NCAVP mourns the death of Sasha Wall in Chesterfield County, SC

NCAVP mourns the death of Sasha Wall, a black transgender woman of 29 years, in Chesterfield County, SC. According to reports, a passing motorist found Wall in her vehicle on the side of the road. Unfortunately, it was too late as she succumbed to her injuries from being shot several times.

Media outlets initially misgendered and deadnamed; we have reached out to request an update to accurately reflect her gender identity. Investigators say she may have known the shooter who is still at large at this time.

Misgendering and/or deadnaming can attribute to the misreporting, or lack of reporting, of deaths of transgender people and hate violence related incidents.

The loss of Sasha Wall marks the 8th reported death of a transgender person and 5th transgender person of color in 2018.

We send our love to her family and loved ones.

We know it can be hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP member. If you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilingual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the intimate partner violence homicide of Ariel Gonzalez in Broward County, FL

NCAVP mourns the death of Ariel Gonzalez, who was found dead in his apartment on September 13, 2017, following Hurricane Irma. According to media reports, 50-year-old Gonzalez was brutally murdered on September 10th, by Travis Watson and Jacob Mitchell, after Gonzalez had invited the couple into his home to hook up. Though little is known about the motive of the killing, robbery and jealousy were two factors, according to media reports. Watson is currently in custody, and police are searching for Mitchell.

We mourn the loss of Ariel Gonzalez, and send love and care to his friends and loved ones. Though not often discussed, gay and bisexual men experience intimate partner violence at similar if not higher rates as men who identify as heterosexual. As a community, and as a society, we must talk about LGBTQ IPV before it escalates, and raise up the experiences of queer, gay, bisexual and transgender men who are often left out of the conversations about this violence. We must also talk about hook-up violence, a form of violence that we need to address in our LGBTQ communities. So far in 2017 we have seen an increase in pick-up homicides, and we need awareness raising about this form of violence, affirming messages around sex, sexuality and safety, and safe spaces for our communities to meet and hook up.

In memory of Ariel Gonzalez.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the death of Ally Lee Steinfeld, in Texas County, MO

NCAVP mourns the death of Ally Lee Steinfeld, a transgender teenage girl killed in Texas County, Missouri, on September 5 2017. According to media reports, Ally, who was 17 years old, was brutally assaulted and killed by four suspects, aged 18, 18, 24, and 25, who are all now in custody. Though details of the incident are still emerging, reports indicate that Ally had been in a relationship with one of the suspects, 24-year-old Briana Calderas.

We mourn the loss of Ally Lee Steinfeld, who had just come out as transgender earlier this year and was beginning to live her truth and fully express herself. That she died in such a brutal way is utterly tragic. We must work to create and protect safe, supportive, and affirming environments for transgender and gender non-conforming youth at all points in their lives and gender expression, and through mentorship and leadership, offer trans youth the support and love they need to live their truths. At the same time, we must also remember to support the cis partners of TGNC folks and work to prevent this kind of dating violence, especially among youth. Loving someone shouldn’t ever be stigmatized. We all deserve and are capable of healthy, supportive relationships, no matter who we are.

“We are here to support Ally’s family and will continue to lift Ally’s name in love and light,” said Melissa Brown, of the Kansas City Anti-Violence Project.

In memory of Ally Lee Steinfeld.

 

If you are in the Missouri area, NCAVP member organization the Kansas City Anti-Violence Project is available as a resource to you. Call (816) 561-0550 or visit kcavp.org for more information.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the intimate partner violence homicide of Kashmire Redd in Gates, NY

NCAVP mourns the death of Kashmire Redd, a black transgender man who was fatally stabbed by his partner, Doris E. Carrasquillo, on September 4. Redd, who was 28 years old, was shot by 40-year-old Carrasquillo after a domestic dispute. Though little is known about the circumstances of the killing, media reports indicate that police had previously been called to the apartment that the two shared. Carrasquillo has been charged with second-degree murder for Redd’s death.

We mourn the loss of Kashmire Redd, who is the 13th LGTBQ victim of fatal intimate partner violence NCAVP has counted this year, and send love and care to his friends and loved ones. Though not often talked about, intimate partner violence (IPV) affects lesbian, bisexual, and gay people at the same or higher rates than non-LGB people. Transgender people in particular experience IPV at higher rates – about 30 to 50%, compared to 28 to 33% of the general population. However, LGBTQ people continue to experience discrimination and violence when accessing care and support around relationship violence.

Working together to support each other as a community, and helping support those who might be in abusive relationships, is crucial to helping prevent intimate partner violence before it escalates. In doing so, we must also work to enrich our narratives and models of what healthy, loving LGBTQ relationships look like, and support each other in understanding and learning that we are all deserving of love, as a community and as individuals.

In memory of Kashmire Redd.

