AVP Action Brief: Transgender people are not a “burden” or a “distraction”

The AVP Action Brief tracks actions of the Trump administration that impact our communities’ safety and rights and offers concrete steps that we can take to stand up for safety and justice.

We are here for you and we are in this together.

The federal government is taking actions this week to make the country less safe and more hostile for LGBTQ people with two serious threats: to bar transgender people from military service, and to exclude LGBTQ people from civil rights protections in the workplace. Find out more and take action below.

Transgender people are not a “burden” or a “distraction”

This morning, President Trump announced on Twitter that he intends to ban transgender people from serving in the military. The president cited “tremendous medical costs” and “disruption” of having transgender people serve in the military to justify this action. Transgender people are not a “burden” or a “disruption,” and this kind of language coming from the president puts the safety of our communities at risk. Further, transgender people deserve access to health care and employment, both of which are being undermined by this new Trump pronouncement and time and again by the policies of this administration. While we don’t know exactly how Trump’s tweets will play out in terms of policy, we do know that they create a nation that is more hostile and more discriminatory towards transgender and gender non-conforming people, and this is unacceptable. AVP has signed on in support of tonight’s NYC Rally Against Trump Decision to Ban Trans Military Service. Come out – 5pm in Times Square – and let your voice be heard!

Sessions continues to try to roll back LGBTQ protections in the workplace

This week, it appears Attorney General Jeff Sessions will try to limit the protections for LGBTQ people have against discrimination in the workplace. Sources close to Session state that the Justice Department plans to file a brief in an employment discrimination case before the U.S. Second Circuit Court of Appeals claiming that LGBT workers are not protected by Title VII, a civil rights law that bars discrimination in employment. This action would try to reverse recent interpretations of Title VII by former Attorney general Eric Holder, The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, and numerous courts.

In NCAVP’s most recent report, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and HIV-Affected Hate Violence in 2016, more than 1 in 6 LGBTQ people who reported experiencing violence to NCAVP said that they had experienced violence in the workplace. With such a large percentage of hate violence against LGBTQ people occurring in the workplace, this attempt to roll back protections puts our community at greater risk for bias, harassment, discrimination, and violence.

Here’s what you can do.

  • Tweet at Trump and your representatives using the #ProtectTransTroops and let them know that you do not support reinstating the ban on transgender people serving in the military.
  • Use #ValueTransLives in your calls to action to honor and uplift the transgender and gender non-conforming people in our communities, workplaces, and families.
  • Read our latest report to get the full picture of hate violence and learn more.
  • Report violence you experience or witness to AVP and Communities Against Hate.
  • If you know someone who is an LGBTQ survivor of violence who is experiencing trauma or fear as a result of these recent actions, encourage them to contact AVP’s confidential 24-hour English/Spanish hotline at (212) 714-1141. They will be connected with a counselor who understands the ways this political climate is affecting our communities.
  • Get involved—volunteer with AVP!
  • Support AVP: Give now to ensure our voices are heard.
  • Forward this email to a friend. Ask them to sign up for the AVP Action Brief to stay informed and activated, too. 

NCAVP mourns the homicide of Kenne McFadden, a Black transgender woman killed in San Antonio, Texas

Kenne McFadden is the 12th reported killing of a transgender person of color NCAVP has responded to in 2017
The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) mourns the death of Kenne McFadden, a Black transgender woman, killed in San Antonio, Texas.  According to media reports, Kenne was found dead on April 8, 2017. She was originally misgendered and her death was mistakenly classified as a drowning. Her death has been reclassified as a homicide, and a person of interest has been identified by police. Media reports say that Keene’s friend April said that she “always kept us smiling and laughing.”

“Trans Pride Initiative is both saddened and angry to learn of yet another homicide against a young Black trans woman, as well as seeing yet further examples of the police and media misgendering that contributes to anti-trans violence,” said Nell Gaither, President, Trans Pride Initiative in Dallas Texas. “Our thoughts are with the friends and family of Ms. Kenne McFadden as they grieve anew with this update related to her death. Our wishes are for increased empowerment to all who strive to end the stigma, reduce anti-trans violence, and to create a world that respects and celebrates gender diversity.”

