NCAVP mourns the death of 21-year-old Te’a Denise Liger, a Black queer woman in Atlanta, GA

NCAVP mourns the death of 21-year-old Te’a Denise Liger, a Black queer woman in Atlanta, GA whose life was tragically taken on August 21, 2019.

Te’a is remembered as a star athlete, musical artist, and recent graduate from Kell High School in Marietta. She was also a student at the Academy of Art University in San Francisco. According to local reports, Te’a was one of three people who was robbed and assaulted before succumbing to fatal injuries after being shot. Her mother mournfully told WSB-TV, “She was an artist in every way, painting, music and was the brightest spirit… They took her away from her brothers and she won’t be a hashtag or a face on a shirt. She wanted to be a change.” As investigations continue, police have charged one man with multiple counts of assault.

We know it can be hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP memberIf you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilngual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the death of 22-year-old Jordan Cofer, a white transgender man in Dayton, OH

NCAVP mourns the death of 22-year-old Jordan Cofer, a white transgender man who was one of the  victims in the Dayton, OH mass shooting, August 4, and sibling of the shooter. While it is not apparent whether biased played a role in Jordan’s death, he is the 14th known transgender person to die by way of homicide. A close friend remembers Jordan as, “one of the sweetest people you would ever meet, a true saint… He tried to give the best to everyone.”

The National Center for Transgender Equality released the following statement about Jordan’s death: “We are deeply saddened to hear of the loss of Jordan as well as eight others in this tragic and violent act. Mass gun violence is an epidemic in this country and deserving of swift and immediate action by lawmakers at all levels of government. We join the nation in mourning for every community impacted by gun violence.”

We know it can be hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP memberIf you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilngual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the death of 22-year-old Tracy Single, a Black transgender woman in Houston, TX

NCAVP mourns the death of 22-year-old Tracy Single, a Black transgender woman in Houston, TX whose life was tragically taken on July 30, 2019. Reports of Tracy’s death are making media two weeks following her death thanks to the work of Houston-based journalist and organizer Monica Roberts of TransGriot. In initial reports of the homicide, Tracy was not identified as trans.

The City of Houston is honoring Tracy’s life by displaying the trans pride flag colors on City Hall. If you have any information on her death, local organizers are encouraging folks to call Houston Crime Stoppers at 713-222-TIPS (8477).

We know it can be hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP member. If you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilngual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

A Special NCAVP Report on Anti-LGBTQ Violence During Pride

This year, Pride celebrations around the country marked June as the 50th anniversary of Stonewall and New York City hosted the international community for a World Pride celebration. While our communities experienced an increase in visibility, Pride season was also marked by repeated reports of violence in the LGBTQ community. 

Today, the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) is releasing a special report, Pride and Pain: A Snapshot of Anti-LGBTQ Hate and Violence During Pride Season 2019. This report outlines the incidents and trends of violence documented nationally in the two-month period from May 15 to July 15, 2019

Beverly Tillery, New York City Anti-Violence Project’s (AVP) Executive Director said:

“It’s important to remember that violence against the LGBTQ communities continues and in some cases is intensifying. For many of us Pride is a time for celebration, a time to honor our roots in the Stonewall Rebellion, and a reminder of the important legislative and cultural victories that are worth celebrating. This Pride season, we were reminded over and over again of the violence that plagues our community, particularly transgender members of the  community. This snapshot provides another window into the various forms of violence our community faces, and shows how the visibility of Pride season can sometimes lead to greater targeting and attacks.”

Report Summary: 

  • 14 homicides from May 15 – July 15, 2019 including 7 homicides of Black trans women. This was an average of nearly 2 (1.75) homicides each week and more than three times the hate violence homicides recorded between January 1 and May 14, 2019
  • 2 fatalities of trans women of color while in detention, Johana Medina and Layleen Polanco
  • 6 dating, hook-up, and intimate partner violence related incidents
  • 22 anti-LGBTQ protests at pride activities, drag queen story hours, and LGBTQ establishments

 

Ericka Dixon, NCAVP National Capacity Building Coordinator said: “While we recognize that there is no way to know and account for all LGBTQ people who have been targeted and harmed, we can raise and amplify the stories we do know. NCAVP tracks these incidents of violence nationally as a way to better understand how violence impacts LGBTQ and HIV-affected people. This informs our work in preventing and responding to incidents of violence against our community, and in educating LGBTQ people and our allies on ways to create systemic and social change.”

