NCAVP mourns the death of Brayla Stone, a 17-year-old Black transgender woman in Arizona

NCAVP mourns the death of Brayla Stone, a 17-year-old Black transgender woman, whose death is being investigated as a homicide by local police in Arkansas.  Brayla’s body was found in a car near a walking path in the Little Rock suburb of Sherwood on June 25th.  Media reports that a person on social media later claimed he was paid five thousand dollars to kill her, but the posts have since been taken down.  Local groups held a candle-light vigil for Brayla, at Boyle Park in Little Rock, to celebrate her life and call for attention to her death, and a Change.org petition already has over 200,000 signatures.  As too often happens, Brayla was misgendered and deadnamed in the media, and so news of her death was not given due attention.  

David Johns, Executive Director of the National Black Justice Coalition, said in a statement. “Brayla Stone was seventeen years young when someone murdered her because we live in a society where it is not yet explicit that when we say BlackLivesMatter we mean all Black lives, which includes Black trans women and girls.”

NCAVP stands in solidarity with Black trans women, and we know that it is always hard to read these reports of violence against our communities.  We know this can be even more painful when there continues to be an unchecked epidemic of homicides of Black trans women, as police violence is escalating against Black and brown people, and our nation continues to be grappling with the COVID-19 pandemic that highlights long standing healthcare disparities for Black and brown communities.  If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP member. If you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilingual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the death of Merci Mack, a 22-year-old Black transgender woman in Dallas, TX

NCAVP mourns the death of Merci Mack, a 22-year-old Black transgender woman, was fatally shot in Dallas, TX, on Tuesday, June 30th, just days after the death of Brayla Stone, 17, in Arkansas on June 25th, and within a month of two Black trans women, Rem’mie Fells (27) and Riah Milton (25), who died in a 24-hour period over June 8th and 9th.  As too often happens, Merci was dead-named in police statement, even though she was identified as a transgender woman.  

Merci’s body was found unconscious in a parking lot of the Rosemont Apartments by a passerby, and she was pronounced dead at the scene. Local residents said they heard gunshots around 5 a.m. the same morning, but police haven’t identified any suspects or a motive yet. 

The Dallas Morning News points out that Texas currently leads the nation in murders of transgender people. The state has had 15 anti-trans murders in the last five years and nearly half of them have happened in Dallas. The actual number could be even higher due to underreporting and misgendering of victims.  

NCAVP stands in solidarity with Black trans women, and we know that it is always hard to read these reports of violence against our communities.  We know this can be even more painful when there continues to be an unchecked epidemic of homicides of Black trans women, as police violence is escalating against Black and brown people, and our nation continues to be grappling with the COVID-19 pandemic that highlights long standing healthcare disparities for Black and brown communities.  If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP member. If you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilingual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the death of Jayne Thompson, a 33-year-old white transgender woman in Aurora, CO

NCAVP mourns the death of Jayne Thompson, a 33-year-old white transgender woman, who was shot and killed by a police officer on May 11, 2020. Her death was not initially recognized as another loss of a trans woman, due to misgendering and deadnaming in the media and by police. While Jayne was killed in Colorado, she lived in Arizona.  

The news of Jayne’s death came to light as yet another trans woman, Selena Reyes Hernandez’ death was revealed, similarly delayed due to deadnaming and misgendering by police, medical examiner, and media.  News of Jayne’s loss also comes on the heels of the violent deaths of two Black trans women last week, Rem’mie Fells and Riah Milton, who died in a 24-hour period.  

