NCAVP mourns the death of Viccky Gutierrez in Los Angeles, CA

NCAVP mourns the death of Viccky Gutierrez, who was killed in a fire police are describing as “suspicious” in Los Angeles on January 10, 2018. The Los Angeles Police Department announced on Friday, January 12 that they currently have a suspect in custody in relation to the fire. Bamby Salcedo, President of TransLatin@ Coalition, announced Viccky’s death in a Facebook post, writing: “It is with deep sadness, rage and pain that I have to share with all of you that one of our sisters was brutally murdered in #southlosangeles last night.” As the LAPD continues to investigate the fire, local activists including Salcedo as well as Mariana Marroquin at the Los Angeles LGBT Center’s Anti-Violence Project are working to ensure justice for Viccky.

 “It is a sad day for the transgender community after the death of Vicky Gutierrez, a young immigrant transgender woman from Honduras. Vicky was an active member and a leader in Los Angeles, where she found love and support away from her country and family,” said Mariana Marroquin, program manager of the Los Angeles LGBT Center’s Anti-Violence Project. “As one of the nation’s largest providers of services to empower and enhance the lives of transgender people, the Center along with other organization is working closely with Los Angeles Police Department to leave no stone unturned during the investigation of Vicky’s death. She deserves justice—and nothing less.”

We mourn the loss of Viccky Gutierrez, a Latina trans woman from Honduras who was remembered by friends as “the nicest girl in the world,” whose “smile would give anyone comfort,” and “an inspiration for many of us.” A vigil for Vicky has been scheduled for the evening of Friday, January 12, 2018.

In memory of Viccky Gutierrez.

A fund has been set up to send Viccky Gutierrez’s remains back to her family and provide for a funeral service. Donate to the fund here.

We know it can be hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP member. Read the full list here.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP Mourns the Homicide of Kaladaa Crowell and Kyra Inglett in West Palm Beach, Florida

NCAVP mourns the deaths of Kaladaa Crowell and her daughter, Kyra Inglett, who were fatally shot in West Palm Beach, FL, on December 28, 2017. According to media reports, Kaladaa Crowell, 36, and her 11-year-old daughter Kyra were shot by 26-year-old Marlin Joseph, the son of Crowell’s girlfriend, following an argument in their home. Joseph has been arrested and charged with the murders of Crowell and Inglett.

We mourn the loss of Kaladaa Crowell and her daughter, Kyra Inglett, and we send love and care to their family and loved ones. Kaladaa’s girlfriend, Robin Denson, described her as “the sweetest person” who would “give the shirt off her back to help anybody.” At a vigil, a friend remembered Kaladaa as “a hard-working young lady who had a beautiful daughter.” Kyra was remembered for her artistic talent and her spunky personality.

In the last week of December, four Black lesbian women—Shanta Myers, Brandi Mells, Kerrice Lewis, and Kaladaa Crowell—were killed. In the case of the Myers-Mells family and Crowell’s family, their children were also victims of this deadly violence. All too often, the identities and stories of lesbian women, especially Black lesbian women, are erased after their deaths. In drawing attention to these tragic deaths, we hope to not only bring awareness of the anti-LGBTQ violence taking place but also uplift the lives and identities of these members of our community. We take this as a call to be compassionate and respectful in honoring the identities of our community members in death- but to just as importantly support our friends and neighbors while they’re still with us.

In memory of Kaladaa Crowell and Kyra Inglett.

We know it can be hard to read these reports of violence against our communities. If you need support in these difficult times, you can always reach out to your local NCAVP member. Read the full list here.

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

AVP learns of an anti-LGBTQ incident on the subway in Brooklyn

AVP has learned of an anti-LGBTQ incident which occurred on a 5 train in Brooklyn on August 15th at about 6:30pm. According to media reports, a man with “Boston” tattooed along his right forearm pulled a knife on a man who was travelling with his partner as the train traveled toward the Beverly Road station in East Flatbush. The individual who pulled the knife fled the scene and has not been apprehended. While no bias motive has been reported in the media, the survivor, who wishes to remain anonymous, reached out to AVP to report that bias was a factor in this incident.