 

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the intimate partner violence homicide of Trenton Cornell-Duranleau in Chicago, IL

Trenton Cornell-Duranleau, age 26, was stabbed to death on July 27th 2017 by his boyfriend, Wyndham Lathem, and another man, Andrew Warren in Lathem’s apartment. According to media reports, Cornell-Duranleau and Lathem may have had a falling out. Lathem and Warren were also allegedly part of an online chat site where they had been planning a murder-suicide scenario for months. After killing Cornell-Duranleau, Lathem and Warren fled, but were eventually apprehended and charged.

We mourn the loss of Trenton Cornell-Duranleau, and send love and care to his friends and loved ones. Though not often discussed, gay and bisexual men experience intimate partner violence at similar if not higher rates as men who identify as heterosexual. As a community, and as a society, we must talk about LGBTQ IPV before it escalates, and raise up the experiences of queer, gay, bisexual and transgender men who are often left out of the conversations about this violence.

IPV affects our whole community. If you think someone is in an unhealthy relationship, reach out to them. We need to look out for and support each other.

In memory of Trenton Cornell-Duranleau.

If you are in the Chicago area, NCAVP member program Center on Halsted is available to support you. Call (773) 472-6469 or visit www.centeronhalsted.org for more information. NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the intimate partner violence homicide of Carzella Little in Huntsville, AL

NCAVP mourns the death of Carzella Little, who was fatally shot by her girlfriend, Datondra Mitchell, on August 26, according to media reports. Little, who was 20 years old, was shot by 25-year-old Mitchell after an argument. Mitchell, who has been previously charged with domestic violence, was charged with Carzella’s murder and is being held in custody.

We mourn the loss of Carzella Little, who is the 12th LGTBQ victim of fatal intimate partner violence NCAVP has counted this year, and send love and care to her friends and loved ones. Though not often talked about, intimate partner violence (IPV) affects lesbian, bisexual, and gay people at the same or higher rates than non-LGB people. And yet, LGBTQ people continue to experience discrimination and violence when accessing care and support around relationship violence.

Working together to support each other as a community, and helping support those who might be in abusive relationships, is crucial to helping prevent intimate partner violence before it escalates. In doing so, we must also work to enrich our narratives and models of what healthy, loving LGBTQ relationships look like, and support each other in understanding and learning that we are all deserving of love, as a community and as individuals.

In memory of Carzella Little.

NCAVP mourns the intimate partner violence related homicide of Mike Collins in Birmingham, AL

NCAVP mourns the death of Mike Collins, who was found dead in his apartment on August 21st, 2017. According to media reports, he had been killed by D’kota Chance Griffin, with whom he had had a prior romantic relationship. Though much isn’t known about the motive of the attack, police say that it occurred after a physical altercation between the two men. Griffin has been charged with Collins’s murder and taken into custody. Collins was remembered by hundreds in a candlelit vigil held on the 22nd, the day after his body was found.

We mourn the loss of Mike Collins, who is the 10th LGTBQ victim of fatal intimate partner violence NCAVP has counted this year, and send love and care to his friends and loved ones, especially the Odenville Middle School community, which counted him as family. Though not often talked about, intimate partner violence (IPV) affects lesbian, bisexual, and gay people at the same or higher rates than non-LGB people. And yet, LGBTQ people continue to experience discrimination and violence when accessing care and support around relationship violence.

The overlap of hate violence and intimate partner violence is often very large, and that hate violence may be internalized or externalized and enacted in different ways. We must work together to support each other as a community, and help support those who might be in abusive relationships, and we must also work to enrich our narratives and models of what healthy, loving LGBTQ relationships look like: not only in terms of love for community and individuals but in terms of self-love, as well.

In memory of Mike Collins.

If you are in the Birmingham, AL area, NCAVP member organization The Free2Be Safe Anti-Violence Project is available to support you. Get in touch at (205) 202-7476 or find out more at http://free2be.org/free2be-safe.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the intimate partner violence homicide of Felicia Dormans in Mount Holly, NJ.

NCAVP mourns the death of Felicia Dormans, who was fatally shot by her wife, Laura Bluestein, on August 6, according to media reports. As of now, little is known about the motive of the shooting. Bluestein has been charged with Felicia’s murder and was taken into custody.

We mourn the loss of Felicia Dormans, who is the 9th LGTBQ victim of fatal intimate partner violence NCAVP has counted this year, and send love and care to her friends and loved ones. Though not often talked about, intimate partner violence (IPV) affects lesbian, bisexual, and gay people at the same or higher rates than non-LGB people. And yet, LGBTQ people continue to experience discrimination and violence when accessing care and support around relationship violence.

Working together to support each other as a community, and helping support those who might be in abusive relationships, is crucial to helping prevent intimate partner violence before it escalates. And in doing so, we must also work to enrich our narratives and models of what healthy, loving LGBTQ relationships look like, and support each other in understanding and learning that we are all deserving of love, as a community and as individuals.

In memory of Felicia Dormans.

