NCAVP mourns the death of Kee Sam, a 24-year-old Black transgender woman in Lafayette, LA

NACP mourns the death of Kee Sam, a 24-year-old Black transgender woman who passed in Lafeyette, Louisiana. Kee was the victim of a fatal shooting at a hotel on August 12 – she passed from injuries received in the shooting the following day. Police currently have a suspect in custody for the shooting.

Loved ones are mourning Kee’s death on her personal Instagram page, writing comments such as “this can’t be true” and “you[‘re] in my heart forever.” One person shared the hashtag #LongLiveKeeSam.

**Please note that the article referencing Kee’s death deadnames her. AVP prioritizes outlets that accurately represent the names and pronouns of transgender people, but there were unfortunately a limited number of reports surrounding Kee. AVP believes it is best practice for all journalists to correctly identify trans murder victims.**

NCAVP stands in solidarity with Black trans women, and we know that it is always hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. We know this can be even more painful when there continues to be an unchecked epidemic of homicides of Black trans women, as police violence is escalating against Black and brown people, and our nation continues to be grappling with the COVID-19 pandemic that highlights long standing healthcare disparities for Black and brown communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP member. If you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilingual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the death of Ashley Moore, a 26-year-old Black transgender woman in Newark, NJ

NCAVP mourns the death of Ashley Moore, a 26-year-old Black trans woman found dead outside the YMCA in Newark, NJ on April 1. The Newark Police Department did not make any attempt to contact her family, and ruled the death a suicide, claiming Ashley either jumped from the roof or was hit by a car, despite strangulation marks on her neck. A witness reported seeing Ashley run out of her room and downstairs that night at 3:47 am, ruling out the former, and camera footage confirmed there were no vehicles nearby at the time of her death that could have struck her. Moore was cremated before an autopsy was conducted, and a death certificate has not been issued, even 4 months after her passing. Both the police report and obituary misgendered and deadnamed Ashley. Due to pushback by Ashley’s mother Starlet Carbin and advocates, an investigation has finally been opened by the police department in connection with the county’s Homicide Task Force.

“Ashley loved people” said her mother in a phone call with NJ Advanced Media. She had a passion for writing, an enthusiasm that was sparked after she read Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone as a child, she also worked as chef at One World Trade Center. She had a younger brother, Elijah, and “always led with connection.”

Sadly, negative response from law enforcement is not exclusive to Ashley’s death – in 2018 a video she posted on Instagram chronicled an experience she had with the Newark Police Department in which they refused to file a police report after she was mugged, instead calling her a homophobic slur upon discovering she was a trans woman.

The demand for justice for Ashley is due largely in part to efforts by the Newark LGBT Community Center, and its founder Beatrice Simpkins. The org has arranged a website where supporters can learn more about the case and contribute to the fund set up to create a legal retainer, hire a lawyer, and push for an investigation.

NCAVP stands in solidarity with Black trans women, and we know that it is always hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. We know this can be even more painful when there continues to be an unchecked epidemic of homicides of Black trans women, as police violence is escalating against Black and brown people, and our nation continues to be grappling with the COVID-19 pandemic that highlights long standing healthcare disparities for Black and brown communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP member. If you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilingual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the death of Tatiana Hall, a 22-year-old Black transgender woman in Philadelphia, PA

NCAVP mourns the death of Tatiana Hall, a 22-year-old Black transgender woman who passed in Philadelphia, PA sometime around June 29th, which is when her body was discovered. Details remain unclear around Tatiana’s death, which, according to a coroner’s report provided to the press, was due to drug use and “accidental.”

Several of Tatiana’s friends and family claim that drugs were very much not a part of Tatiana’s world, and suspect foul play, perhaps even murder. “She wouldn’t take something that could harm her … This is a whole ‘nother realm, and it wasn’t her realm. This isn’t her,” said one friend. A vigil was recently held in Tatiana’s honor in New Jersey this past July, where there was music and a balloon release alongside the Passaic river.

A close relative of Tatiana, Mariah Hope, affectionately recalls her as a “diva,” who had “the prettiest smile” and “just liked to have fun.” Another loved one, Katrina Parker, who referred to Tatiana as her daughter demands justice – “We need to get justice,”.. “The person who [murdered her] needs to be in jail so she can be happy and have peace. I want her to feel like her family did what was needed for her, that we didn’t just let it be another unknown mystery.”

NCAVP stands in solidarity with Black trans women, and we know that it is always hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. We know this can be even more painful when there continues to be an unchecked epidemic of homicides of Black trans women, as police violence is escalating against Black and brown people, and our nation continues to be grappling with the COVID-19 pandemic that highlights long standing healthcare disparities for Black and brown communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP member. If you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilingual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the death of Queasha D Hardy, a 23-year-old Black transgender woman in Baton Rouge, LA

NCAVP mourns the death of Quesha D. Hardy, a 22-year-old black transgender woman who was fatally shot on July 27th in Baton Rouge, LA. Quesha is the at least 25th violent death of a trans or gender non-conforming person in 2020, and her murder was within 48 hours of Tiffany Harris.

