result in the loss of employment and housing and the initiation of child neglect cases with devastating long-lasting impacts on the financial stability, health and well-being of families.

We are acutely aware that too often, survivors’ experiences are exploited when prosecutors work to pass laws to give themselves broad discretion and leverage in court in order to increase convictions. Every day, we hear from survivors that what they really need is economic stability, housing, health care, and trauma-informed services.

If District Attorneys are interested in supporting survivors, they need to listen to us and fight for emergency shelter and long-term housing, economic justice, and access to robust healthcare.

This is what survivors need. This is what New York State needs.”

https://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/mlj0014st.pdf

https://www.prisonpolicy.org/blog/2018/05/13/mothers-day-2018/

NCAVP mourns the death of 23-year-old Bee Love Slater, a Black transgender woman in Clewiston, FL

NCAVP mourns the death of 23-year-old Bee Love Slater, a Black transgender woman in Clewiston, FL whose life was tragically taken on September 1, 2019.

According to reports, Bee Love Slater, was identified by authorities after her body was found in the remains of an apparent car fire. Her gruesome death is currently under investigation as a homicide. Close friend, Kenard Wade, told media that Love was proud of her transition but had recently become fearful after receiving disturbing text messages on the night of her death. Another friend of Love’s, Desmond Vereen, remembered Love was “a people person.” Vereen, said, “she loved to be around people, and meeting new people, too, because of her new lifestyle that she transitioned into.” Vereen held a memorial for Love and made a vow to keep her memory alive. Our deepest condolences are with the family and friends of Bee Love Slater. She is the 18th reported death of a transgender person this year.

We know it can be hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP memberIf you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilngual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the death of 30-year-old Brianna BB Hill, a Black transgender woman in Kansas City, MO

NCAVP mourns the death of 30-year-old Brianna BB Hill, a Black transgender woman in Kansas City, MO whose life was tragically taken on October 14, 2019.

According to Kansas City Police the man custody shot and killed Brianna is in custody after waiting for the police to arrive at the scene for his arrest. The suspect remains unnamed and details are developing. Investigators are seeking a motive for the shooting. Hill is at the very least the 21st known transgender person killed in the United States this year. The majority of which are Black women. Our deepest condolences are with the family and friends of Brianna BB Hill.

We know it can be hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP memberIf you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilngual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the death of Bubba Walker, a Black transgender woman in Charlotte, NC

NCAVP mourns the death of Bubba Walker, a Black transgender woman in Charlotte, NC whose life was tragically taken.

According to reports, Bubba’s life was lost in a house fire that is currently being investigated as a homicide. Bubba’s remains were found September 10th and the date of her death is currently unknown. Clarabelle Catlin, who knew her personally said Bubba was homeless at the time of her death and added, “She was a kind soul, She was always smiling and was a people person. She lit up everywhere she went and everyone loved her.” Our condolences are with Bubba Walker’s family and friends.

We know it can be hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP memberIf you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilngual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the death of 29-year-old Itali Marlowe, a Black transgender woman in Houston, TX

NCAVP mourns the death of 29-year-old Itali Marlowe, a Black transgender woman in Houston, TX whose life was tragically taken on September 20, 2019, According to reports, Itali Marlowe died after sustaining multiple gunshot injuries in Houston. The 29-year-old was found near her home in a driveway, after her roommate was seen fleeing the scene. Local police and the Fort Bend County District Attorney’s Office have identified 23-year-old Raymond Donald Williams, Marlowe’s roommate at the time of the shooting, and charged him with murder.

Marlowe is the fourth trans woman to be murdered in Texas this year, following Muhlaysia BookerChynal Lindsey, and Tracy Single. Our condolences are with the family and friends of Itali Marlowe. 

We know it can be hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP memberIf you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilngual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the death of 20-year-old Elisha Stanley, a Black transgender woman in Pittsburgh, PA

NCAVP mourns the death of 20-year-old Elisha Stanley, a Black transgender woman in Pittsburgh, PA whose life was tragically taken on September 16, 2019. Elisha was based in Washington, DC, and worked as a community mental health worker at MBI Health Services, LLC. While details of Stanley’s alleged murder remain unclear to authorities, many community members are reporting Elisha’s untimely death as a homicide. A Pittsburgh Bureau of Police spokesperson told PinkNews: “Police are aware of the death and detectives are investigating. The cause and manner of death will come from the Allegheny County Medical Examiner.” Our condolences are with the family and friends of Elisha Stanley.

We know it can be hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP memberIf you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilngual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the death of Ja’leyah-Jamar, a Black gay gender non-conforming man in Kansas City, MO

NCAVP mourns the death of Ja’leyah-Jamar, a Black gay cisgender man in Kansas City, MO whose life was tragically taken on September 13, 2019.

At a vigil in his honor, Ja’leyah-Jamar’s mother, Jennifer Gibson, called for an end to violence, saying, “Once that trigger is pulled, it’s too late. You can’t go back. Put the guns down.” Ja’leyah leaves behind a five-year-old child.

The Kansas City Anti-Violence Project posted in a statement on Facebook: “As we hold space to remember and uplift Ja’Leyah, we must also recognize the factors at play that contribute to the dramatically increased risk of violence that trans women of color — especially Black trans women — face everyday. Restrictions on basic needs and services like housing, employment, safe streets, healthcare, and protection under the law are just some barriers that put our sisters in harm’s way daily. The discriminatory and violent systems that perpetuate violence against transgender women of color are a direct result of bias from within and outside our own communities.”

We know it can be hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP memberIf you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilngual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the death of 17-year-old Bailey Reeves, a Black transgender woman in Baltimore, MD

NCAVP mourns the death of 17-year-old Bailey Reeves, a Black transgender woman in Baltimore, MD whose life was tragically taken on September 2, 2019.

According to local reports, Bailey Reeves and friends were met with violence on Labor Day when Bailey was shot to death. Reeves’ death raises the number of trans peopled killed to 17, most of which are Black trans women. The majority of deaths have been due to gun violence. As more details of the story develop, our condolences are with Bailey Reeves’ family, friends, and community.

We know it can be hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP memberIf you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilngual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the death of 43-year-old Therese Bradley Horton, a Black queer woman in Atlanta, GA

NCAVP mourns the death of 43-year-old Therese Bradley Horton, a Black queer woman in Atlanta, GA whose life was tragically taken on August 4, 2019.

According to local reports, Therese Bradley Horton became a victim of fatal intimate partner violence when her girlfriend, Candace Morgan, 35, chased and shot her outside of an entertainment complex in Atlanta, GA. Morgan is currently charged with murder and investigations are ongoing. NCAVP’s latest report, issued earlier this year, Hate Violence and Intimate Partner Violence in LGBTQ and HIV-affected Communities in 2017, highlights LGBTQ people’s risk for severe and fatal intimate partner violence, as well as hate violence. Our condolences are with Therese Horton’s family, friends, and community.

We know it can be hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP memberIf you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilngual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.