NCAVP Mourns The Death of Keanna Mattel, a 35 year-old Black Trans woman in Detroit, MI

NCAVP mourns the death of Keanna Mattel, a 35 year-old Black trans woman in Detroit, MI. Keanna was a vibrant member of Detroit’s ballroom scene. She had also spoken in media about hate violence against trans women in Detroit in 2015. On the morning of December 7, Keanna was found dead by apparent homicide. According to media reports, Detroit police have arrested an unnamed 46-year-old male in connection with the shooting. Keanna’s loved ones took to social media to mourn her passing.

We know it can be hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP member. If you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilingual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

The New York City Anti-Violence Project Mourns Lives Lost At Pittsburgh Shooting

In response to the Pittsburgh Mass Shooting, the New York City Anti-Violence Project’s Executive Director, Beverly Tillery, released the following statement:  

“We mourn the 11 lives lost in the shooting in Pittsburgh’s Tree of Life Synagogue during the Sabbath. The Anti-Violence Project unequivocally condemns this anti-Semitic attack and stands in solidarity with the Jewish community during this time of mourning. As an organization dedicated to ending violence against LGBTQ and HIV-affected communities, we understand the importance of taking a stand against white supremacy. This attack on Jewish communities is an attack on all of us. We must stand together, building community and supporting one another, during this time.”

The Anti-Violence Project honors the 11 lives lost to hate violence:

  • Joyce Fienburg, 75, of Oakland
  • Richard Gottfried, 65, of Ross Township
  • Rose Mallinger, 97, of Squirrel Hill
  • Jerry Rabinowitz, 66, of Edgewood
  • Cecil Rosenthal, 59, of Squirrel Hill
  • David Rosenthal, 54, of Squirrel Hill
  • Bernice Simon, 84, of Wilkinsburg
  • Sylvan Simon, 86, of Wilkinsburg
  • Daniel Stein, 71, of Squirrel Hill
  • Melvin Wax, 88, of Squirrel Hill
  • Irving Younger, 69, of Mt. Washington

Click here to learn more about the lives of those lost. 

NCAVP Mourns The Death Of Traylon Brown, a 29-Year-Old Black Gay Man, In Dallas, TX

NCAVP mourns the death of Traylon Brown, a 29-year-old gay black man from Dallas, TX. According to local news reports, Brown was found dead inside of his vehicle in the afternoon of Sunday, October 21st. Brown’s death is being investigated as a homicide.

Dallas police says Brown  was also referred to, and identified as, “Brittany White.”According to the Dallas Voice, a friend of Brown, Rocky Collins, says that Brown didn’t identify as transgender but often dressed up in wigs and women’s clothing to meet men online.

Police are requesting anyone with information contact Detective Jacob White at 214-671-3690 or jacob.white@dallascityhall.com and reference case No. 231046-2018. For those who wish to remain anonymous, they can contact Crime Stoppers at 214-373-8477 who is offering a reward of up to $5,000 for information that leads to an arrest and indictment in Brown’s case.

A gofundme has been set up by Brown’s family to help cover funeral expenses.

We know it can be hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP member. If you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilingual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

While the Trump Administration Turns Their Backs, AVP Supports All Survivors

Beverly Tillery, Executive Director of the New York City Anti-Violence Project, the nation’s largest LGBTQ specific anti-violence organization, issued the following statement on the Kavanaugh hearings and VAWA re authorization:

The treatment of Dr. Christine Blasey Ford was just one more demonstration of this Administration’s disrespect and lack of concern for survivors of sexual violence. I watched the hearings with a knot in my stomach, not only because Dr. Blasey Ford was questioned and challenged as if she was on trial, and many senators and the President showed a complete lack of concern that a Supreme Court Justice nominee has been accused of sexual violence by multiple women. But I watched knowing the many steps this Administration has taken, and continues to take, to cut direct services and roll back protections for survivors of violence.

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, one in three women and more than one in four men in the U.S. experience rape, physical violence, or stalking from an intimate partner in their lifetime. Still, the President and his administration have been systematically eroding federal support for survivors of sexual violence which has been particularly harmful towards LGBTQ people and other marginalized communities. This Administration has cut funding for programs that directly serve survivors, proposed deep cuts to public benefit programs that help survivors escape violence situations and remain independent, and is attempting to prohibit domestic violence survivors from seeking asylum. AVP has already lost critical federal funding that helps keep our services available and free to LGBTQ survivors.