AVP has reached out to the office of City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito, the office of New York City Councilmember Jumaane Williams, the office of Public Advocate Letitia James, the New York City Commission on Human Rights, and the Mayor’s Community Affairs Unit.

TAKE ACTION WITH AVP

We all have a role in ending violence. One way to take action right now is to take our Bystander Intervention Pledge, #IWillNotStandBy, to commit to look out for one another, to report anti-LGBTQ violence and discrimination where we witness it, and to intervene in ways that are safe for ourselves and those around us.

If you witness hate violence you can:

  • Assess the situation to see how you can best take action. Only proceed if it is safe to do so in all of these instances.
  • Make your presence known by asking questions and talking to both the victim and the perpetrator.
  • Speak up, be LOUD, and call out what’s happening: identifying violence by name can help deter it.
  • Distract and divert the attacker’s attention by making a scene, and being noisy to draw the attention of others.
  • Record what’s happening by taking video on your phone.
  • Ask what support the survivor needs and provide it if you can.
  • Report the incident to AVP on our 24/7 hotline at 212-714-1141 or our Online Reporting Form. The hotline can also be a resource for the survivor if they so choose.

 

AVP will be doing outreach in Brooklyn in the weeks ahead to hand out safety information and resources.  Additionally, to work on issues of violence in an ongoing way, join AVP’s Hate Violence Community Action Committee, a community and survivor-led working group that addresses hate violence, police violence, hook-up violence, and discrimination against LGBTQ and HIV-affected communities, which meets monthly at AVP. To join us for outreach or to get involved with our Hate Violence Community Action Committee contact LaLa Zannell at lzannell@avp.org.

REPORTING VIOLENCE HELPS END VIOLENCE

AVP encourages you to report violence you experience or witness to our free and confidential 24-hour bilingual (English/Spanish) hotline at 212-714-1141 where you can speak with a trained counselor and seek support, or you can report violence anonymously online, or to ask for a counselor to reach out to you.

We can #LiveWithoutFear. You can help.

Here’s what’s happening: a 45% increase in hotline calls. A 46% spike in reports of hate violence. A 67% increase in new clients seeking counseling.

At AVP, we’re here for you whenever, wherever. Counselors are ready to talk one-on-one. Lawyers are ready to advocate for you in court. We organize LGBTQ and HIV-affected communities to create a culture of respect and safety throughout NYC.

We’re asking you to join us as a fundraiser to make sure AVP remains a lifeline for survivors of violence. Welcome to Day 1 of our #LiveWithoutFear campaign.

From now until May 15th, we’ll be working to raise $25,000. Join us as a fundraiser to make a difference in the lives of LGBTQ and HIV-affected survivors of violence across New York City.

It’s easy to get started, and we are here to support you every step of the way. Here’s what to do:

  1. Set up your own fundraising page. On it, tell the story of what AVP means to you.
  2. Share your page with friends and family, and ask them to give a gift to sustain our crucial work.
  3. Check out our detailed fundraising guide, which will walk you through every step of the process.

 

Together, we can build a world in which all LGBTQ and HIV-affected people are safe, respected, and #livewithoutfear. Help us make it a reality.

NCAVP Mourns the Homicide of Jamie Lee Wounded Arrow, a Two-Spirit Transgender Woman Killed in Sioux Falls, South Dakota; the 2nd Reported Killing of a Transgender/ Gender Non-Conforming Person NCAVP Has Responded to in 2017

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) has learned of the homicide of Jamie Lee Wounded Arrow, a 28-year-old two-spirit transgender woman found dead in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, on January 6th, 2017. According to Mic, her death is being investigated as a homicide. Jamie identified as two-spirit, a Native American/First Nations term that has historically encompassed many mixed-gender roles; she also identified as a transgender woman. Since her death, friends and family have expressed their love for Jamie on Facebook, describing her as “originally from the Pine Ridge Indian reservation and a proud Oglala Lakota trans woman” and concluding: “our hearts are broken as we will miss her very much.”