NCAVP mourns the intimate partner violence homicide of Gerald Moore in Madison, Wisconsin

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) has learned of the intimate partner violence related homicide of Gerald Moore, which occurred on June 24, 2017. According to local media reports, Gerald died after being stabbed multiple times by Ronald Redeaux. The two were in a relationship, and according to police, officers had responded to domestic disturbances at their home in the past; Redeaux had been arrested for domestic battery.

“We are deeply saddened by the homicide of Gerald Moore,” said Kathy Flores, LGBTQ Anti-Violence Statewide Program Coordinator at Diverse and Resilient. “While we don’t know all the details of this case just yet, we’ve learned Gerald was a victim of intimate partner violence within his relationship before and it is believed this is how he lost his life. There continues to be many barriers for gay victims of violence, particularly gay men of color. A lack of understanding about intimate partner violence in LGBTQ relationships, both within the LGBTQ community and the community at large, continues to exist further causing more isolation of victims when they are unsure of what systems are designed to help them. Unfortunately, when there is a past history of violence in a relationship, it will often escalate. Gay male victims often feel shame about reaching out for help due to damaging messages in our community about what it means to be a male survivor. It is our sincere hope that not one more life is lost to intimate partner violence.”

If you or someone you know is a victim of intimate partner violence in the Wisconsin area, please reach out to the Room to Be Safe LGBTQ Anti-Violence line at 414-856-LGBT (5428). An LGBTQ advocate is available to help with safety planning, support and to help you connect to services within our communities. You can also visit roomtobesafe.org for more information.

“We send love and care to Gerald’s friends and loved ones,” said Essex Lordes, NCAVP Coordinator at the New York City Anti Violence Project. “As a society, the issue of LGBTQ intimate partner violence is often ignored, and if we continue to ignore it, we will have many more tragedies such as this one that could be prevented by more public awareness and less stigmatization. Intimate partner violence is a pervasive part of our community, and it’s our collective responsibility to support and care for each other throughout experiences of intimate partner violence, because we cannot rely solely on police to address it only when it has reached a dangerous level. Bystanders, friends, and family have the capacity to—and must be supported in—intervening around intimate partner violence before it escalates.”

NCAVP’s report Intimate Partner Violence in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, and HIV Affected Communities in 2015, released in October 2016, documented 13 IPV homicides in 2015. Of the thirteen homicides, four of the victims were cisgender men, all of whom were killed by current or former male partners. Additionally, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, lesbians, gay men and bisexual people experience intimate partner violence at the same or higher rates as non-LGB people.

NCAVP is a resource for anyone who experiences violence.  For more information, or to locate an anti-violence program in your area, please contact us at info@ncavp.org or visit us online.  Join NCAVP in our efforts to prevent and respond to LGBTQ and HIV-affected violence.  To learn more about our national advocacy and receive technical assistance or support, contact us at info@ncavp.org.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities.  NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change.  NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the homicide of Ava Le’Ray Barrin, a black transgender teenage girl killed in Athens, GA

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) mourns the homicide of Ava Le’Ray Barrin, a black transgender teenage girl, killed in Athens, Georgia on June 25th, 2017. According to media reports, Ava was fatally shot after an argument with Jalen Brown, an acquaintance. Brown has been charged with her murder and aggravated assault. Ava, who was seventeen years old, is the youngest transgender person killed this year. Friends and family came from as far as Chicago to mourn and remember her life at a vigil in Athens on Monday.

“We send care and support to everyone who knew Ava and has been impacted by this tragic loss,” said LaLa Zannell, Lead Organizer at the New York City Anti-Violence Project. “In mourning Ava’s death, we must take the time now to make space to talk about the root causes of interpersonal, community violence. Though we know to call out hate violence, we need to deepen our analysis of the systemic violence that affects our communities and how it manifests in interpersonal violence, which deeply affects all of us—not just the people at the center of an incident.”

NCAVP’s most recent hate violence report, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and HIV-Affected Hate Violence in 2016, recorded 77 total hate violence related homicides of LGBTQ and HIV-affected people in 2016, including the 49 mostly LGBTQ and Latinx lives lost in the shooting at the Pulse Nightclub in Orlando, Florida in June of 2016. Outside of those lives lost during the shooting at Pulse Nightclub, there were 28 homicides of LGBTQ people, an increase of 17% from 24 in 2015. Of the 28 reported non-Pulse hate violence homicides, 79% were people of color, 19 were transgender and gender non-conforming people, and 17 were transgender women of color.

NCAVP’s most recent intimate partner violence report, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, and HIV-Affected Intimate Partner Violence in 2015, recorded 13 intimate partner violence-related homicides in 2015. Of those homicides, six were transgender women of color.

NCAVP is a resource for anyone who experiences violence.  For more information, or to locate an anti-violence program in your area, please contact us at info@ncavp.org or visit us online.  Join NCAVP in our efforts to prevent and respond to LGBTQ and HIV-affected violence.  To learn more about our national advocacy and receive technical assistance or support, contact us at info@ncavp.org.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities.  NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change.  NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.