The full snapshot can be found here: avp.org For Media Inquiries contact Eliel Cruz at ecruz@avp.org

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

AVP Client Receives Settlement from City of New York DHS for Anti-Trans Discrimination

New York City Anti-Violence Project’s client, Stevin Bonifacio, has reached a settlement with the City of New York Department of Homeless Services for anti-trans discrimination he experienced in the city’s homeless shelter system. His complaint, filed through the City Commission on Human Rights, includes financial compensation and important trans specific policy changes that will have long standing impact on the trans, gender nonconforming, and intersex (TGNCI) homeless population in New York City.

Bonifacio’s fight for personal relief and housing justice in New York City has been four years in the making. In February of 2015, Bonifacio lost his means of transportation resulting in the loss of his job as a delivery driver. Having lost his source of income, he became homeless in May 2015, and sought out shelters as a way to sustain himself, first going to the Department of Homeless Services (DHS) Men’s Intake Shelter in June 2015.

After spending a night in a temporary shelter, Bonifacio was placed in his permanent shelter at a Quality Inn through Acacia Group, a DHS provider. It was at Acacia that Bonifacio asked an intake specialist if the shelter worked with trans or HIV positive groups. The specialist asked Bonifacio directly if he was trans or HIV positive, to which Bonifacio replied he was trans. After being assured this would be kept in confidence, within minutes, Bonifacio was transferred to another shelter and told that his trans identity was a liability to Acacia. 


“Unfortunately, Mr. Bonifacio’s experience is not unique and is common for TGNCI individuals in the homeless shelter system.” Hilal Khalil, Bonifacio’s Staff Attorney at AVP said. “At the New York City Anti-Violence Project, we hear many cases of TGNCI harassment and discrimination within the shelter system. However, unlike Mr. Bonifacio, many TGNCI survivors of violence do not have the financial means nor the emotional stamina to undertake the burden of challenging city institutions for the harm that they caused. This settlement marks great strides in improving the safety and well-being of TGNCI individuals who enter the shelter system.”

In total, Bonifacio was transferred between seven different shelters. The discriminatory transfers on the basis of his trans identity had a negative impact on his mental health and general well-being. Still he persevered with his complaint, not only for himself but also for other TGNCI people in the homeless shelter system.

“This case took me four years and it was a long struggle. Many trans folks don’t live to be as old as I am now. That is the reality. I hope that some of these policy changes will protect people of trans experience and also all minorities in the shelter system from harm,” Bonifacio said. “The fight is not yet over, there is still a lot of work to be done.”

Bonifacio became a fierce advocate for his community and is pledging to continue to hold DHS accountable, first by working to make sure all portions of his settlement are implemented including:

  • A TGNCI Policy that is being adopted and implemented by DHS and provided to all new employees for a minimum of five years. The TGNCI policy can be found here.
  • The implementation of a training on the TGNCI policy to all DHS staff.
  • An update to the Peace officer Guide which will now also require POs to address the public using pronouns in accordance to their gender identity.
  • The DHS provider Acacia shall designate a staff LGBTQI Housing Specialist, a position that will exist for a minimum of three years.
  • For two years after this agreement, Acacia will establish record-keeping protocols on all gender-based discrimination and harassment and report it twice a year to City Commission on Human Rights.

Read more here at NewNowNext.


If you are in need of legal services, call our 24 hour hotline at 212-714-1184. During business hours, you will speak directly with a Counselor/Advocate who will conduct a brief intake and forward your information and legal concerns to the Legal Services Department who will then schedule an in-person comprehensive legal intake. Legal appointments are usually made within one week, and faster in emergency cases.

NCAVP mourns the death of 24-year-old Pebbles LaDime Doe, a Black transgender woman in Allendale, SC

NCAVP mourns the death of 24-year-old Pebbles LaDime Doe, a Black transgender woman in Allendale, SC whose life was tragically taken on Sunday, August 4, 2019. While Pebbles’ untimely death is under investigation, details remain unclear. In initial reports, local media and police deadnamed and misgendered Pebbles, a practice that furthers harm and discrimination against transgender people. Her family says, “ always been a friendly person to everyone. The joy of anyone’s life.”