“We are deeply saddened and send our thoughts to Jamie’s family and loved ones,” said Shelby Chestnut, Director of Community Organizing and Public Advocacy at the New York City Anti-Violence Project. “Jamie’s homicide is the second homicide of a transgender woman of color in 2017 and we are only seven days into the new year. Her homicide is especially troubling as it highlights the disproportionate impact violence has on trans people of color, especially two-spirit people who are often invisible within LGBTQ communities. Now more than ever we must defer to communities most impacted by this deadly violence and follow their leadership to find solutions to this violence.”

NCAVP’s most recent hate violence report, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and HIVAffected Hate Violence in 2015, recorded 24 reported hate violence homicides of LGBTQ people, a 20% increase from the 20 reported anti-LGBTQ homicides in 2014. Of the 24 reported homicides, 62% of the victims were people of color. Sixteen (67%) of the 24 reported homicide victims were transgender and gender non-conforming. Of the total number of homicides, thirteen (54%) of the victims were transgender women of color.

In 2016, NCAVP responded to the homicides of 23 transgender and gender nonconforming people, the highest ever recorded by the Coalition.

NCAVP is a resource for anyone who experiences violence. For more information, or to locate an antiviolence program in your area, please contact us at info@ncavp.org or visit us online. Join NCAVP in our efforts to prevent and respond to LGBTQ and HIV-affected violence. To learn more about our national advocacy and receive technical assistance or support, contact us at info@ncavp.org.

If you are a member of the media, please contact:

Sue Yacka, New York City Anti-Violence Project: syacka@avp.org or 212-714-1184

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP Mourns the Homicide of Mesha Caldwell, a Transgender Woman of Color Killed in Canton, Mississippi; the 1st Reported Killing of a Transgender/Gender Non-Conforming Person NCAVP Has Responded to in 2017

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) has learned of the homicide of Mesha Caldwell, a Black transgender woman, killed in Canton, Mississippi on January 4th , 2017. According to Mic, she was initially misgendered by local press. In the wake of her death, friends, family and loved ones flooded social media with messages of love for Mesha.

“We are deeply saddened by the death of Mesha Caldwell, and we send our thoughts and condolences to those who have been impacted by her death,” said Emily Waters, Senior Manager of National Research and Policy at the New York City Anti-Violence Project. “This is the first homicide of a transgender person that NCAVP has responded to in 2017, during a time of heightened fear and increased violence against LGBTQ communities. As we continue to hear more reports of violence, we must remind ourselves that this violence is not normal and fight harder than ever to keep transgender people safe.”

NCAVP’s most recent hate violence report, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and HIVAffected Hate Violence in 2015, recorded 24 reported hate violence homicides of LGBTQ people, a 20% increase from the 20 reported anti-LGBTQ homicides in 2014. Of the 24 reported homicides, 62% of the victims were people of color. Sixteen (67%) of the 24 reported homicide victims were transgender and gender non-conforming. Of the total number of homicides, thirteen (54%) of the victims were transgender women of color.

In 2016, NCAVP responded to the homicides of 23 transgender and gender nonconforming people, the highest ever recorded by the Coalition.

NCAVP is a resource for anyone who experiences violence. For more information, or to locate an antiviolence program in your area, please contact us at info@ncavp.org or visit us online. Join NCAVP in our efforts to prevent and respond to LGBTQ and HIV-affected violence. To learn more about our national advocacy and receive technical assistance or support, contact us at info@ncavp.org.

If you are a member of the media, please contact:

Sue Yacka, New York City Anti-Violence Project: syacka@avp.org or 212-714-1184

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

NCAVP Mourns the Intimate Partner Violence Related Homicide of India Monroe, a Transgender Woman of Color Killed in Newport News, Virginia; the 23rd Reported Killing of a Transgender/Gender Non-Conforming Person NCAVP Has Responded to in 2016

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) has learned of the intimate partner violence related homicide of India Monroe, a Black transgender woman killed in Newport News, Virginia on December 19th 2016. Original media initially misgendered Monroe, who was found dead in a home along with Mark Gray; both had died of gunshot wounds. According to a more recent article, Monroe’s death has been determined a homicide and police are investigating it as a domestic incident. On social media, India’s friends remembered her life and her sense of style, saying that she liked “looking amazing” and that she was always “so sweet and so kind and will truly be missed.”