NCAVP stands in solidarity with all trans women, and we know that it is always hard to read these reports of violence against our communities.  We know this can be even more painful when there continues to be an unchecked epidemic of homicides of Black trans women, as police violence is escalating against Black and brown people, and our nation continues to be grappling with the COVID-19 pandemic that highlights long standing healthcare disparities for Black and brown communities.  If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP member. If you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilingual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the death of Selena Reyes Hernandez, a 37-year-old Latinx transgender woman in Chicago, IL

NCAVP mourns the death of Selena Reyes Hernandez, a 37-year-old Latinx transgender woman, was shot and killed in her home in the Southside of Chicago, by an 18 year old high school student on May 31, 2020.  Her killer told police that he killed Selena because he learned she was trans. Selena’s death did not immediately come to light in queer media, due to misgendering and deadnaming in the media, by the medical examiner, and by police, similar to what occurred around the death of Jayne Thompson in Colorado.  News of Selena’s loss also comes on the heels of the violent deaths of two Black trans women last week, Rem’mie Fells and Riah Milton, who died in a 24-hour period.  

NCAVP stands in solidarity with all trans women of color, and we know that it is always hard to read these reports of violence against our communities.  We know this can be even more painful when there continues to be an unchecked epidemic of homicides of Black and brown trans women, as police violence is escalating against Black and brown people, and our nation continues to be grappling with the COVID-19 pandemic that highlights long standing healthcare disparities for Black and brown communities.  If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP member. If you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilingual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

 

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the death of Dominique “Rem’mie” Fells, a 27-year-old Black transgender woman in Philadelphia, PA

NCAVP mourns the death of Dominique “Rem’mie” Fells, a 27-year-old Black transgender woman, whose June 8, 2020 death was ruled a homicide, according to the Philadelphia Police, speaking to media sources.  Rem’mie’s death onJune 8th was just one day before Riah Milton, another Black trans woman, was shot and killed during a robbery in Liberty Township, Ohio. 

Kendall Stephens, a friend of Rem’mie’s, shares: “We’re devastated.  We live with a constant fear of being assaulted and being murdered before our time. It seems to be a person of trans experience of color, that’s like a death sentence.”  Kendall also shared that Rem’mie was a social butterfly who was very close to her mother, and was making plans to go back to school with dreams of being a fashion designer.  Kendall shares that Rem’mie was also a dancer and artist, a vibrant person, who “ lived her truth so loud that you could hear her a mile away.”  

Rem’mie’s family and friends have set up a GoFundMe page to help pay for funeral expenses. 

NCAVP stands in solidarity with Black trans women, and we know that it is always hard to read these reports of violence against our communities.  We know this can be even more painful when there continues to be an unchecked epidemic of homicides of Black trans women, as police violence is escalating against Black and brown people, and our nation continues to be grappling with the COVID-19 pandemic that highlights long standing healthcare disparities for Black and brown communities.  If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP member. If you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilingual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

Safety Planning for Protests

A safety plan is a way to think through what you need to keep yourself and others safe, connect with people and resources to keep yourself and others safe, and it helps to prepare you for action if confronted with violence or attempted acts of violence. In the context of protests, safety planning is about thinking through potential risks, making a communication plan, and connecting with peers. While a safety plan cannot prevent all acts of violence and it is never your fault if someone chooses to cause harm, creating a plan ahead of time and thinking about ways to protect yourself is one way to stay safe. 

Before attending a protest, it is important to think through a safety plan and assess your personal risk. Creating a safety plan is simply a way to increase safety for yourself and others when entering into a situation where harm is possible, and to prepare for various potential scenarios.  No plan is perfect, and if you experience violence, including by police, it is not your fault. 

For AVP staff: If you’re planning on going to a protest, connect with anyone in COPA to get support.

More resources:
Protest Safety Zine
Coronavirus Risk Reduction During Protests

Current Situation 

The situation as of early June 2020 is highly volatile, with law enforcement and other agents of the state using tactics that escalate violence against community members. Even peaceful protests have been met by state violence in recent days, often without warning, so we want everyone to consider their options and their safety planning carefully in this moment. 