NCAVP’s most recent hate violence report, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and HIV-Affected Hate Violence in 2015, recorded 24 reported hate violence homicides of LGBTQ people, a 20% increase from the 20 reported anti-LGBTQ homicides in 2014. Of the 24 reported homicides, 62% of the victims were people of color. Sixteen (67%) of the 24 reported homicide victims were transgender and gender non-conforming. Of the total number of homicides, thirteen (54%) of the victims were transgender women of color.

NCAVP’s 2016 Hate Violence Report will be released on Monday, June 12th, 2017. If you are a member of the media and would like an embargoed copy of the report, please contact Sue Yacka: syacka@avp.org.

NCAVP is a resource for anyone who experiences violence.  For more information, or to locate an anti-violence program in your area, please contact us at info@ncavp.org or visit us online.  Join NCAVP in our efforts to prevent and respond to LGBTQ and HIV-affected violence.  To learn more about our national advocacy and receive technical assistance or support, contact us at info@ncavp.org.

If you are a member of the media, please contact:
Sue Yacka, New York City Anti-Violence Project: syacka@avp.org or 212-714-1184

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities.  NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change.  NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.
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NCAVP mourns the homicide of Sherrell Faulkner, a Black transgender woman killed in Charlotte, North Carolina

This is the 11th reported killing of a transgender person of color NCAVP has responded to in 2017.

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) mourns the death of Sherrell Faulkner, a Black transgender woman, killed in Charlotte, North Carolina. According to media reports, Sherrell was found beside a dumpster on November 30th, 2016 with trauma from an assault. She passed away from injuries related to that assault on May 16th, 2017. Sherell’s cousin took to Facebook to mourn the loss of her cousin and say she was an “angel.”

“We send our love and thoughts to the friends, family and loved ones of Sherrell Faulkner,” said Beverly Tillery, Executive Director of the New York City Anti-Violence Project. “As a society we call on everyone one of us to do our part to speak out against this violence and help stop this epidemic. Let’s commit to hiring transgender people of color, making sure they have safe places to live, standing up when we see or hear trans people demeaned and attacked, and simply valuing their lives.”

NCAVP’s most recent hate violence report, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and HIV-Affected Hate Violence in 2015, recorded 24 reported hate violence homicides of LGBTQ people, a 20% increase from the 20 reported anti-LGBTQ homicides in 2014. Of the 24 reported homicides, 62% of the victims were people of color. Sixteen (67%) of the 24 reported homicide victims were transgender and gender non-conforming. Of the total number of homicides, thirteen (54%) of the victims were transgender women of color.

In 2016, NCAVP responded to the homicides of 23 transgender and gender nonconforming people, the highest ever recorded by the Coalition.

NCAVP is a resource for anyone who experiences violence.  For more information, or to locate an anti-violence program in your area, please contact us at info@ncavp.org or visit us online.  Join NCAVP in our efforts to prevent and respond to LGBTQ and HIV-affected violence.  To learn more about our national advocacy and receive technical assistance or support, contact us at info@ncavp.org.

If you are a member of the media, please contact:
Sue Yacka, New York City Anti-Violence Project: syacka@avp.org or 212-714-1184

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities.  NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change.  NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.
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#ValueTransLives

Vickie Cruz, star of The Death and Life of Marsh P. Johnson and former AVP Senior Counselor/Advocate sat down with Executive Director Beverley Tillery and Lead Organizer LaLa Zannell to discuss valuing trans lives in the past, present and future.  Watch their conversation below.

Help us honor the lives of Marsha P. Johnson, Sylvia Rivera, and other transgender leaders by joining us to #ValueTransLives.  Check out our campaign and let us know how you plan to value trans lives! We’ll be sharing responses back to you and the rest of our community here.