“We’ve responded to three reports of homicides in Virginia in the past ten weeks, and two of those people have been trans women of color and all three have been women of color. We’re working hard in community to support folks while also continuing to work to prevent this violence from happening in the first place,” said Stacie Vecchietti, Director at Virginia Anti-Violence Project. “Part of that work, in a larger context, is actively working against anti-trans legislation, such as the Physical Privacy Act that was introduced yesterday in the Virginia general assembly. Legislation like this reinforces the hate and fear that breeds violence against queer and transgender people in Virginia.”

“We send our condolences to the family and friends of India Monroe, whose organizing efforts brought her story to national media attention,” said Shelby Chestnut, Director of Community Organizing and Public Advocacy at the New York City Anti-Violence Project. “As we end 2016 with the highest number of trans and gender nonconforming homicides ever recorded by NCAVP, and already having learned of one trans homicide in 2017, the LGBTQ community, allies, and media must, now more than ever, commit to reporting on and ending violence against transgender people.”

NCAVP’s most recent hate violence report, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and HIVAffected Hate Violence in 2015, recorded 24 reported hate violence homicides of LGBTQ people, a 20% increase from the 20 reported anti-LGBTQ homicides in 2014. Of the 24 reported homicides, 62% of the victims were people of color. Sixteen (67%) of the 24 reported homicide victims were transgender and gender non-conforming. Of the total number of homicides, thirteen (54%) of the victims were transgender women of color.

In 2015, NCAVP responded to the homicides of 22 transgender and gender nonconforming people in total. This is the 23rd * reported killing of a transgender or gender non-conforming person that NCAVP responded to in 2016.

Along with India Monroe we have lost Noony Norwood, a Black transgender woman (Richmond, VA), Brandi Bledsoe, a Black transgender woman (Cleveland, OH), Jazz Alford, a Black transgender woman (Birmingham, AL), Crystal Edmonds, a Black transgender women (Baltimore, MD), T.T. Saffore, a Black transgender woman (Chicago, IL), Rae’Lynn Thomas, a Black transgender woman (Columbus, OH), Erykah Tijerina, a Latinx transgender woman (El Paso, TX), Dee Whigham, a Black transgender woman (St. Martin. Mississippi), Deeniquia Dodds, a Black transgender woman (Washington, DC), Goddess Diamond, a black transgender woman (New Orleans, LA), Amos Beede, a white transgender man (Burlington, VT), Mercedes Successful, a Black transgender woman (Haines City, FLA), Reese Walker, a Black Transgender Women (Wichita, KS), Keyonna Blakeney, a Black transgender woman (Rockville, MD), Shante Thompson, a Black transgender woman (Houston, TX), Jasmine Sierra, a Latin@ transgender woman (Bakersfield, CA), Monica Loera, a Latina transgender woman (Austin, TX), Kayden Clarke, a white transgender man (Mesa, AZ), Maya Young, a Black transgender woman (Philadelphia, PA), Demarkis Stamsberry, a Black transgender man (Baton Rouge, LA), Kedarie/Kandicee Johnson, a Black, gender-fluid 16-year-old (Burlington, IA) and Quartney Davia Dawsonn-Yochum, a Black transgender woman (Los Angeles, CA).

*NCAVP is looking into the homicide of Simon/Sierra Bush, a white genderqueer individual in Boise, Idaho. NCAVP responded to the death of Skye Mockabee earlier this year, but after research, do not believe her death was a homicide. NCAVP also looked into the death of Veronica Cano, a Black transgender woman, in San Antonio Texas, and Lexxi Sironen, a white transgender woman in Waterville, Maine, and at this time do not believe that their deaths were a result of homicide. We continue to send support to the loved ones of Simon/Sierra Bush, Skye Mockabee, Lexxi Sironen and Veronica Cano.

NCAVP is a resource for anyone who experiences violence. For more information, or to locate an antiviolence program in your area, please contact us at info@ncavp.org or visit us online. Join NCAVP in our efforts to prevent and respond to LGBTQ and HIV-affected violence. To learn more about our national advocacy and receive technical assistance or support, contact us at info@ncavp.org.