Friends and family members have been mourning Queasha’s death on social media. Queasha was a hairstylist, and her Instagram feed showcases her work – her business operated under the name “So Federal Styles.” On Facebook, a video of Quesha dancing with friends has been shared, while others describe her as loyal, “always smiling,” and “one of a kind.” A GoFundMe has been arranged for a homegoing for Queasha, where people who knew Queasha write that she was someone who “loved to have fun,” and will be “truly missed.”

There is an ongoing investigation, and anyone with information about what happened is asked to call BRPD’s Violent Crimes Unit at 225-389-4869 or Crime Stoppers at 225-344-7867.

NCAVP stands in solidarity with Black trans women, and we know that it is always hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. We know this can be even more painful when there continues to be an unchecked epidemic of homicides of Black trans women, as police violence is escalating against Black and brown people, and our nation continues to be grappling with the COVID-19 pandemic that highlights long standing healthcare disparities for Black and brown communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP member. If you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilingual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the death of Summer Taylor, a 24-year-old white non-binary person in Seattle

NCAVP mourns the death of Summer Taylor, a 24-year-old white non-binary person killed during a Black Lives Matter protest in Seattle. Summer was struck by a car that sped down a barricaded freeway where organizers were marching – the driver has since been arrested and is being charged for the assault.

Summer worked full-time at an animal clinic in Seattle, and used they/them pronouns. Family, friends, and coworkers of Summer remember them fondly for their love of animals, activism and spirit. “They were always the first one to call people out for being sexist, racist — standing up for queer and trans people, basically anyone who needed to be stood up for,” recalls one colleague. “Anyone that works for Urban Animal will tell you that Summer Taylor’s laugh makes any bad day better,” says another.

A GoFundMe, originally set up to cover medical costs for Summer before she passed, has raised over $80,000 for her family – organizers are determining how to allocate the funds. There they wrote “Summer is an incredibly strong and independent spirit. They are a bright and caring person whose presence elicits joy and laughter in others.”

We know it can be hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP member. If you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilngual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the death of Shaki Peters, a 32-year-old Black transgender woman in Louisiana

NCAVP mourns the death of Shaki Peters, a 32-year-old Black transgender woman found dead in Amite City, Louisiana on July 1st. Police have ruled her death a homicide, and have determined a person of interest for her murder.

Shaki’s death falls in a 9-day window of a particularly deadly period for Black transgender women, in which 5 other Black trans women were found dead between June 25th and July 3rd – 4 of the losses were also due to violence. Their names were Brayla Stone, Merci Mack, Tatiana Hall, Draya McCarty, and Bree Black. It remains unconfirmed whether Draya’s death was due to a homicide, but she was also found dead in the Baton Rouge area.

On Shaki’s murder, community group Louisiana Trans Advocates stated: “Amite and Louisiana leaders must speak out against these killings, against the ongoing, systemic devaluation of trans people that pervades our media and politics, and against the institutional racism that places almost all of this burden on trans women of color. … As we mourn the loss of Shaki and Draya we must double down our efforts to ensure that all trans people across the state have access to safety.”

NCAVP stands in solidarity with Black trans women, and we know that it is always hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. We know this can be even more painful when there continues to be an unchecked epidemic of homicides of Black trans women, as police violence is escalating against Black and brown people, and our nation continues to be grappling with the COVID-19 pandemic that highlights long standing healthcare disparities for Black and brown communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP member. If you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilingual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the death of Marilyn “Monroe” Cazares, a 24-year-old Latinx transgender woman in Brawley, CA

NCAVP mourns the death of Marilyn “Monroe” Cazares, a 22-year-old Latinx transgender woman whose body was found brutally murdered in an abandoned building in Brawley, CA on July 13th. Marilyn was discovered by local law enforcement when they were called to put out a nearby couch fire at 8:30 am. The Brawley Police are currently investigating the murder, and Cazares’ family members believe it to be hate violence. “[She] was stabbed and [she] was burned, and, you know, that’s so hateful to do to somebody,” says the victim’s sister Aubrey Cazares.

Marily “Monroe” Cazares was well known by the homeless community in Brawley, including Mary Ann Isaac, manager of the organization Brawley Feed the Need. She “didn’t deserve this… not at all,” says Isaac, remembering her as “the life of the party.” Marilyn loved Marilyn Monroe, Cardi B, and Nicki Minaj, and her aunt Sonia Castenada says she “was just fabulous; always rocking crazy outfits, crazy wigs.”

