NCAVP mourns the hate violence homicide of Gwynevere River Song in Waxahachie TX

NCAVP mourns the death of Gwynevere River Song, a transfeminine person who identified as femandrogyne and who used “they” pronouns, who was fatally shot in her home on August 12th. Little is known about the motive or perpetrator of their homicide at this time, though police have a suspect in custody.

We mourn the loss of Gwynevere River Song, who is the 17th transgender person we have lost to fatal violence this year. Gwynevere was remembered by many on an online tribute page, where friends from all over wrote of her kindness, creativity, and advocacy. “Your smile could light up a room and will forever be etched in my memory,” wrote one friend. Another friend wrote, “Gwyn was fiercely intelligent without ever being condescending, passionate and compassionate, and had a wicked sense of humor. Sending love to everyone who knew her well. I hope you can find comfort in how much she meant to so many people.” Gwynevere was remembered in a loving memorial, coordinated by Trans Pride Initiative and Gwyn’s mother.

We see again and again that transgender people, especially transfeminine folks, are disproportionately and overwhelmingly affected by hate violence, and that this violence is all too often fatal. This cannot go on. We call upon our communities of many identities to embrace our transgender members and support each other through economic empowerment and narratives of strength and love. We must work to provide empowering and affirming spaces for transgender and gender-nonconforming people, both in public spaces and in our workplaces, schools, and homes.

We send love and care to the friends and loved ones of Gwynevere River Song. Friends have suggested donations to Trans Lifeline in her memory.

In memory of Gwynevere River Song.

If you are in the Dallas, TX area, NCAVP member organization Trans Pride Initiative is available to support you. Get in touch at (214) 449-1439 or find out more at tpride.org.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the hate violence homicide of John Jolly in New York City, NY

NCAVP mourns the death of John Jolly, who was stabbed to death on the corner of 44th Street and Third Avenue in Manhattan on Wednesday, August 2nd, 2017.  According to media reports, Nathaniel Glover, also known as Kidd Creole, allegedly killed Jolly because he believed that Jolly was hitting on him. Glover has been arrested and charged in connection with his death.

We mourn the loss of John Jolly, who was killed because he was perceived to be gay, or perceived to be making unwanted sexual advances toward someone he didn’t know.

Though we ask our allies and community members to pledge #IWillNotStandBy when witnessing violence on public transportation or on the street, we also know that it can be very dangerous to intervene, and that every incident of violence is different. Never put your own safety at risk, and be sure to assess the situation before intervening. Visit #IWillNotStandBy to learn tips on bystander intervention.

In memory of John Jolly.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the possible hook-up and hate violence homicides of Glenser Soliman and An Vinh Nguyen near Houston, Texas

NCAVP mourns the deaths of Glenser Soliman and An Vinh Nguyen, who were both killed earlier this year in the Houston, Texas area, however we are just now learning about their homicides. According to media reports, Glenser Soliman was found dead on February 25th, 2017 and An Vinh Nguyen was last seen on March 31st, 2017 and is presumed dead. Both are believed to have been lured to their deaths via dating or hook up apps by two cousins Brandon Alexander Lyons and Jerrett Jamal Allen.

We mourn the loss of Glenser Soliman and An Vinh Nguyen, who likely lost their lives to hook-up violence, a form of violence that we need to talk about more and address in our LGBTQ communities. Homophobia is a key factor the targeting of gay men for robbery and violence, and so far in 2017 we have seen an increase in pick-up homicides. As our communities move online we need awareness raising about this form of violence, affirming messages around sex, sexuality and safety, and safe spaces for our communities to meet and hook up.

We ask that people read and share AVP’s Online Dating and Hook-Up Safety Tips. And we ask that all LGBTQ people and allies work toward creating a culture where hooking up is destigmatized and we can support one another in safety planning and on the occasions where violence happens.

In memory of Glenser Soliman and An Vinh Nguyen.

NCAVP mourns the hate violence homicide of Juan Javier Cruz in Lake Worth, FL

NCAVP mourns the death of Juan Javier Cruz, who was fatally shot after defending his group of friends against homophobic slurs on August 6. According to media reports, Cruz, who was 22 years old, and a group of friends were leaving a restaurant and were followed by 48-year-old Nelson Hernandez Mena, who called out the group homophobic slurs and threatened them with physical violence before shooting Cruz, who had defended his friends. Mena has been charged with Cruz’s murder.