If you are a member of the media, please contact:

Sue Yacka, New York City Anti-Violence Project: syacka@avp.org or 212-714-1184

NCAVP works to prevent, respond to, and end all forms of violence against and within lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and HIV-affected communities. NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs and affiliate organizations who create systemic and social change. NCAVP is a program of the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

AVP Has Learned of a Hate Violence and Intimate Partner Violence Related Double Homicide in Hamilton Heights

AVP has learned of a hate violence and intimate partner violence related double homicide that occurred in the Hamilton Heights neighborhood of Manhattan. According media reports (trigger warning for extreme violence), Felicia Barahona, age 36, and her child Miguel Barahona, age 4, were found dead in their apartment on Monday, December 26th, 2016. The child’s father, Isaac Duran Infante, age 23, has been arrested in connection with the homicide. Infante allegedly told police that part of the motivation for the killing was that Felicia dressed their son in “girl’s clothing” and referred to the child as a girl on Facebook. Felicia Barahona had been Duran’s teacher at Dewitt Clinton High School, and she had initiated their relationship when he was underage.
AVP has reached out to the office of City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito, the office of New York City Councilmember Mark Levine, the office of Public Advocate Letitia James, the New York City Commission on Human Rights, the Mayor’s Office to Combat Domestic Violence, the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office, the NYPD Hate Crimes Task Force, the NYPD Domestic Violence Unit, the LGBT Liaison to the Police Commissioner, and the NYPD Community Affairs Bureau.

TAKE ACTION WITH AVP

In response, AVP will be engaging in outreach in Hamilton Heights in the weeks ahead. We will post outreach details as soon as they have been confirmed on our Facebook page and on AVP’s events calendar. Additionally, to work on issues of violence in an ongoing way, join AVP’s Community Action Committees, community and survivor-led working groups that addresses hate violence, police violence, hook-up violence, intimate partner violence and sexual violence against and within LGBTQ and HIV-affected communities, and which meet monthly at AVP. To join us for outreach or to get involved with our Hate Violence Community Action Committee contact LaLa Zannell at lzannell@avp.org.

AVP IS HERE FOR YOU 24/7

AVP encourages you to report violence you experience or witness to our free and confidential 24-hour bilingual (English/Spanish) hotline at 212-714-1141 where you can speak with a trained counselor and seek support. You can also report violence anonymously online or ask for a counselor to reach out to you.

HELP AVP MAKE THE CITY SAFER FOR OUR COMMUNITIES

Find out more about AVP at our website, avp.org, and get regular updates on our ongoing work on Facebook.com/antiviolence or Twitter @antiviolence, to get involved and make a difference.

AVP Learns of an Attack on a Transgender Man in Harlem, Manhattan

AVP has learned of an attack on a Black transgender man which occurred on an uptown 4 train at 125th Street in Manhattan on December 24th, 2016. According to media reports, Ijan Jarrett, age 44, offered his seat to a woman on the train, who then used racial slurs and stabbed him under the eye.

AVP has reached out to the office of City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito, the office of New York City Councilmember Inez Dickens, the office of Public Advocate Letitia James, the New York City Commission on Human Rights, the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office, the NYPD Hate Crimes Task Force, the LGBT Liaison to the Police Commissioner, and the NYPD Community Affairs Bureau.

TAKE ACTION WITH AVP

We all have a role in ending violence. One way to take action right now is to take our Bystander Intervention Pledge, #IWillNotStandBy, to commit to look out for one another, to report anti-LGBTQ violence and discrimination where we witness it, and to intervene in ways that are safe for ourselves and those around us.

If you witness hate violence you can:

• Assess the situation to see how you can best take action. Only proceed if it is safe to do so in all of these instances.
• Make your presence known by asking questions and talking to both the victim and the perpetrator.
• Speak up, be LOUD, and call out what’s happening: identifying violence by name can help deter it.
• Distract and divert the attacker’s attention by making a scene, and being noisy to draw the attention of others.
• Record what’s happening by taking video on your phone.
• Ask what support the survivor needs and provide it if you can.
• Report the incident to AVP on our 24/7 hotline at 212-714-1141 or our Online Reporting Form. The hotline can also be a resource for the survivor if they so choose.

