NCAVP mourns the possible hate violence homicide of Derricka Banner in Charlotte, NC

NCAVP mourns the death of Derricka Banner, a Black transgender woman who was shot and killed in a vehicle early Tuesday morning, September 12th, 2017 in Charlotte, North Carolina.  According to a statement by Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police, Montavious Sanchez Berry, age 18, has been arrested and charged with murder, armed robbery and shooting into an occupied vehicle. So far in 2017, we have lost 21 transgender and gender non-conforming people to homicide, and of that number, 18 have been transgender women of color.

We mourn the loss of Derricka Banner, and send love and care to her friends and loved ones. “All of us need to be working to keep transgender people safe in our communities, and to support our trans friends and family members as they grieve and heal,” said LaLa Zannell, Lead Organizer at the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

Though we ask our allies and community members to pledge #IWillNotStandBy when witnessing violence on public transportation or on the street, we also know that it can be very dangerous to intervene, and that every incident of violence is different. Learn how to intervene safely, and be sure to assess the situation before intervening. Visit #IWillNotStandBy to learn tips on bystander intervention.

In memory of Derricka Banner.

 

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the possible hate violence homicide of Bubbles (Anthony Torres) in San Francisco, CA

NCAVP mourns the death of Anthony Torres, also known as Bubbles, who was fatally shot on the sidewalk in the Tenderloin neighborhood of San Francisco on September 10, 2017. According to media reports, little is known about the motive of the shooting, and police are not currently investigating it as a hate crime.

We mourn the loss of Anthony Torres, and send love and care to Bubbles’s friends and loved ones. Many have remembered Bubbles fondly as an activist, artist, performer, and a vibrant member of a diverse and passionate music community. “We know from patterns of violence against femme/female-presenting people, especially those queering up gender, that they are a target, as transgender women face violence at excruciatingly high rates,” said Pablo Espinoza-Schaudel, of NCAVP local member organization Community United Against Violence (CUAV).

“We want to reiterate to people that safety buddies are always a good idea, especially out on the streets and at parties,” said Espinoza-Schaudel. “Even when you are the entertainer/performer/DJ. Checking in with friends, asking for help getting home or company so you are not alone on the street. Having a fully-charged cell phone, letting friends or a roommate know when you are coming home.”

Though we ask our allies and community members to pledge #IWillNotStandBy when witnessing violence on public transportation or on the street, we also know that it can be very dangerous to intervene, and that every incident of violence is different. Never put your own safety at risk, and be sure to assess the situation before intervening. Visit #IWillNotStandBy to learn tips on bystander intervention.

In memory of Bubbles, also known as Anthony Torres.

 

If you are in the San Francisco area, CUAV is available as a resource to support you. Call (415) 333-HELP or visit www.cuav.org for more information.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the intimate partner violence homicide of Kashmire Redd in Gates, NY

NCAVP mourns the death of Kashmire Redd, a black transgender man who was fatally stabbed by his partner, Doris E. Carrasquillo, on September 4. Redd, who was 28 years old, was shot by 40-year-old Carrasquillo after a domestic dispute. Though little is known about the circumstances of the killing, media reports indicate that police had previously been called to the apartment that the two shared. Carrasquillo has been charged with second-degree murder for Redd’s death.

We mourn the loss of Kashmire Redd, who is the 13th LGTBQ victim of fatal intimate partner violence NCAVP has counted this year, and send love and care to his friends and loved ones. Though not often talked about, intimate partner violence (IPV) affects lesbian, bisexual, and gay people at the same or higher rates than non-LGB people. Transgender people in particular experience IPV at higher rates – about 30 to 50%, compared to 28 to 33% of the general population. However, LGBTQ people continue to experience discrimination and violence when accessing care and support around relationship violence.

Working together to support each other as a community, and helping support those who might be in abusive relationships, is crucial to helping prevent intimate partner violence before it escalates. In doing so, we must also work to enrich our narratives and models of what healthy, loving LGBTQ relationships look like, and support each other in understanding and learning that we are all deserving of love, as a community and as individuals.

In memory of Kashmire Redd.

 

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the intimate partner violence homicide of Trenton Cornell-Duranleau in Chicago, IL

Trenton Cornell-Duranleau, age 26, was stabbed to death on July 27th 2017 by his boyfriend, Wyndham Lathem, and another man, Andrew Warren in Lathem’s apartment. According to media reports, Cornell-Duranleau and Lathem may have had a falling out. Lathem and Warren were also allegedly part of an online chat site where they had been planning a murder-suicide scenario for months. After killing Cornell-Duranleau, Lathem and Warren fled, but were eventually apprehended and charged.

We mourn the loss of Trenton Cornell-Duranleau, and send love and care to his friends and loved ones. Though not often discussed, gay and bisexual men experience intimate partner violence at similar if not higher rates as men who identify as heterosexual. As a community, and as a society, we must talk about LGBTQ IPV before it escalates, and raise up the experiences of queer, gay, bisexual and transgender men who are often left out of the conversations about this violence.