Evaluating Risk 

Before you commit to attending a protest or action, do an honest assessment of your personal risk. You can think about the following questions: 

  • How might my perceived race, gender, sexuality and other identity factors impact the ways that police and community members interact with me or target me?
  • Are there factors that increase risks to my safety if I am arrested, surveilled by police or documented by media or fellow protestors, including around immigration, outstanding warrants, mental or physical health needs, or other risks? 
  • How well have I slept and how is my mental health today? Will either of these factors negatively impact my ability to make clear, fast decisions in a scary moment?
  • How is my body feeling today? Am I able to get away quickly if a situation escalates?
  • Do I need glasses or contacts? If my glasses break or I get tear gassed and need to remove my contacts, will I be able to navigate? 
  • Do I have friends or organizing colleagues I can attend the protest with and create a buddy system with?
  • Do I have a safety contact who is not going who I can check in with and can support my plan in what to do if I am missing after the protest?
  • Could I get home or to a safe place if I lost my phone and/or wallet?
  • Can I walk or move for long periods of time, potentially without rest? If not, is there a way for me to plan for rest and/or map out how long before I should head home if possible?

What to Bring and Wear

  • Wear nondescript clothing – plain colors, especially black, can help reduce the likelihood of being surveilled and identified by law enforcement
  • If possible, cover your hair and identifying marks like scars and tattoos
  • Wear a mask or other face covering to help keep you safe from the spread of COVID-19, chemical agents, and to conceal your identity
  • Wear clothing and footwear you can move quickly in 
  • Bring water and snacks (protein bars are a good option for quick energy and don’t melt like candy bars)
  • Bring medication that has been prescribed for you that maintains your health. If you can, bring a one or two day supply of medication (in case you are detained) in the original prescription bottle to help prevent it being flagged as a controlled substance.
  • Avoid bringing or wearing bulky backpacks or tote bags, and don’t bring any prohibited substances, in case of arrest
  • Bring a portable phone charger if you have one, as well as cables.

Digital Safety Protocol

  • One way to stay safe and in touch with your people is to share your location data using your phone’s capability to do this. That way your designated contacts can view your location without having to text and ask where you are.
  • Conversely, having data shared can make you very traceable by law enforcement, and you might instead consider turning your phone off, putting it on airplane mode, or leaving it at home.
  • Use an emergency location sharing app like Circle of 6 – which was created as a sexual violence support and prevention tool. You can enter the contact information for up to six people who will be alerted with your location and other information you choose to share if you press one simple button in the app during a moment of crisis. Let your contact people know beforehand what you want them to do in case of arrest, detainment, or injury.
  • Documenting police violence can be helpful, but instead of posting it immediately try, if possible, to check in with the community members in the video. Ideally, you should share the video or photos with the people you filmed and let them decide what to do with the video. Some people will choose to share videos of police violence on social media immediately without the consent of impacted people – think ahead of time about the potential harms and benefits of doing so.
  • If you use your phone to take pictures, make an effort to ask for consent of the people you are photographing. If this is not possible in a fast moving moment, use a face blurring app to conceal individual identities. There are many available face blurring apps – search, download, and practice with them ahead of time.
  • Disable face-recognition sign-in to unlock a smart phone and also disable thumb-print sign-in. In the situation someone is detained, it makes it harder for police to unlock your phone if we are not consenting. As an alternative, set up a 6 digit code to unlock the phone.

Planning for Arrest

  • Write the phone number for the National Lawyers’ Guild on your body in sharpie: (212) 679-6018. You may also add other phone numbers to your body of your personal contacts. You might not be able to access your phone or it might run out of battery. Keep in mind that NLG can reach out to your emergency contacts and can support you in ensuring your rights are protected. people should also share their A-number (alien-number for immigrants/non green-card holders) with their emergency contact, whether buddy in protest or remote support person
  • If you are an immigrant or non-green card holder, you should share your A-number with your emergency contact, whether that person is a buddy in the protest or remote support person.
  • Carry at least four quarters – jails still have pay phones and calls are not free.
  • If you get arrested, you can yell your name and birthdate to witnesses either during arrest or once you are at the jail and being transferred inside – this can help your people to find you in the system faster. Keep in mind that you will get booked under the name on your ID, and for TGNC people yelling this name to strangers may not feel ok and that may be a reason not to do this.
  • If you use social media, plan with your contacts in advance about whether or not you want people to tag you on social media with references to your arrest.

