NCAVP mourns the intimate partner violence related homicide of Devon Wade in Houston, TX

NCAVP mourns the death of Devon Wade, who was fatally shot early in the morning of November 27, 2017. According to media reports, he was shot by Mario Jerrell Williams, who called himself his boyfriend, following a dispute at Devon’s home. Williams has been taken into custody. Devon, who was finishing his doctorate at Columbia, was honored during a vigil in New York City on the night of the 27th.

We mourn the loss of Devon Wade, who is the 16th LGTBQ victim of fatal intimate partner violence NCAVP has counted this year, and send love and care to his friends and loved ones. Devon, who was working to end carceral violence and disrupt the prison pipeline, was a beloved member of the Columbia University, Louisiana State University, and Kappa Alpha Psi communities. Many spoke out on social media to remember his life, and Devon was remembered in an article describing his work to help marginalized communities: “Wade worked fervently so that those without a “bright future”—individuals who often fall between the cracks of mass incarceration, poverty, racism, sexism, homophobia and transphobia—would not be forgotten. That memory should not be erased.”

Though not often talked about, intimate partner violence (IPV) affects LGBTQ people at the same or higher rates than non-LGBTQ people. And yet, LGBTQ people continue to experience discrimination and violence when accessing care and support around relationship violence.  This is particularly true for gay and bisexual men, and for transgender and gender non-conforming survivors, who fall outside the traditional understanding of IPV occurring in cisgender, heteronormative relationships.  We must work together to support each other as a community, and help support those who might be in abusive relationships, and we must also work to enrich our narratives and models of what healthy, loving LGBTQ relationships look like.

In memory of Devon Wade.

We know it can be hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP member. Read the full list here.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project. If you have witnessed or experienced violence, or if you want support, you can call NYC AVP’s hotline anytime, at 212 714 1141 or use the online reporting form.

NCAVP mourns the homicide of Brooklyn BreYanna Stevenson in Oklahoma City, OK

NCAVP mourns the death of Brooklyn BreYanna Stevenson, a Black transgender woman killed in Oklahoma City, OK, on November 27, 2017. Brooklyn BreYanna Stevenson is at least the 27th transgender and gender-nonconforming person we have lost to violence in 2017. According to media reports, Stevenson was found dead early the morning of the 27th and police are investigating her death as a homicide, though the investigation is still in its early stages.

We mourn the loss of Brooklyn BreYanna Stevenson, and send love and care to her friends and loved ones. “We are heartbroken,” said Brooklyn’s family in a statement earlier this week. “Brooklyn BreYanna was an amazing daughter, sister and friend with a giving and loving heart. We pray that those who committed this heinous crime will be identified and Brooklyn will receive justice.”

In memory of Brooklyn BreYanna Stevenson.

 

To contribute to Brooklyn’s family’s funeral expenses, donate here.

We know it can be hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP member. Read the full list here. You can also call NYC AVP’s hotline at any time for support: 212 714 1141.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the homicide of Giovanni Melton in Henderson, NV

NCAVP mourns the death of Giovanni Melton, a 14-year-old gay Black teenager who was killed on October 2nd, 2017. According to media reports, Giovanni was fatally shot by his father, Wendell Melton, over Giovanni’s sexuality and the fact that Giovanni had a boyfriend. His former foster mother, Sonja Jones, said: “Giovanni was abused physically and mentally and spiritually for many, many years.”

We mourn the loss of Giovanni Melton, who at 14, is the youngest LGBTQ person we have lost to hate violence and domestic violence this year, and send love and care to his friends and loved ones. Giovanni was remembered as a selfless friend who brought joy to everyone he met, and we are saddened that such a young light has been lost.

We must work to create and protect safe, supportive, and affirming environments for LGBTQ youth at all points in their lives. And we must do the difficult work of reaching out to the people we know and love in order to address the homophobia, transphobia, and biphobia that persists in our communities of color and other marginalized identities.

In memory of Giovanni Melton.