We mourn the loss of Juan Javier Cruz, who in defending the lived experiences of himself and his friends lost his own life to fatal violence. Toxic masculinity and patriarchy affects LGBTQ immigrants and communities of color in multiple, intersecting ways, and it is only by addressing these systems of oppression that we can work to end hate violence in our communities. We send love and care to those friends of Juan’s whom he defended, and to his friends and loved ones.

Though we ask our allies and community members to pledge #IWillNotStandBy when witnessing violence on public transportation or on the street, we also know that it can be very dangerous to intervene, and that every incident of violence is different. Never put your own safety at risk, and be sure to assess the situation before intervening. Visit #IWillNotStandBy to learn tips on bystander intervention.

In memory of Juan Javier Cruz.

NCAVP mourns the intimate partner violence homicide of Felicia Dormans in Mount Holly, NJ.

NCAVP mourns the death of Felicia Dormans, who was fatally shot by her wife, Laura Bluestein, on August 6, according to media reports. As of now, little is known about the motive of the shooting. Bluestein has been charged with Felicia’s murder and was taken into custody.

We mourn the loss of Felicia Dormans, who is the 9th LGTBQ victim of fatal intimate partner violence NCAVP has counted this year, and send love and care to her friends and loved ones. Though not often talked about, intimate partner violence (IPV) affects lesbian, bisexual, and gay people at the same or higher rates than non-LGB people. And yet, LGBTQ people continue to experience discrimination and violence when accessing care and support around relationship violence.

Working together to support each other as a community, and helping support those who might be in abusive relationships, is crucial to helping prevent intimate partner violence before it escalates. And in doing so, we must also work to enrich our narratives and models of what healthy, loving LGBTQ relationships look like, and support each other in understanding and learning that we are all deserving of love, as a community and as individuals.

In memory of Felicia Dormans.

NCAVP mourns the hate violence homicide of TeeTee Dangerfield in College Park, GA

NCAVP mourns the death of TeeTee Dangerfield, a Black transgender woman, who was fatally shot while parked in her vehicle on the morning of July 31, according to media reports. No suspect and no motive have been reported in her homicide, though College Park police are pursuing leads.

We mourn the loss of TeeTee Dangerfield, who was described by her cousin as “just an all-around beautiful person” and “an amazing soul,” and who is the 16th transgender woman of color and the 13th Black transgender woman we have lost to fatal violence this year. We see again and again that black transgender women are disproportionately and overwhelmingly affected by hate violence, and that this violence is all too often fatal. This cannot go on. We call upon our communities of many identities- LGBTQ, Black, of color- to embrace our transgender sisters and support each other through economic empowerment and narratives of strength and love.

We send love and care to the friends and loved ones of TeeTee Dangerfield. To support TeeTee’s family with burial and funeral costs, please visit their fundraiser here.

In memory of TeeTee Dangerfield.

NCAVP mourns the hate violence homicide of Rodriguez Montez Burks, in Munising, MI

NCAVP mourns the death of Rodriguez Montez Burks, a Black gay man who was killed by a fellow inmate in his cell at the Alger County Correctional Facility on July 20. According to media reports, prior to his death, prison staff ignored both Burks’s and his cellmate’s requests to be separated, the issue being Burks’s sexual identity.

We mourn the death of Rodriguez Montez Burks, and send love and care to his friends and loved ones. Furthermore, we condemn the systemic violence that led up to his death from fatal, homophobic hate violence, which was only exacerbated by the way the prison system treats LGBTQ inmates. LGBTQ prisoners are more likely to experience mistreatment, harsh punishment, and sexual victimization while incarcerated, and Burks’s death came as a direct consequence of prison staff’s refusal to protect him.

LGBTQ organizations across the country, such as NCAVP member program Trans Pride Initiative in Dallas, Texas and Black and Pink, are working to end violence in the prison system. Learn more and get involved and ensure that all LGBTQ people can live free from violence.

In memory of Rodriguez Montez Burks.