The Alliance for Full Acceptance issued a statement at the news of Doe’s death.

“While our community is still reeling from the murder of one of our transgender sisters in North Charleston just two weeks ago, we now learn that a second black trans woman has been murdered not even one hundred miles away.  We are sounding the alarm— We are in an absolute state of emergency for black transgender women.

“ We are at a crisis point that demands the nation’s attention,” the Alliance for Full Acceptance continued. “At this moment, there is no sense of peace or security for our transgender community— and there won’t be until their lives are truly respected and valued by society.”

We know it can be hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP memberIf you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilngual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the death of 21-year-old Kiki Fantroy, a Black transgender woman in Miami, FL

NCAVP mourns the death of 21-year-old Kiki Fantroy, a Black transgender woman in Miami, FL whose life was tragically taken on Wednesday, July 31, 2019. In initial reports, local media and police deadnamed and misgendered Kiki. Her mother says the 21-year-old was returning from a party with friends when they were approached by a group of men who propositioned them for sex. After refusing their advances, Kiki was fatally shot a few minutes away from her home.

Police are currently seeking suspects.

We know it can be hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP memberIf you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilingual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the death of 29-year-old Denali Berries Stuckey, a Black transgender woman in Charleston, SC

NCAVP mourns the death of 29-year-old Denali Berries Stuckey, a Black transgender woman in North Charleston, South Carolina, whose life was tragically lost to gun violence on Sunday, July 21, 2019. Denali is currently the 12th known transgender woman to die by way of violence this year, all of which were Black American.

In initial reports, the North Charleston Deputy Coroner, Kimberly Rhoton, and local media deadnamed and misgendered Denali. While the initial report has since been corrected, the practice of deadnaming and misgendering trans and gender non-conforming people contributes to the physical and fatal violence waged against the TGNC community, as well as the underreporting of hate violence homicides.

Denali’s cousin Ron’Rico Judon, the Vice President of Charleston Black Pride, told BuzzFeed News, “She always wanted to change the world through her work and advocacy by being a role model to other LGBT-identified people in the community,” Judon, who is also the vice president of Charleston Black Pride, said. “She just wanted to make sure she was a positive role model.”

The North Charleston Police Department is currently investigating Stuckey’s death as a homicide

We know it can be hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP memberIf you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilingual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

 

NCAVP mourns the death of 17-year-old Bianca Devins, an asexual white teen in Utica, NY

NCAVP mourns the death of 17-year-old Bianca Devins, an asexual teen in Utica, NY, whose life was tragically and publicly taken, July 14, 2019. According to media reports, Bianca Devins was a recent graduate of Thomas R. Proctor High School in Utica, New York who grew an online following through frequently posting photos on Instagram and Tumblr about video games, asexuality, and anime. Mourning friends say she was active in gaming and other online communities and served as an inspiration for creative expression.

The Devins’ family issued a statement through police thanking friends and family for their prayers, “Bianca’s smile brightened our lives. She will always be remembered as our princess.”

Devins’ sister wrote on Instagram, “Thank you for being the best sister I could ever imagine Thank you for always protecting me and sticking up for me. I am going to do this for you.”

The 21 year old suspect, Brandon Clark, has been identified and is slated to face charges in the forthcoming days.

We know it can be hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP memberIf you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilingual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

 

NCAVP mourns the death of Melvin “Lee” Mecker, a 58-year-old white cisgender gay man in Kansas City, MO

NCAVP mourns the death of Melvin “Lee” Mecker, a 58-year old-white cisgender gay man in Kansas City, MO, who passed on April 10, 2019 due to an explosive fire in his home.  Mecker was the owner of Buddies, a beloved local bar in Kansas City. Mourning friends commented, “If you needed a hand out and he could do it, he would do it for you. He was a really great guy,” and “Lee is the type of person who didn’t turn his back on folks. He sees the good in everybody and he tried. ”

According to local media, Mecker reported experiences of intimate partner violence to the police on more than one occasion. After months of investigation, police ruled Mecker’s death a homicide, with no current suspects.

We know it can be hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP memberIf you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilingual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.