NCAVP mourns the homicide of Candace Towns in Macon, GA

NCAVP mourns the death of Candace Towns, a Black transgender woman killed in Macon, GA, on October 31, 2017. Candace Towns is at least the 26th transgender and gender-nonconforming person killed in 2017. According to media reports, Towns was found fatally shot after being reported missing earlier that weekend. Police are investigating her death as a homicide, though the investigation is still in its early stages. Media reports initially misgendered and dead-named Towns.

We mourn the loss of Candace Towns, and send love and care to her friends and loved ones. “If I needed anything she would give it to me. She would give me the clothes off her back,” said Malaysa Monroe, remembering Candace’s kindness and generosity.

In memory of Candace Towns.

We know it can be hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP member. Read the full list here.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the homicide of Elizabeth Stephanie Montez in Corpus Christi, TX

NCAVP mourns the death of Elizabeth Stephanie Montez, a transgender Latinx woman, killed in Corpus Christi, Texas, on October 21, 2017. According to media reports, 47-year-old Montez, who is at least the 25th transgender and gender-nonconforming person killed in 2017, had been fatally shot multiple times, and police are investigating her death as a homicide, though the investigation is still in its early stages. Media reports initially misgendered and dead-named Montez.

We mourn the loss of Elizabeth Stephanie Montez, who was a beloved performer, dancer, and friend. She is remembered in a loving obituary as “One of the most beautiful, kind, gentle, and loving human beings we have ever known. She was never afraid or ashamed to be true to herself or anyone else. She was the sweetest most kind, most courageous, most selfless person that would give the shirt off her back to anyone in need and most often did.” We must work to ensure that our LGBT elders, especially transgender and gender non-conforming elders, are uplifted and supported at all points in their lives.

Local organization, PFLAG Corpus Christi, is organizing a transgender rights rally on Saturday, November 4. Said PFLAG Corpus Christi President Kathy Huff: “We are calling for not only an end to the violence against trans women, but also for gender identity to be added to the hate crime laws in Texas, as well as within anti-discrimination laws along with sexual orientation.” The rally calls for justice for the transgender community, for action on a local level, and for equality.

In memory of Elizabeth Stephanie Montez.

For more information about the upcoming rally and PFLAG Corpus Christi, visit https://www.facebook.com/pflagcct.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the homicide of Jaylow Mcglory in Alexandria, LA

NCAVP mourns the death of Jaylow Mcglory, a Black transgender woman, who was killed on August 4, 2017. According to media reports, 29-year-old Jaylow had been fatally shot multiple times, and police are investigating her death as a homicide. A suspect, 20-year-old Desmond Harris, has been charged with second-degree murder. Early media reports initially misgendered Jaylow, and little information is available about the circumstances of her death.

We mourn the loss of Jaylow Mcglory, and send love and care to her friends and loved ones. “All of us need to be working to keep transgender people safe in our communities, and to support our trans friends and family members as they grieve and heal,” said LaLa Zannell, Lead Organizer at the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

In memory of Jaylow Mcglory.

If you are in the Louisiana area, NCAVP member organization BreakOUT! is available as a resource to you. Call (504) 522-5435 or visit www.youthbreakout.org for more information.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the police violence homicide of Scout Schultz in Atlanta, GA

NCAVP mourns the death of Scout Schultz, who was shot and killed on September 16th, 2017 by Georgia Tech Campus Police in Atlanta, Georgia. According to press reports, Schultz was in emotional distress when they walked toward police carrying a knife before they were shot. It has been reported that Schultz identified as nonbinary, bisexual, and intersex, used they/them pronouns, and was the president of Georgia Tech’s Pride Alliance. Protests were held on the Georgia Tech campus following Schultz’s death.

We mourn the loss of Scout Schultz, and send love and care to their friends and loved ones. Schultz’s family spoke out, sharing that they had a history of emotional and mental health issues and had attempted to self-harm in the past. Georgia Tech Campus Police responded with deadly force, which Schultz’s family has said they do not believe was necessary and plan to bring a civil rights lawsuit.

Each year, NCAVP records homicides where police use excessive force against our communities, especially transgender and gender non-conforming people and LGBTQ people of color. We join so many in our communities demanding justice and accountability for Scout Schultz’s homicide at the hands of the police, and calling for increased competency by police in responding to individuals who are manifesting signs and symptoms of mental illness.