General info on arrests:

  • In general folks are being released after a few hours, given desk tickets, no bail set. Not being charged or arraigned. But now with curfew, things might change.
  • If you get arraigned (and not dismissed with desk ticket), you have to call the National Lawyers Guild (when allotted your one phone call). They will connect you to Neighborhood Defender Services or Legal Aid. You will get assigned a lawyer. The lawyers are connected to the bail fund. 

***Most important thing is having an NLG number on your body because they will take your phone. (Make sure ink dries so it is not smudged.) Another resource: 1‑833‑3‑GOODCALL, https://goodcall.nyc/.

Communication Safety Planning

  • Use an encrypted texting app like Signal to communicate with fellow organizers when you are planning for an action and communicating during the protest. You can create a group on Signal so that multiple people can be in the loop. Signal can also be used to make encrypted phone calls.
  • Talk to someone who will not be at a protest about what your plan for the event is. Establish a check in time by which you expect to be heading home and let your check in person know when you’re leaving the protest and when you are home. 
  • Communicate with your check in person about what you want them to do if they have not heard from you by the time you agreed on. Do you want them to try to establish if you’ve been arrested and booked (booking could take place much later)? Do you want them to try and find out if you’re injured or at a hospital? Do you want them to amplify the fact that you are missing on social media?
  • Make a plan for a meet up spot with people you are attending the protest with, in case you get separated or you are unable to use your phone to connect. For a march, you might select several different locations along the route. You might also select a spot that is further away from the site of the action to put a buffer between yourselves and the action.

Aftercare

  • Even without arrest or violence, protests and actions can mean wear and tear on your body and your spirit–make sure you have adequate time and a safe space to rest, eat, and recharge afterwards, if possible. Drink lots of water.
  • Be mindful of what you’ll need to meet your responsibilities in the hours and days after an action, including getting to work, engaging with family, etc.
  • Caring for yourself and your community will look different for everyone, but plan to check in with your people in the days after an action, for mutual support.

Other Ways to Support Actions

These tips focus on ways to increase safety while physically attending protests and actions, but there are many folks for whom it may not be physically or emotionally safe to do so, for many reasons. Here is a list of ways to support actions and protests, beyond attending:

  • Be a check in person for someone who is going to protests. Help them talk through a safety plan.
  • Offer safe space for bathroom and safety breaks, or food and water to folks who are participating, particularly if you live near the route and can offer these things. Evaluate your risk with respect to your health if you are sick with COVID-19 or immunocompromised.  Consider having food delivered if someone is supporting protests from home. 
  • Cover someone’s shift at work or watch their kids, if that is something you can and want to do. 
  • Contribute financially to resources supporting protests and the fight for equity
  • Spread the word on social media and to your networks, being careful not to reveal protesters’ identity or locations that could be tracked by police; 
  • Support efforts to defund the police and invest in social services. In New York, follow the Communities United for Police Reform #NYCBudgetJustice campaign

IMPORTANT NUMBERS & RESOURCES

  • New York City Anti-Violence Project (24 hour Hotline in English/Spanish): 212-714-1141
  • National Lawyers Guild hotline for arrest support 212-679-6018

Tips for When Staying Home Isn’t The Safest Plan

While being at home is best practice to avoid the spread of this virus, for some it may carry other risks. Many survivors are navigating a difficult reality: staying home to keep themselves and their community safe may keep them isolated with the person(s) causing them harm. This could be a partner, a roommate, or a family member.

If you’re unsafe, try to consider what your options are and remember AVP is here to help with navigating available resources. 

Call AVP’s 24/7 hotline 212-714-1141, other hotlines, or contact service providers from a separate room.

  • Going to the bathroom can provide an added layer of privacy.

  • If you are on the phone and unattended, you can run the shower or faucet to make some noise during the call if you need to and feel comfortable doing so.