IPV affects our whole community. If you think someone is in an unhealthy relationship, reach out to them. We need to look out for and support each other.

In memory of Trenton Cornell-Duranleau.

If you are in the Chicago area, NCAVP member program Center on Halsted is available to support you. Call (773) 472-6469 or visit www.centeronhalsted.org for more information. NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the intimate partner violence homicide of Carzella Little in Huntsville, AL

NCAVP mourns the death of Carzella Little, who was fatally shot by her girlfriend, Datondra Mitchell, on August 26, according to media reports. Little, who was 20 years old, was shot by 25-year-old Mitchell after an argument. Mitchell, who has been previously charged with domestic violence, was charged with Carzella’s murder and is being held in custody.

We mourn the loss of Carzella Little, who is the 12th LGTBQ victim of fatal intimate partner violence NCAVP has counted this year, and send love and care to her friends and loved ones. Though not often talked about, intimate partner violence (IPV) affects lesbian, bisexual, and gay people at the same or higher rates than non-LGB people. And yet, LGBTQ people continue to experience discrimination and violence when accessing care and support around relationship violence.

Working together to support each other as a community, and helping support those who might be in abusive relationships, is crucial to helping prevent intimate partner violence before it escalates. In doing so, we must also work to enrich our narratives and models of what healthy, loving LGBTQ relationships look like, and support each other in understanding and learning that we are all deserving of love, as a community and as individuals.

In memory of Carzella Little.

NCAVP mourns the intimate partner violence related homicide of Mike Collins in Birmingham, AL

NCAVP mourns the death of Mike Collins, who was found dead in his apartment on August 21st, 2017. According to media reports, he had been killed by D’kota Chance Griffin, with whom he had had a prior romantic relationship. Though much isn’t known about the motive of the attack, police say that it occurred after a physical altercation between the two men. Griffin has been charged with Collins’s murder and taken into custody. Collins was remembered by hundreds in a candlelit vigil held on the 22nd, the day after his body was found.

We mourn the loss of Mike Collins, who is the 10th LGTBQ victim of fatal intimate partner violence NCAVP has counted this year, and send love and care to his friends and loved ones, especially the Odenville Middle School community, which counted him as family. Though not often talked about, intimate partner violence (IPV) affects lesbian, bisexual, and gay people at the same or higher rates than non-LGB people. And yet, LGBTQ people continue to experience discrimination and violence when accessing care and support around relationship violence.

The overlap of hate violence and intimate partner violence is often very large, and that hate violence may be internalized or externalized and enacted in different ways. We must work together to support each other as a community, and help support those who might be in abusive relationships, and we must also work to enrich our narratives and models of what healthy, loving LGBTQ relationships look like: not only in terms of love for community and individuals but in terms of self-love, as well.

In memory of Mike Collins.

If you are in the Birmingham, AL area, NCAVP member organization The Free2Be Safe Anti-Violence Project is available to support you. Get in touch at (205) 202-7476 or find out more at http://free2be.org/free2be-safe.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the hate violence homicide of Kiwi Herring in St. Louis, MO

Kiwi Herring was killed in St. Louis, Missouri on August 22nd, 2017. According to media reports, Herring was experiencing escalating discrimination and harassment from neighbors. Police responding to the scene of the most recent disturbance shot and killed Herring, who may have cut or stabbed her neighbor. Some of Herring’s other neighbors held a candlelight vigil at the scene to protest this other recent fatal shootings by St. Louis police. Vigil attendees openly questioned whether police had targeted the correct aggressor in the dispute. At a second vigil and protest held in Kiwi’s honor, a driver named Mark Colao intentionally drove his car into the gathering.

The majority of survivors reporting hate violence to NCAVP member programs in 2016 experienced violence by someone they know, including landlords, neighbors, employers, and family members.  We must work to create safe spaces in our communities, residences, workplaces and schools so that LGBTQ people can survive and thrive.

We send love and light to Kiwi’s wife, family and friends, and acknowledge and appreciate the courage and commitment of her neighbors in holding vigils on her behalf.

In memory of Kiwi Herring.

If you are in the Missouri area, NCAVP has three member organizations that are here to support you. 

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the hate violence homicide of Gwynevere River Song in Waxahachie TX

NCAVP mourns the death of Gwynevere River Song, a transfeminine person who identified as femandrogyne and who used “they” pronouns, who was fatally shot in her home on August 12th. Little is known about the motive or perpetrator of their homicide at this time, though police have a suspect in custody.