Her sister has arranged a GoFundMe to cover funeral costs, and her family arranged a march from the scene of the crime to the Brawley Police Department to honor and demand #JusticeForMarilyn, and to “protest transphobia.” The Brawley police ask that anyone with information contact Det. Sgt. Jesse Rotner at (760) 351-7777.

NCAVP stands in solidarity with all trans women of color, and we know that it is always hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. We know this can be even more painful when there continues to be an unchecked epidemic of homicides of Black and brown trans women, as police violence is escalating against Black and brown people, and our nation continues to be grappling with the COVID-19 pandemic that highlights long-standing healthcare disparities for Black and brown communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP member. If you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilingual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the death of Bree Black, a 27-year-old Black transgender woman in Pompano Beach, FL

NCAVP mourns the death of Bree Black, a 27-year-old Black transgender woman shot to death in Pompano Beach, Florida on July 3rd. Bree was pronounced dead shortly after cops arrived at the scene of the shooting that night.

Since her murder, activists and protesters set up a vigil to honor Bree, and demand justice for her death, while bringing attention to police violence that enables intercommunity violence. An organizer from Black Lives Matter Alliance Broward was quoted at the event saying “We want some immediate answers to what’s going on and we want this investigation to be done with full integrity.” The reward for information regarding Bree’s murder has since been increased to $8,000 by Broward Sheriff’s Office – anyone with information is asked to contact Det. Louis Bonhomme at (954) 321-4377. Those who wish to remain anonymous may contact Broward Crime Stoppers at (954) 493-TIPS (8477) or online at BrowardCrimeStoppers.org.

Trans led organization TransInclusive Group have set a memorial fund for Bree via GoFundMe – the money will be transferred to Bree’s family.

NCAVP stands in solidarity with Black trans women, and we know that it is always hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. We know this can be even more painful when there continues to be an unchecked epidemic of homicides of Black trans women, as police violence is escalating against Black and brown people, and our nation continues to be grappling with the COVID-19 pandemic that highlights long standing healthcare disparities for Black and brown communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP member. If you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilingual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the death of Tiffany Harris/Dior H Ova, a Black transgender woman

NCAVP mourns the death of Dior H Ova, a Black transgender woman who was stabbed to death in the Bronx on July 26th. Some reports also refer to Dior as Tiffany Harris, though it remains unclear which best reflects her identity – a trans advocate and organizer of homeless youth programs who knew Dior confirmed her identity as Tiffany, but social media accounts of the victim list her name as Dior. Friends have confirmed that Tiffany identifies as a trans woman, but not which name is most accurate.

A friend remembers Dior as a shopaholic who was obsessed with Louis Vuitton. “Everyone loves her … She is one of a kind,” recalls another. According to her Facebook, Dior worked as a personal shopper, and enjoyed “Desperate Housewives,” “Nip/Tuck,” and other TV dramas. She would also post photos of various luxury brands she loved.

Police are still searching for the suspect involved in the murder. Anyone with information about the assailant’s identity is encouraged to call Crimestoppers at 1-(800) 577-TIPS,

NCAVP stands in solidarity with Black trans women, and we know that it is always hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. We know this can be even more painful when there continues to be an unchecked epidemic of homicides of Black trans women, as police violence is escalating against Black and brown people, and our nation continues to be grappling with the COVID-19 pandemic that highlights long standing healthcare disparities for Black and brown communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP member. If you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilingual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the death of Aja Raquell Rhone-Spears, a 32-year-old Black transgender woman in Portland, OR

NCAVP mourns the death of Aja Raquell Rhone-Spears, aka Rocky Rhones, a 32-year-old Black transgender woman who was killed in Portland on July 28th. Aja was attending a vigil for another homicide victim, Tyrell Penney, a Black man who was fatally shot earlier in the week, also in Portland.

In a GoFundMe set up for Aja, the family writes that they are “devastated,” and on Facebook a friend calls her death a “great loss.” Despite multiple witnesses, police say they do not have any leads, claiming that vigil attendees were “hostile” and “uncooperative.”

Anyone with information regarding Aja’s murder is encouraged to contact Detective Brad Clifton at 503.823.0696, Brad.Clifton@portlandoregon.gov, or Detective Mike Greenlee at 503.823.0871, Michael.Greenlee@portlandoregon.gov.

NCAVP stands in solidarity with Black trans women, and we know that it is always hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. We know this can be even more painful when there continues to be an unchecked epidemic of homicides of Black trans women, as police violence is escalating against Black and brown people, and our nation continues to be grappling with the COVID-19 pandemic that highlights long standing healthcare disparities for Black and brown communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP member. If you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilingual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.