  • If you have private access to the internet, you can submit an online report form to us and someone will reach back out to you via email within the first 24-48 hours.

If going outside is accessible, social distancing still permits walks, while maintaining a physical distance of 6 feet from other people.

  • Going outside can give you a break from a tense situation,

  • It can also remove you from and/or deescalate an unsafe situation or interaction.

  • Take this time to ground yourself, call a social support, reach out to a hotline, or have a counseling session.

  • You can also use this time to use safety apps such such as Circle of 6 and/or grounding apps such as Calm.

Identify your Pod, your network of people in your building or digital community, for continued support.

  • Create a code word/sentence with people in your support network to indicate that you need an immediate interruption or immediate help.

  • Discuss with your support network what you would like that help to look like if you use the code word/sentence (i.e. deescalation, calling a specific individual, calling 911 etc.)

  • Create scheduled check-ins with people in your support network.

Hide some of your resources in safe places & create a plan:

  • Stash a portion of your medication, money, drugs, or food that you can take with you if you leave, or can access on your own time.

  • Keep your ID on you as much as possible.

  • Create a go-bag of essentials including your medication, money, phone charger, food, drugs, and IDs.

  • Think about the easiest and safest routes for you to get out of your home quickly.

Learn more about safer drug use and harm reduction here.

We understand not all of these tips will work for, or apply to, everyone. Ultimately, AVP believes survivors know what they need, and we trust you to use the strategies and tools that work best for you. Please remember that you don’t have to go it alone, and we are here for you, to listen, to create a personalized safety plan, or for other support at 212-714-1141.

#QueerSVAM: What is Sexual Violence?

April is Sexual Violence Awareness Month, a time to honor the experiences of sexual violence survivors, and to find ways that we can all engage in destigmatizing and preventing sexual violence. At AVP, we use the term Sexual Violence Awareness Month, instead of the more traditionally recognized Sexual Assault Awareness Month, because we understand sexual violence occurs on a spectrum of behaviors, including harassment, exploitation, and murder. We affirm all of the ways our communities define their experiences of sexual violence, whether or not it meets the criminal legal definition of sexual assault.

Sexual violence is any completed or attempted act, comment, or advance by anyone in any setting to which an individual has not given your explicit consent. It can be part of, and also can be distinct from, the cycle of power and control central to  intimate partner violence. Sexual violence can also be perpetrated by current and former partners, coworkers, classmates, friends, acquaintances, and strangers. Although the majority of sexual violence is committed by cisgender men, people of all genders can experience and perpetrate sexual violence. In LGBTQ community, we face  even higher rates of sexual violence than our non-LGBTQ counterparts.

The mainstream definition of sexual violence typically offers a limited understanding of who can experience and perpetrate sexual violence. This leaves LGBTQ survivors further marginalized and without proper resources or tools for navigating and recovering from harm. LGBTQ people who are sex workers, currently or formerly incarcerated, Black or Brown, low income, disabled, transgender, or undocumented may have a harder time accessing supportive services after violence due to racial, economic, and gendered systems of oppression.

No matter a person’s identity, sexual violence is never the survivor’s fault. If you or someone you know is a survivor, reach out to your local anti-violence project or to AVP’s 24/7, bilingual hotline at (212) 714- 1141.

NCAVP Urges Support for the Equality Act

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP), a coalition of 50 LGBTQ anti-violence organizations across the country, supports the Equality Act and urges Congress to pass H.R. 5. The Equality Act is a crucial step toward LGBTQ liberation, introduced by Representatives David Cicilline (D-RI) and Brian Fitzpatrick (R-PA), Senator Jeff Merkley (D-OR), Senator Tammy Baldwin (D-WI), and Senator Cory Booker (D-NJ).

The Equality Act of 2019 amends the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to include sex, sexual orientation, and gender identity, in addition to race, color, religion, or national origin, as protected identity factors. The bill forbids discrimination based on sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, and sex stereotypes for all public services and accommodations.