Congress has the opportunity to take a positive step for survivors by reauthorizing the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), but they are dragging their feet. Since its introduction in 1994, VAWA has provided almost half a billion dollars in funding to nonprofits and community organizations that support survivors of violence. In 2013, AVP and the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP), which we coordinate, worked tirelessly to ensure that the LGBTQ community was explicitly included in VAWA, and as a result, VAWA became the first, and so far the only, piece of legislation passed by Congress that explicitly prohibits discrimination on the basis of gender identity and sexual orientation. Because of these protections in VAWA, LGBTQ survivors of domestic and intimate partner violence have greater access to services. But if conservative law makers have their way, the protections for LGBTQ survivors under VAWA could be severely stripped.

As we saw yesterday, and we’ve seen over and over, Congress and this Administration aren’t capable in supporting survivors of sexual violence. At a time in this country when more survivors are bravely speaking up, and many of us y are calling for accountability and access to services, the least Congress can do is to ensure that those of us who know how to support survivors have the resources to do so.

Every day, AVP staff provide a lifeline of support and advocacy to LGBTQ survivors of sexual violence who are disbelieved, discredited, retraumatized, and revictimized by those who are supposed to help them.

Today, you can help make sure AVP can keep providing free and affirming services for LGBTQ survivors of all forms of violence.

Contact Congress and ask them to:

  • Call for a full investigation into the accusations against Kavanaugh
  • Reauthorize VAWA with full inclusion of LGBTQ survivors

And support AVP today.

AVP learns of hate violence incident in Williamsburg

AVP has learned of an anti-gay hate violence incident in Brooklyn, NY. According to media reports, two gay men, 29 and 34, were attacked and beaten unconscious in Williamsburg around 1:00 am on Sunday, September 23. The suspect made anti-gay statements before assaulting the men who had left a popular Williamsburg gay bar, according to police. Local authorities are still searching for the suspect whose picture was captured as he fled the scene.

We have reached out to NYPD about the incident. If you have been impacted by the incident and would like to report or to seek support, reach out to AVP by calling our free and confidential 24/7 bilingual (English/Spanish) hotline at 212-714-1141 or our online reporting form.

AVP will join the New York City’s Commission on Human Rights for a Day of Visibility on Friday, September 28, morning (8:00-9:30 am) in response to this hate violence. The Commission on Human Rights will be passing out Know Your Rights information and AVP will be sharing resources on our services for survivors.

If you know any information, please report to NYPD’s Crime Stoppers Hotline at 1-800-577-TIPS (8477) or for Spanish, 1-888-57-PISTA (74782). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime Stoppers website at WWW.NYPDCRIMESTOPPERS.COM or by texting their tips to 274637 (CRIMES) then enter TIP577. All calls are strictly confidential.

Update: Brandon McNamara, 25, has been arrested and facing multiple charges for the incident. According to local news reports, “McNamara is charged with two counts each of second-degree assault as a hate crime, second-degree assault, second-degree aggravated harassment as a hate crime, first-degree harassment and second-degree harassment.”

Anti-Violence Project Client Gia Has Been Granted Asylum

New York City Anti-Violence Project’s client, Gia, has been granted asylum on the basis of the harm suffered due to her transgender identity.

Content note: portions of the following story might be triggering.

Gia has always known she was transgender. She was born in Mexico, a country with one of the highest rates of violence against transgender women in the world. A few years after she came out, Gia experienced severe violence by classmates and community members. The continued threats caused Gia to relocate to three different parts of Mexico in search for safety. After her transgender friend, Karina, was beaten to death in front of her by a mob, Gia went into hiding before fleeing to the United States.

Gia came to the U.S. over 15 years ago by crossing the U.S. — Mexico border. She did not immediately apply for asylum because she was too traumatized by the violence she experienced to tell her story. After receiving counseling at Community Healthcare Network, Gia was referred to AVP by a community liaison, Lorena Borjas. It was there that she met AVP’s Board of Immigration Appeals Accredited Representative, Christina Rosalin Peña, and became a client in AVP’s legal department.

During the interview with the asylum officer, Gia needed a Spanish to English translator. Kiara Montero-Reyes, a Clinician in AVP’s Client Services department, assisted in the translation during the interview process. After the application and the interview, Gia was granted asylum on September 10, 2018.