In memory of Scout Schultz.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the intimate partner violence homicide of Kashmire Redd in Gates, NY

NCAVP mourns the death of Kashmire Redd, a black transgender man who was fatally stabbed by his partner, Doris E. Carrasquillo, on September 4. Redd, who was 28 years old, was shot by 40-year-old Carrasquillo after a domestic dispute. Though little is known about the circumstances of the killing, media reports indicate that police had previously been called to the apartment that the two shared. Carrasquillo has been charged with second-degree murder for Redd’s death.

We mourn the loss of Kashmire Redd, who is the 13th LGTBQ victim of fatal intimate partner violence NCAVP has counted this year, and send love and care to his friends and loved ones. Though not often talked about, intimate partner violence (IPV) affects lesbian, bisexual, and gay people at the same or higher rates than non-LGB people. Transgender people in particular experience IPV at higher rates – about 30 to 50%, compared to 28 to 33% of the general population. However, LGBTQ people continue to experience discrimination and violence when accessing care and support around relationship violence.

Working together to support each other as a community, and helping support those who might be in abusive relationships, is crucial to helping prevent intimate partner violence before it escalates. In doing so, we must also work to enrich our narratives and models of what healthy, loving LGBTQ relationships look like, and support each other in understanding and learning that we are all deserving of love, as a community and as individuals.

In memory of Kashmire Redd.

 

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the hate violence homicide of TeeTee Dangerfield in College Park, GA

NCAVP mourns the death of TeeTee Dangerfield, a Black transgender woman, who was fatally shot while parked in her vehicle on the morning of July 31, according to media reports. No suspect and no motive have been reported in her homicide, though College Park police are pursuing leads.

We mourn the loss of TeeTee Dangerfield, who was described by her cousin as “just an all-around beautiful person” and “an amazing soul,” and who is the 16th transgender woman of color and the 13th Black transgender woman we have lost to fatal violence this year. We see again and again that black transgender women are disproportionately and overwhelmingly affected by hate violence, and that this violence is all too often fatal. This cannot go on. We call upon our communities of many identities- LGBTQ, Black, of color- to embrace our transgender sisters and support each other through economic empowerment and narratives of strength and love.

We send love and care to the friends and loved ones of TeeTee Dangerfield. To support TeeTee’s family with burial and funeral costs, please visit their fundraiser here.

In memory of TeeTee Dangerfield.

AVP has learned of an anti-transgender attack on Staten Island

AVP has learned of an anti-transgender attack which occurred in Stapleton on Staten Island on Wednesday, August 2nd, 2017. According to media reports, two men attacked a 29-year-old transgender woman at the intersection of Prospect and Bay Streets. The men were apprehended hours later and charged in connection with the attack.

AVP has reached out to the office of City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito, the office of New York City Councilmember Deborah Rose, the office of Public Advocate Letitia James, the New York City Commission on Human Rights, the Mayor’s Community Affairs Office, the NYPD Hate Crimes Task Force, and the NYPD Community Affairs Bureau.

TAKE ACTION WITH AVP

We all have a role in ending violence. One way to take action right now is to take our Bystander Intervention Pledge, #IWillNotStandBy, to commit to look out for one another, to report anti-LGBTQ violence and discrimination where we witness it, and to intervene in ways that are safe for ourselves and those around us.

If you witness hate violence you can:

  • Assess the situation to see how you can best take action. Only proceed if it is safe to do so in all of these instances.
  • Make your presence known by asking questions and talking to both the victim and the perpetrator.
  • Speak up, be LOUD, and call out what’s happening: identifying violence by name can help deter it.
  • Distract and divert the attacker’s attention by making a scene, and being noisy to draw the attention of others.
  • Record what’s happening by taking video on your phone.
  • Ask what support the survivor needs and provide it if you can.
  • Report the incident to AVP on our 24/7 hotline at 212-714-1141 or our Online Reporting Form. The hotline can also be a resource for the survivor if they so choose.