AVP will be doing outreach in Harlem in the weeks ahead to hand out safety information and resources. Additionally, to work on issues of violence in an ongoing way, join AVP’s Hate Violence Community Action Committee, a community and survivor-led working group that addresses hate violence, police violence, hook-up violence, and discrimination against LGBTQ and HIV-affected communities, which meets monthly at AVP. To join us for outreach or to get involved with our Hate Violence Community Action Committee contact LaLa Zannell atlzannell@avp.org.

REPORTING VIOLENCE HELPS END VIOLENCE

AVP encourages you to report violence you experience or witness to our free and confidential 24-hour bilingual (English/Spanish) hotline at 212-714-1141 where you can speak with a trained counselor and seek support, or you can report violence anonymously online, or to ask for a counselor to reach out to you.

SUPPORT AVP’S WORK TO MAKE THE CITY SAFER FOR LGBTQ AND HIV-AFFECTED NEW YORKERS

Find out more about AVP at our website, avp.org, and get regular updates on our ongoing work on Facebook.com/antiviolence or Twitter @antiviolence, and get involved and make a difference.

 

AVP Has Learned of an Anti-LGBTQ Hate Violence Incident in Tribeca

AVP has learned of an anti-LGBTQ hate violence incident that occurred outside the organizing space Decolonize This Place on the night of December 17th, 2016. According to media reports, a group of anti-racist activists leaving an event at the space were physically assaulted by four men, who chanted “Trump, Trump, Trump” during the attack. According to witnesses, the motive for the attacks was clearly racist, transphobic, and homophobic in nature: “People can ostensibly see that the people that were targeted were queer, black and non-cisgender,” said a witness.
AVP has reached out to the office of City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito, the office of New York City Councilmember Margaret Chin, the office of Public Advocate Letitia James, the New York City Commission on Human Rights, the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office, the NYPD Hate Crimes Task Force, the LGBT Liaison to the Police Commissioner, and the NYPD Community Affairs Bureau.

TAKE ACTION WITH AVP

We all have a role in ending violence. One way to take action right now is to take our Bystander Intervention Pledge, #IWillNotStandBy, to commit to look out for one another, to report anti-LGBTQ violence and discrimination where we witness it, and to intervene in ways that are safe for ourselves and those around us.

If you witness hate violence you can:

• Assess the situation to see how you can best take action. Only proceed if it is safe to do so in all of these instances.
• Make your presence known by asking questions and talking to both the victim and the perpetrator.
• Speak up, be LOUD, and call out what’s happening: identifying violence by name can help deter it.
• Distract and divert the attacker’s attention by making a scene, and being noisy to draw the attention of others.
• Record what’s happening by taking video on your phone.
• Ask what support the survivor needs and provide it if you can.
• Report the incident to AVP on our 24/7 hotline at 212-714-1141 or our Online Reporting Form. The hotline can also be a resource for the survivor if they so choose.

AVP will be doing outreach in Tribeca in the weeks ahead to hand out safety information and resources. Additionally, to work on issues of violence in an ongoing way, join AVP’s Hate Violence Community Action Committee, a community and survivor-led working group that addresses hate violence, police violence, hook-up violence, and discrimination against LGBTQ and HIV-affected communities, which meets monthly at AVP. To join us for outreach or to get involved with our Hate Violence Community Action Committee, contact LaLa Zannell atlzannell@avp.org.

REPORTING VIOLENCE HELPS END VIOLENCE

AVP encourages you to report violence you experience or witness to our free and confidential 24-hour bilingual (English/Spanish) hotline at 212-714-1141 where you can speak with a trained counselor and seek support, or you can report violence anonymously online, or to ask for a counselor to reach out to you.

SUPPORT AVP’S WORK TO MAKE THE CITY SAFER FOR LGBTQ AND HIV-AFFECTED NEW YORKERS

Find out more about AVP at our website, avp.org, and get regular updates on our ongoing work on Facebook.com/antiviolence or Twitter @antiviolence, and get involved and make a difference.