Gia is an avid transgender rights activist and has lobbied in Albany and Washington, D.C. for the rights of undocumented transgender women. She hopes to continue with her activism and help other transgender women like herself.

Support AVP’s legal work today

If you are in need of legal services, call our 24 hour hotline at 212-714-1184. During business hours, you will speak directly with a Counselor/Advocate who will conduct a brief intake and forward your information and legal concerns to the Legal Services Department who will then schedule an in-person comprehensive legal intake. Legal appointments are usually made within one week, and faster in emergency cases.

 

 

 

NCAVP Mourns the Death of Nikki Janelle Enriquez, A 28-Year-Old Latinx Trans Woman, in Laredo, TX

NCAVP mourns the death of Nikki Janelle Enriquez, a 28-Year-Old latinx trans woman, in Laredo, TX. U.S. Border Patrol intel supervisor, Juan David Ortiz, has been charged with the murders of Nikki Janelle Enriquez and three other women—Melissa Ramirez, 29, Claudine Ann Luera, 42, and a woman who has not yet been publicly identified. All of the women involved were sex workers. According to recent reports, Enriquez was found and killed Saturday, September 15.

In initial reports, law officials deadnamed and misgendered Enriquez. After this information was released, Webb County-Zapata County District Attorney, Isidro Alaniz, correctly identified Enriquez as a transgender woman. The practice of deadnaming and misgendering trans, gender non-confirming and non-binary people is oppressive and contributes to the physical and fatal violence waged against the TGNC community.

In remembering Nikki Janelle Enriquez, NCAVP grieves and stand in solidarity with all sex workers and the TGNC community.

We know it can be hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP member. If you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilingual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP Mourns The Death of Shantee Tucker, A 30-Year-Old Black Trans Woman, In Philadelphia, PA

NCAVP mourns the death of Shantee Tucker, A 30-Year-Old Black trans woman from Philadelphia, PA. According the media reports, Tucker died due to gunshot wounds sustained in the early morning of Wednesday, September 5. Police are asking anyone with information to contact the homicide unit at 215-686-3334.

Friends on social media poured out their love and condolences. Many also noted that Tucker had just celebrated a birthday earlier in the week.

The Philly Trans March, scheduled to take place on October 6 pm, is an event that will commemorate the life of Tucker and other trans lives lost this year.

We know it can be hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP member. If you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilingual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

 

NCAVP Mourns The Death Of Vontashia Bell, An 18 Year-Old Black Transgender Woman, In Shreveport, LA

NCAVP Mourns the death of Vontashia Bell, an 18 year-old black transgender woman, in Shreveport, LA. Bell was found August 30th with a gunshot wound to the chest. She died due to her injuries after being rushed to the hospital. Police are asking anyone with information to contact them at 318-673-6955. To give information anonymously, you can call 318-673-7373. They’re offering a $1,000.00 reward for information that would lead to an arrest.

Local news and police have misgendered and deadnamed Vontashia, an act that contributes to the violence perpetuated against trans women.

The organization Louisiana Trans Advocates released the following statement:

“Vontashia Bell must not die in vain.  Her murder is a reminder of the current climate and national discourse on trans issues. Dehumanizing language and actions lower the barriers to this kind of senseless violence.  Shreveport and Louisiana leaders must speak out against these killings, against the ongoing, systemic devaluation of trans people that pervades our media and politics, and against the institutional racism that places almost all of this burden on trans women of color.”

Rest in power Vontashia Bell.

We know it can be hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP member. If you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilingual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP mourns the death of Dejanay Stanton, a 24 year-old black transgender woman, in Chicago, IL. 

NCAVP mourns the death of Dejanay Stanton, a 24 year-old black transgender woman, in Chicago, IL. As reported by Windy City Times, Stanton was found dead on August 30th due to a gunshot wound to the head. She was pronounced dead upon arriving to the hospital. Police are currently investigating Stanton’s death.

Activist LaSaia Wade, executive director of Brave Space Alliance, described Stanton to Windy City Times as “sweet.”

“Every time you saw her she had a smile on her face,” Wade said. “She was just trying to live her best life as a young girl.”

Friends are planning on releasing balloons August 31, at 7:30 pm, near the site of her murder (King Drive and 40th st.) We send our love and thoughts to Stanton’s family and friends.

We know it can be hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP member. If you or someone you know is experiencing violence, you can reach our free bilingual national hotline at 212-714-1141 or report online for support.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.