AVP will be doing outreach on Staten Island in the weeks ahead to hand out safety information and resources.  Additionally, to work on issues of violence in an ongoing way, join AVP’s Hate Violence Community Action Committee, a community and survivor-led working group that addresses hate violence, police violence, hook-up violence, and discrimination against LGBTQ and HIV-affected communities, which meets monthly at AVP. To join us for outreach or to get involved with our Hate Violence Community Action Committee contact LaLa Zannell at lzannell@avp.org.

REPORTING VIOLENCE HELPS END VIOLENCE

AVP encourages you to report violence you experience or witness to our free and confidential 24-hour bilingual (English/Spanish) hotline at 212-714-1141 where you can speak with a trained counselor and seek support, or you can report violence anonymously online, or to ask for a counselor to reach out to you.

 

AVP Action Brief: Transgender people are not a “burden” or a “distraction”

The AVP Action Brief tracks actions of the Trump administration that impact our communities’ safety and rights and offers concrete steps that we can take to stand up for safety and justice.

We are here for you and we are in this together.

The federal government is taking actions this week to make the country less safe and more hostile for LGBTQ people with two serious threats: to bar transgender people from military service, and to exclude LGBTQ people from civil rights protections in the workplace. Find out more and take action below.

Transgender people are not a “burden” or a “distraction”

This morning, President Trump announced on Twitter that he intends to ban transgender people from serving in the military. The president cited “tremendous medical costs” and “disruption” of having transgender people serve in the military to justify this action. Transgender people are not a “burden” or a “disruption,” and this kind of language coming from the president puts the safety of our communities at risk. Further, transgender people deserve access to health care and employment, both of which are being undermined by this new Trump pronouncement and time and again by the policies of this administration. While we don’t know exactly how Trump’s tweets will play out in terms of policy, we do know that they create a nation that is more hostile and more discriminatory towards transgender and gender non-conforming people, and this is unacceptable. AVP has signed on in support of tonight’s NYC Rally Against Trump Decision to Ban Trans Military Service. Come out – 5pm in Times Square – and let your voice be heard!

Sessions continues to try to roll back LGBTQ protections in the workplace

This week, it appears Attorney General Jeff Sessions will try to limit the protections for LGBTQ people have against discrimination in the workplace. Sources close to Session state that the Justice Department plans to file a brief in an employment discrimination case before the U.S. Second Circuit Court of Appeals claiming that LGBT workers are not protected by Title VII, a civil rights law that bars discrimination in employment. This action would try to reverse recent interpretations of Title VII by former Attorney general Eric Holder, The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, and numerous courts.

In NCAVP’s most recent report, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and HIV-Affected Hate Violence in 2016, more than 1 in 6 LGBTQ people who reported experiencing violence to NCAVP said that they had experienced violence in the workplace. With such a large percentage of hate violence against LGBTQ people occurring in the workplace, this attempt to roll back protections puts our community at greater risk for bias, harassment, discrimination, and violence.

Here’s what you can do.

  • Tweet at Trump and your representatives using the #ProtectTransTroops and let them know that you do not support reinstating the ban on transgender people serving in the military.
  • Use #ValueTransLives in your calls to action to honor and uplift the transgender and gender non-conforming people in our communities, workplaces, and families.
  • Read our latest report to get the full picture of hate violence and learn more.
  • Report violence you experience or witness to AVP and Communities Against Hate.
  • If you know someone who is an LGBTQ survivor of violence who is experiencing trauma or fear as a result of these recent actions, encourage them to contact AVP’s confidential 24-hour English/Spanish hotline at (212) 714-1141. They will be connected with a counselor who understands the ways this political climate is affecting our communities.
  • Get involved—volunteer with AVP!
  • Support AVP: Give now to ensure our voices are heard.
  • Forward this email to a friend. Ask them to sign up for the AVP Action Brief to stay informed and activated, too. 

NCAVP mourns the homicide of Ebony Morgan, a Black transgender woman killed in Lynchburg, VA; the 15th reported killing of a transgender person of color NCAVP has responded to in 2017

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) mourns the homicide of Ebony Morgan, a black transgender woman, killed in Lynchburg, Virginia on July 2nd, 2017. According to the Virginia Anti-Violence Project (VAVP), she was shot and died early Sunday morning at Lynchburg General Hospital. Local media originally misnamed and misgendered Ebony.