While other proposed anti-discrimination legislation address single topics such as housing, education, public accommodations, and juror protection separately, The Equality Act takes a more comprehensive approach in protecting against discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity. In addition, the Equality Act would protect against discrimination from retail stores, transportation, pharmacies, legal services, banks, and emergency shelters.

Despite some progress in the movement for LGBTQ equality, people who identify as LGBTQ still face interpersonal and institutional oppression that limits their socioeconomic mobility and ability to access various public services. Discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity is prevalent for LGBTQ people in all aspects of public life—from housing and healthcare to employment and education—and limits the success, empowerment and overall health of the LGBTQ community.

Here are a few examples of the type of discrimination that restricts the social mobility and general wellbeing of LGBTQ people, making it more challenging to pursue safe and fulfilling lives:

  • Nearly 1 in 3 transgender Americans reported being denied equal treatment in a retail store, while 1 in 5 reported unequal treatment at a restaurant or a hotel.
  • One survey found that more than half of LGBT middle and high school students do not feel safe at school due to their sexual orientation, and over one-third feel unsafe in relation to their gender expression.
  • 23% of respondents experienced some form of housing discrimination in the past year, such as being evicted from their home or denied a home or apartment because of being transgender.
  • In 2015, 39% of non-binary people and 34% of transgender men and women reported receiving negative treatment on public transportation.
  • 30% of respondents who had a job in the past year reported being fired, denied a promotion, or experiencing some other form of mistreatment in the workplace related to their gender identity or expression, such as being harassed or attacked.

There is an indivisible connection between discrimination and harassment of LGBTQ people in the public sphere and more severe acts of violence against and within the community. Hate violence and discrimination often serve as risk factors for interpersonal violence in LGBTQ relationships. Research shows that prolonged discrimination and prejudice against historically marginalized communities causes chronic stress, and can exacerbate situations of intimate partner violence. Further, preventing discrimination in housing, employment, banks, and elsewhere enables to survivors to more safely access supportive survivors after experiencing violence.

Jaime M. Grant, Lisa A. Mottet, and Justin Tanis, “Injustice at Every Turn: A Report of the National Transgender Discrimination Survey” (Washington: National Center for Transgender Equality and the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force, 2011), available at http://www.thetaskforce.org/ downloads/reports/reports/ntds_full.pdf.

Joseph G. Kosciw. “The 2013 National School Climate Survey” (Washington: GLSEN, 2014), available at http://glsen.org/nscs

James, S. E., Herman, J. L., Rankin, S., Keisling, M., Mottet, L., & Anafi, M. (2016). The Report of the 2015 U.S. Transgender Survey. Washington, DC: National Center for Transgender Equality.

See above.

See above.

Barrett, B. (March 2015). “Domestic Violence in the LGBT Community.” Encyclopedia of Social Work.

NCAVP mourns the death of Vongell Lugo, a 36 year-old gay man in Washington, D.C.

NCAVP mourns the death of Vongell Lugo, a 36 year-old gay man who is the first reported LGBTQ homicide linked to intimate partner violence in 2019.  According to media reports, Vongell was stabbed to death in his home by his partner, U.S. Navy Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Collin J. Potter, 26, who was arrested and has been charged by the U.S. Attorney with second degree murder.

Vongell was a successful retail executive, who is described as “a kind soul, the center of the party, and a beacon of light that made an impact on everyone he came into contact with,” on Caring Bridge, which also has information on events to commemorate Vongell’s life, mourn his passing, and contribute to expenses.  Events included a candlelight vigil on Friday, January 11th, a viewing on Sunday, January 13th, and funeral services Monday, January 14th.

NCAVP’s latest report, issued earlier this week, Hate Violence and Intimate Partner Violence in LGBTQ and HIV-affected Communities in 2017 highlights the LGBTQ people’s risk for severe and fatal intimate partner violence, as well as hate violence.

We know it can be hard to read these reports of violence against and within our communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP member. If you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilingual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.