We mourn the loss of Gwynevere River Song, who is the 17th transgender person we have lost to fatal violence this year. Gwynevere was remembered by many on an online tribute page, where friends from all over wrote of her kindness, creativity, and advocacy. “Your smile could light up a room and will forever be etched in my memory,” wrote one friend. Another friend wrote, “Gwyn was fiercely intelligent without ever being condescending, passionate and compassionate, and had a wicked sense of humor. Sending love to everyone who knew her well. I hope you can find comfort in how much she meant to so many people.” Gwynevere was remembered in a loving memorial, coordinated by Trans Pride Initiative and Gwyn’s mother.

We see again and again that transgender people, especially transfeminine folks, are disproportionately and overwhelmingly affected by hate violence, and that this violence is all too often fatal. This cannot go on. We call upon our communities of many identities to embrace our transgender members and support each other through economic empowerment and narratives of strength and love. We must work to provide empowering and affirming spaces for transgender and gender-nonconforming people, both in public spaces and in our workplaces, schools, and homes.

We send love and care to the friends and loved ones of Gwynevere River Song. Friends have suggested donations to Trans Lifeline in her memory.

In memory of Gwynevere River Song.

If you are in the Dallas, TX area, NCAVP member organization Trans Pride Initiative is available to support you. Get in touch at (214) 449-1439 or find out more at tpride.org.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the hate violence homicide of John Jolly in New York City, NY

NCAVP mourns the death of John Jolly, who was stabbed to death on the corner of 44th Street and Third Avenue in Manhattan on Wednesday, August 2nd, 2017.  According to media reports, Nathaniel Glover, also known as Kidd Creole, allegedly killed Jolly because he believed that Jolly was hitting on him. Glover has been arrested and charged in connection with his death.

We mourn the loss of John Jolly, who was killed because he was perceived to be gay, or perceived to be making unwanted sexual advances toward someone he didn’t know.

Though we ask our allies and community members to pledge #IWillNotStandBy when witnessing violence on public transportation or on the street, we also know that it can be very dangerous to intervene, and that every incident of violence is different. Never put your own safety at risk, and be sure to assess the situation before intervening. Visit #IWillNotStandBy to learn tips on bystander intervention.

In memory of John Jolly.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP condemns the violence of white supremacist groups and mourns the loss of Heather Heyer; calls white LGBTQ people to action

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs condemns the violence of white supremacist groups in Charlottesville, Virginia and mourns the loss of Heather Heyer, who was killed while taking a stand against vitriolic hate.

In this moment, our nation is witnessing the emboldening of white supremacist movements, which have always existed, but are being empowered, amplified, and enabled by the Trump Administration.  We call on everyone, but particularly white LGBTQ people, to call out and resist these vile movements and every hateful action the administration takes that deepens inequities and places marginalized groups at risk of further violence.

NCAVP is deeply familiar with the impact of hate violence. Each year, thousands of LGBTQ and HIV affected people reach out to NCAVP member programs after experiencing violence rooted in bias and hate. We continuously find that the majority of LGBTQ people reporting hate violence are people who hold multiple marginalized identities: LGBTQ people of color, LGBTQ people with disabilities, LGBTQ immigrants, and others. Sometimes the violence is physical, and sometimes it looks like day-to-day bias and harassment that LGBTQ people experience from co-workers, landlords, neighbors and classmates.

Since the election of President Trump, we have seen an increase in hotline calls and an increase in people reporting violence and seeking care and support. We have heard from countless people who have lived their entire lives fearful of experiencing violence based on their identities and experiences, only to have those feelings of fear heightened in recent months. The events in Charlottesville this weekend validated those fears, clearly demonstrating the escalating violence and terror that white supremacist groups are using under this administration in an attempt to maintain their power throughout the country.

Our systems and laws were intentionally created to give white people power and access to resources over people of color, and violence is often used as a tool to maintain that power. The events in Charlottesville did not occur in isolation, but rather were an extension of the violence that we witness every day that is deeply rooted in our society. NCAVP is committed to recognizing historical systems of oppression, such as anti-black racism, anti-Semitism, patriarchy, islamophobia, and xenophobia, in all of our anti-violence work and stand in solidarity with all movements to end white supremacy.

The events of the weekend have only served to further our commitment toward working for the liberation and self-determination of all people impacted by oppression and violence. We will continue to call out any legislators, Trump, and members of his administration who use hateful rhetoric to push forward their agenda and we will hold them accountable for any violence that ensues.  We will continue to fight against any roll backs of protections for LGBTQ people, people of color, immigrant communities and any marginalized group. And we will continue to resist and work to dismantle white supremacy following the leadership of those most marginalized.

NCAVP is a resource for anyone who experiences violence.  For more information, or to locate an anti-violence program in your area, please contact us at info@ncavp.org or visit us online.  Join NCAVP in our efforts to prevent and respond to LGBTQ and HIV-affected violence.  To learn more about our national advocacy and receive technical assistance or support, contact us at info@ncavp.org.