“While there is still an active investigation happening into the shooting of Ebony Morgan, perceived and actual gender identity and race often play a role in escalating violence against LGBTQ+-identified individuals.,” said Stacie Vecchietti, Director of VAVP. “VAVP hopes that throughout the investigative process, the media, police, and the public at-large, will respect Ebony’s identity and maintain a level of decorum and understanding when interacting with her family and other individuals who identify within transgender and non-conforming communities. VAVP will continue to stand in solidarity with the family and community of Ebony and other LGBTQ+ individuals that have been impacted by violence.”

If you are in the Virginia area, VAVP offers services for survivors of intimate partner abuse, sexual assault, and stalking, as well as hate/bias motivated harassment and violence. VAVP also has resources to support training and consultation with agencies, community groups, congregations, and other interested organizations. For more information on the Virginia Anti-Violence Project, visit virginiaavp.org, email director@virginiaavp.org, or call (804) 925-9242.

If you are LGBTQ+-identified and you have been impacted by violence, you can contact the Virginia LGBTQ Partner Abuse and Sexual Assault Helpline via text at (804) 793-9999 or by phone at 1-866-356-6998.

NCAVP’s most recent hate violence report, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and HIV-Affected Hate Violence in 2016, recorded 77 total hate violence related homicides of LGBTQ and HIV-affected people in 2016, including the 49 mostly LGBTQ and Latinx lives lost in the shooting at the Pulse Nightclub in Orlando, Florida in June of 2016. Outside of those lives lost during the shooting at Pulse Nightclub, there were 28 homicides of LGBTQ people, an increase of 17% from 24 in 2015. Of the 28 reported non-Pulse hate violence homicides, 79% were people of color, 19 were transgender and gender non-conforming people, and 17 were transgender women of color.

NCAVP is a resource for anyone who experiences violence.  For more information, or to locate an anti-violence program in your area, please contact us at info@ncavp.org or visit us online.  Join NCAVP in our efforts to prevent and respond to LGBTQ and HIV-affected violence.  To learn more about our national advocacy and receive technical assistance or support, contact us at info@ncavp.org.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities.  NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change.  NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

 

NCAVP mourns the homicide of Ava Le’Ray Barrin, a black transgender teenage girl killed in Athens, GA

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) mourns the homicide of Ava Le’Ray Barrin, a black transgender teenage girl, killed in Athens, Georgia on June 25th, 2017. According to media reports, Ava was fatally shot after an argument with Jalen Brown, an acquaintance. Brown has been charged with her murder and aggravated assault. Ava, who was seventeen years old, is the youngest transgender person killed this year. Friends and family came from as far as Chicago to mourn and remember her life at a vigil in Athens on Monday.

“We send care and support to everyone who knew Ava and has been impacted by this tragic loss,” said LaLa Zannell, Lead Organizer at the New York City Anti-Violence Project. “In mourning Ava’s death, we must take the time now to make space to talk about the root causes of interpersonal, community violence. Though we know to call out hate violence, we need to deepen our analysis of the systemic violence that affects our communities and how it manifests in interpersonal violence, which deeply affects all of us—not just the people at the center of an incident.”

NCAVP’s most recent hate violence report, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and HIV-Affected Hate Violence in 2016, recorded 77 total hate violence related homicides of LGBTQ and HIV-affected people in 2016, including the 49 mostly LGBTQ and Latinx lives lost in the shooting at the Pulse Nightclub in Orlando, Florida in June of 2016. Outside of those lives lost during the shooting at Pulse Nightclub, there were 28 homicides of LGBTQ people, an increase of 17% from 24 in 2015. Of the 28 reported non-Pulse hate violence homicides, 79% were people of color, 19 were transgender and gender non-conforming people, and 17 were transgender women of color.

NCAVP’s most recent intimate partner violence report, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, and HIV-Affected Intimate Partner Violence in 2015, recorded 13 intimate partner violence-related homicides in 2015. Of those homicides, six were transgender women of color.

NCAVP is a resource for anyone who experiences violence.  For more information, or to locate an anti-violence program in your area, please contact us at info@ncavp.org or visit us online.  Join NCAVP in our efforts to prevent and respond to LGBTQ and HIV-affected violence.  To learn more about our national advocacy and receive technical assistance or support, contact us at info@ncavp.org.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities.  NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change.  NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.