We know it can be hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP member. Read the full list here.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the homicide of Candace Towns in Macon, GA

NCAVP mourns the death of Candace Towns, a Black transgender woman killed in Macon, GA, on October 31, 2017. Candace Towns is at least the 26th transgender and gender-nonconforming person killed in 2017. According to media reports, Towns was found fatally shot after being reported missing earlier that weekend. Police are investigating her death as a homicide, though the investigation is still in its early stages. Media reports initially misgendered and dead-named Towns.

We mourn the loss of Candace Towns, and send love and care to her friends and loved ones. “If I needed anything she would give it to me. She would give me the clothes off her back,” said Malaysa Monroe, remembering Candace’s kindness and generosity.

In memory of Candace Towns.

We know it can be hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP member. Read the full list here.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the homicide of Elizabeth Stephanie Montez in Corpus Christi, TX

NCAVP mourns the death of Elizabeth Stephanie Montez, a transgender Latinx woman, killed in Corpus Christi, Texas, on October 21, 2017. According to media reports, 47-year-old Montez, who is at least the 25th transgender and gender-nonconforming person killed in 2017, had been fatally shot multiple times, and police are investigating her death as a homicide, though the investigation is still in its early stages. Media reports initially misgendered and dead-named Montez.

We mourn the loss of Elizabeth Stephanie Montez, who was a beloved performer, dancer, and friend. She is remembered in a loving obituary as “One of the most beautiful, kind, gentle, and loving human beings we have ever known. She was never afraid or ashamed to be true to herself or anyone else. She was the sweetest most kind, most courageous, most selfless person that would give the shirt off her back to anyone in need and most often did.” We must work to ensure that our LGBT elders, especially transgender and gender non-conforming elders, are uplifted and supported at all points in their lives.

Local organization, PFLAG Corpus Christi, is organizing a transgender rights rally on Saturday, November 4. Said PFLAG Corpus Christi President Kathy Huff: “We are calling for not only an end to the violence against trans women, but also for gender identity to be added to the hate crime laws in Texas, as well as within anti-discrimination laws along with sexual orientation.” The rally calls for justice for the transgender community, for action on a local level, and for equality.

In memory of Elizabeth Stephanie Montez.

For more information about the upcoming rally and PFLAG Corpus Christi, visit https://www.facebook.com/pflagcct.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the intimate partner violence homicide of Ariel Gonzalez in Broward County, FL

NCAVP mourns the death of Ariel Gonzalez, who was found dead in his apartment on September 13, 2017, following Hurricane Irma. According to media reports, 50-year-old Gonzalez was brutally murdered on September 10th, by Travis Watson and Jacob Mitchell, after Gonzalez had invited the couple into his home to hook up. Though little is known about the motive of the killing, robbery and jealousy were two factors, according to media reports. Watson is currently in custody, and police are searching for Mitchell.

We mourn the loss of Ariel Gonzalez, and send love and care to his friends and loved ones. Though not often discussed, gay and bisexual men experience intimate partner violence at similar if not higher rates as men who identify as heterosexual. As a community, and as a society, we must talk about LGBTQ IPV before it escalates, and raise up the experiences of queer, gay, bisexual and transgender men who are often left out of the conversations about this violence. We must also talk about hook-up violence, a form of violence that we need to address in our LGBTQ communities. So far in 2017 we have seen an increase in pick-up homicides, and we need awareness raising about this form of violence, affirming messages around sex, sexuality and safety, and safe spaces for our communities to meet and hook up.

In memory of Ariel Gonzalez.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the homicide of Jaylow Mcglory in Alexandria, LA

NCAVP mourns the death of Jaylow Mcglory, a Black transgender woman, who was killed on August 4, 2017. According to media reports, 29-year-old Jaylow had been fatally shot multiple times, and police are investigating her death as a homicide. A suspect, 20-year-old Desmond Harris, has been charged with second-degree murder. Early media reports initially misgendered Jaylow, and little information is available about the circumstances of her death.

We mourn the loss of Jaylow Mcglory, and send love and care to her friends and loved ones. “All of us need to be working to keep transgender people safe in our communities, and to support our trans friends and family members as they grieve and heal,” said LaLa Zannell, Lead Organizer at the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

In memory of Jaylow Mcglory.

If you are in the Louisiana area, NCAVP member organization BreakOUT! is available as a resource to you. Call (504) 522-5435 or visit www.youthbreakout.org for more information.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the death of Ally Lee Steinfeld, in Texas County, MO

NCAVP mourns the death of Ally Lee Steinfeld, a transgender teenage girl killed in Texas County, Missouri, on September 5 2017. According to media reports, Ally, who was 17 years old, was brutally assaulted and killed by four suspects, aged 18, 18, 24, and 25, who are all now in custody. Though details of the incident are still emerging, reports indicate that Ally had been in a relationship with one of the suspects, 24-year-old Briana Calderas.

We mourn the loss of Ally Lee Steinfeld, who had just come out as transgender earlier this year and was beginning to live her truth and fully express herself. That she died in such a brutal way is utterly tragic. We must work to create and protect safe, supportive, and affirming environments for transgender and gender non-conforming youth at all points in their lives and gender expression, and through mentorship and leadership, offer trans youth the support and love they need to live their truths. At the same time, we must also remember to support the cis partners of TGNC folks and work to prevent this kind of dating violence, especially among youth. Loving someone shouldn’t ever be stigmatized. We all deserve and are capable of healthy, supportive relationships, no matter who we are.

“We are here to support Ally’s family and will continue to lift Ally’s name in love and light,” said Melissa Brown, of the Kansas City Anti-Violence Project.

In memory of Ally Lee Steinfeld.

 

If you are in the Missouri area, NCAVP member organization the Kansas City Anti-Violence Project is available as a resource to you. Call (816) 561-0550 or visit kcavp.org for more information.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the possible hate violence homicide of Derricka Banner in Charlotte, NC

NCAVP mourns the death of Derricka Banner, a Black transgender woman who was shot and killed in a vehicle early Tuesday morning, September 12th, 2017 in Charlotte, North Carolina.  According to a statement by Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police, Montavious Sanchez Berry, age 18, has been arrested and charged with murder, armed robbery and shooting into an occupied vehicle. So far in 2017, we have lost 21 transgender and gender non-conforming people to homicide, and of that number, 18 have been transgender women of color.

We mourn the loss of Derricka Banner, and send love and care to her friends and loved ones. “All of us need to be working to keep transgender people safe in our communities, and to support our trans friends and family members as they grieve and heal,” said LaLa Zannell, Lead Organizer at the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

Though we ask our allies and community members to pledge #IWillNotStandBy when witnessing violence on public transportation or on the street, we also know that it can be very dangerous to intervene, and that every incident of violence is different. Learn how to intervene safely, and be sure to assess the situation before intervening. Visit #IWillNotStandBy to learn tips on bystander intervention.

In memory of Derricka Banner.

 

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the possible hate violence homicide of Bubbles (Anthony Torres) in San Francisco, CA

NCAVP mourns the death of Anthony Torres, also known as Bubbles, who was fatally shot on the sidewalk in the Tenderloin neighborhood of San Francisco on September 10, 2017. According to media reports, little is known about the motive of the shooting, and police are not currently investigating it as a hate crime.

We mourn the loss of Anthony Torres, and send love and care to Bubbles’s friends and loved ones. Many have remembered Bubbles fondly as an activist, artist, performer, and a vibrant member of a diverse and passionate music community. “We know from patterns of violence against femme/female-presenting people, especially those queering up gender, that they are a target, as transgender women face violence at excruciatingly high rates,” said Pablo Espinoza-Schaudel, of NCAVP local member organization Community United Against Violence (CUAV).

“We want to reiterate to people that safety buddies are always a good idea, especially out on the streets and at parties,” said Espinoza-Schaudel. “Even when you are the entertainer/performer/DJ. Checking in with friends, asking for help getting home or company so you are not alone on the street. Having a fully-charged cell phone, letting friends or a roommate know when you are coming home.”

Though we ask our allies and community members to pledge #IWillNotStandBy when witnessing violence on public transportation or on the street, we also know that it can be very dangerous to intervene, and that every incident of violence is different. Never put your own safety at risk, and be sure to assess the situation before intervening. Visit #IWillNotStandBy to learn tips on bystander intervention.

In memory of Bubbles, also known as Anthony Torres.

 

If you are in the San Francisco area, CUAV is available as a resource to support you. Call (415) 333-HELP or visit www.cuav.org for more information.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.